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Old April 12th, 2007, 12:13 AM   #161
superchan7
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Those outdoor-ish types of tiles are used extensively in Taipei MRT and Kaohsiung MRT. While I have nothing against them (they get stepped on anyway), I have heard numerous complaints about them being out of place.
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Old April 12th, 2007, 04:49 AM   #162
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Originally Posted by zergcerebrates View Post
Nice Pictures. I thought the Kaoshiung Station would look nice on the inside but not really so. The exterior surroundings like the landscaping, the exterior building and the platforms are nice but the interior main hall is kinda disappointing. They should of used marble on its floors, yes I know more expensive but it'll make the station look more modern. I am not really impressed by the tiles they've chosen to use, makes the entire station look dated and the tiles looks like those you will find at public toilets.
i TOTALLY agree about the tiles. they definitely should have used marble or some other kind of surface treatment besides tiles. i'm so sick of seeing tiles covering EVERYTHING in Taiwan - buildings, houses, sidewalks, platforms, walls, etc. etc. etc. alot of buildings even have the same exact tiles covering the sidewalks, exterior walls, interior walls and floors. i mean, how friggin lazy is that to use the same tiles to cover everything?? everything there are tiles, tiles, tiles, tiles. and cement.
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Old November 5th, 2007, 03:28 AM   #163
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Tile's less slippery for wet days? There must be some reason.
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Old November 5th, 2007, 04:26 AM   #164
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Those are impressive pictures Taipei Walker.
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Old June 20th, 2011, 02:24 PM   #165
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Wow I can't believe it's been almost 4 years since the last post here; for those reading, don't worry, Taiwan High Speed Rail still exists! Although it's future maybe be in jeopardy...

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...08a945af810.21

Quote:
Taiwan high speed rail 'sinking'

(AFP) – 6 days ago

TAIPEI — A top Taiwanese official said Tuesday the earth was sinking under the island's high-speed rail, warning it could become inoperable in 10 years's time if nothing is done.

Along a stretch of rail in central Taiwan, the soil has subsided due to excessive draining of ground waters, and the limit of what is considered safe is approaching, said Lee Hong-yuan, head of the Public Construction Commission.

"The high-speed rail will face a huge crisis if we can't solve the problems within the next 10 years," Lee told reporters.

If the subsidence continues, the train will have to decelerate along some stretches, leaving it questionable if it still qualified as "high-speed", an official with the commission told AFP.

The cabinet is planning to host a meeting later this week to try to find a solution to the safety issues, he added.

The 345-kilometre (207-mile) system using Japanese bullet-train technology is billed as one of Taiwan's largest privately funded transport projects with an estimated cost of $15 billion.

However, the high-speed rail company had incurred about $2 billion in losses, or roughly two thirds of its capitalisation, three years after the system went into operation in 2007.

Last year, the company secured new funding of $12 billion -- the biggest syndicated loan in Taiwan history -- as part of efforts to pay off earlier loans.

A build-operate-transfer formula adopted for the railway charged the corporation with constructing and running the line for 35 years before handing it to the government.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 10:54 AM   #166
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Thu, Jun 30, 2011
Rail passes assessment to add more trips
Taipei Times
By Lee I-chia / Staff Reporter



A proposal by Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp, the operator of the nation’s high-speed rail, to increase the maximum number of train trips that can be made on special high-load days to 210 a day passed an environmental impact -assessment yesterday.

The Environmental Protection Administration gathered environmental impact assessment specialists to discuss the impact of increasing the number of runs on high-load days, such as during Lunar New Year or on election day.

A previous assessment had set a limit of 175 runs a day.

In addition to evaluating noise pollution and carbon emissions, the specialists assessed land subsidence along the high-speed rail line, especially in Yunlin and Changhua counties.

Taiwan High Speed Rail said subsidence resulted from structural aspects that had already been evaluated before construction, adding that no irregular or unexpected subsidence had been observed over the past four years.

The company agreed to continue monitoring subsidence if the number of trains are increased.

The specialists told the panel they all agreed that adding to the number of trains would have a positive impact by reducing carbon emissions and that the immediate threat of land subsidence remained unproven and required further monitoring.

However, the specialists asked the company to provide clear and specific measures on how it intends to monitor the environmental impact if the numbers of train trips is increased to more than 175 per day.

The specialists asked the operator to provide a clear definition of “high-load days” to better regulate when adding train trips might be permitted.
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Old September 6th, 2011, 09:07 AM   #167
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Tue, Sep 06, 2011
THSRC app to let patrons use smartphone as ticket
Taipei Times Excerpt

Passengers on the high-speed rail will soon be able to use their smartphones as a ticket, Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSRC) said yesterday.

The company said it was scheduled to test run the system next month, adding that the smartphone ticket service could become available to the public in November.

Based on its plan, passengers would first have to download the ticketing application with their smartphones and use the app to book tickets.

They would receive a quick response code (QR code) when the transaction is complete. They will then be able to quickly pass through the ticket gates by placing their smartphones near the sensors on the ticket gates, which would scan the QR code.

Meanwhile, the board of THSRC recently approved a resolution authorizing the company to negotiate the purchase of new trains from Japan.

THSRC said the plan was raised to help cope with the increase in passenger numbers, which could reach 145,000 a day between 2013 and 2014.

The company made a profit of about NT$2 billion (US$68.8 million) in the first half of this year after suffering financial losses since the service began in 2006.

***

The company was given the exclusive right to run the high-speed rail system for 35 years, including the construction time.

Ou said that 35 years is too short. He cited examples of build-operate-transfer (BOT) projects such as the Regent Taipei Hotel and the Channel Tunnel between the UK and France, which were given concession periods of 50 years and 99 years respectively.

***

Current government regulations require BOT contractors to pay off their loans within the concession period.
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Old September 7th, 2011, 10:46 PM   #168
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THSR is loosing money ? really ?
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Old September 8th, 2011, 02:37 AM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aenelia View Post
THSR is loosing money ? really ?
Yeah, apparently the interest payments, taxes, and depreciation eat up any operating profit the system generates.
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Old September 12th, 2011, 05:10 PM   #170
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I am not surprised. I think the government must just put some money into it to make it feasible to operate. The BOT method is good but interest is too high on the THSR
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Old September 13th, 2011, 12:32 AM   #171
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Really saddening I love tshr IMHO it's the most beautiful of all high speed trains
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Old November 8th, 2011, 07:30 PM   #172
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Hey guys,

I've been lurking on this site for quite some time now; although I know that technically a post here is a necro, I feel that the information that I learned today is worthwhile. Here is a video:



THSR Hsinchu Station's rail link to downtown Hsinchu opened less than 24 hours ago. The Liujia Line was built because Hsinchu Station, like many other THSR stations, was built actually very far away from the city core. The station is nearly 12 kilometers away and is actually built in a suburb northeast across the river, in Jhubei (竹北).

The light rail link is expected to increase connectivity between the THSR station and the surrounding suburbs, as well as the world famous Hsinchu Science Park, which produces most of the world's computer chips. I'm personally very excited because there is light rail station less than a few blocks away from my house - within 10 minutes' walking distance.


I love high speed rail. When I was younger and had more time, I would often bike into the mountains behind the Science Park and watch trains for hours. Here are some personal photos I took by the trackside:







Oh, and here is a really rare shot I got of the driver's cabin back in '07.


EDIT: Thanks for pointing out the technical misnaming, Blackraven.

Last edited by Silver Swordsman; December 3rd, 2011 at 11:04 AM.
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Old November 20th, 2011, 04:20 PM   #173
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Fri, Nov 18, 2011
Plans for new high-speed rail stations on schedule
Taipei Times

Plans to construct high-speed rail stations in Miaoli, Changhwa and Yunlin are proceeding according to schedule, the Ministry of Transportation and Communications yesterday said yesterday, adding that the plans were finalized in a contract signed by the Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSRC) and the ministry.

The project came under media scrutiny when Premier Wu Den-yih (吳敦義) asked the ministry to communicate with THSRC shareholders, saying that some of them had opposed the construction of these stations.

Wu said the THSRC faced severe financial pressure two years ago and was able to continue operations only because the government helped it secure bank loans. The government will not allow these shareholders to oppose the project, Wu said, adding that they would make enemies of passengers in Miaoli, Changhwa and Yunlin if they continued to resist the plan.

Former THSRC vice president of public affairs Arthur Chiang (江金山), a THSRC board member, published a half-page advertisement in local newspapers yesterday asking Wu to “calm down,” saying there was no such thing as shareholder “opposition to the project.”

However, he asked why such a major project could not be discussed or put to a vote in a shareholders’ meeting.

“If the government demanded that THSRC accept the ‘script’ it has produced to garner more votes without any negotiations, if the three stations turned out to be investments from which the company cannot generate any return when the contract expires, can’t the shareholders ask questions? Can’t the government and THSRC work together to stipulate a construction plan that benefits society, the government and THSRC shareholders?” Chiang asked.

In response, Bureau of High Speed Rail Director-General Chu Shu (朱旭) yesterday said the project was listed as an item that must be executed by THSRC in its contract with the government.

The fund needed to build these three stations was already included the credit loans to THSRC when the government helped the company restructured its debs in 2009, which topped NT$7.55 billion, he said.

Chu said the company has submitted an execution guideline in July last year, which stated the construction would begin July next year and complete in 2015.
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Old November 26th, 2011, 07:10 PM   #174
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@Silver Swordsman

Hsinchu Light Rail? No such thing exists (even on wikipedia).......unless you're referring to this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liujia_Line
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Old November 28th, 2011, 10:07 AM   #175
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Updated Thursday, November 24, 2011 0:27 am
Wandering goat results in delay to high-speed train
CNA

TAIPEI--A southbound bullet train heading from Taipei to Kaohsiung was delayed by 15 minutes Tuesday after hitting a goat that had inexplicably found its way onto the high-speed rail's tracks, the Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp. (THSRC) said.

No damage or casualties were reported in the accident except for a minor injury suffered by the animal, said company spokesman Chang Yung-hsiung.

The accident took place at 4:03 p.m. near the line's 103-kilometer mark in Miaoli County's Zaociao township. The driver stopped the train immediately to check out the situation, and he made sure the train was not damaged before continuing the journey, he said.

Chang said THSRC will look into how the animal found its way onto the railway's tracks, which are protected from intrusions by fences.

The animal, which suffered a minor injury to its left leg, has been returned to its owner, he added.
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Old November 30th, 2011, 01:15 PM   #176
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I have to wonder what is it with Taiwan HSR and animals.

A few months ago there was a monkey at Zuoying who got shocked. A train hits a goat.

And I caught this on camera around 10-12 km south of Hsinchu:



The dog wasn't hurt, but like the officials, I'm still wondering how it got in to begin with.
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Old December 1st, 2011, 06:25 AM   #177
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Everywhere covered with dog poo, now....
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Old December 2nd, 2011, 05:16 AM   #178
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OK convenience stores to offer high-speed rail tickets
Taipei Times
Tue, Nov 29, 2011

Starting today, passengers on the high-speed rail can purchase tickets at OK Mart convenience stores, Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSRC) announced yesterday.

The same service is already being offered at FamilyMart, 7-Eleven and Hi-life. With the fourth convenience store chain coming on board, the high-speed rail will expand its number of access points for ticket sales from 8,500 to 9,300 venues nationwide.

THSRC said passengers could book their tickets through the “OK Go” Multimedia Kiosk at OK Mart stores, pay for them at the counter and receive the tickets on the same day. The service is available 24 hours.

Unlike competitors that charge a service fee of NT$10 per ticket, OK Mart will charge NT$8. From today until Dec. 12, customers will pay no transaction fee. Meanwhile, passengers can receive one free bottle of tea for each transaction from today until Dec. 26.

THSRC statistics show that about 8.46 million tickets have been sold through convenience stores since the service started 18 months ago, with an average of 13,000 tickets sold per day.

Meanwhile, the Taiwan Railway Administration said that passengers would be able to pick up tickets at convenience stores after booking them online by the end of this year.

The nation’s largest railway system has been planning to offer the service for more than three years, but problems related to service charges kept it from finalizing the deal with the stores.

Published on Taipei Times :
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiw.../29/2003519500
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Old January 13th, 2012, 03:15 PM   #179
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Old January 14th, 2012, 09:57 AM   #180
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Fri, Jan 13, 2012
High-speed rail can stop monitoring for birds: authorities
Published on Taipei Times : http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiw.../13/2003523136

Members of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Committee yesterday agreed to allow Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSRC) to stop monitoring for pheasant-tailed jacana along the route of the high-speed rail, saying that the ensuing preservation project should be conducted by the Council of Agriculture and Greater Tainan Government.

“THSRC must continue its care and support for the preservation of pheasant-tailed jacanas as part of its corporate responsibility,” the committee ruled.

The monitoring project was one of the promises that the rail operator made to secure approval for rail construction from the EIA.

The EIA committee members yesterday focused on the monitoring efforts in Hulupi (葫蘆埤) and Deyuanpi (德元埤) in Greater Tainan last year, the final two monitoring spots along the high-speed rail route. The project was executed by the Taiwan Development Institute, which was entrusted by THSRC to carry out the task. Researchers found that while Hulupi had seen a slight decrease in the number of pheasant-tailed jacanas compared with 2010, the number in Deyuanpi had increased.

Though the number of jacanas spotted in the Tainan area dwindled from 1,038 in 2006 to 478 last year, the study showed that more jacanas appeared after the high-speed rail began operations than when it was under construction.

Commenting on the decline in Hulupi, the researchers said a large number of jacanas were found dead in December 2010 after consuming rice poisoned by chemicals. However, the number rebounded in May last year thanks to eco-parks along the railway established by THSRC as well as incentives used to encourage farmers to grow water caltrops, one of the foods that jacanas consume.

The researchers added that they found more jacanas returned to habitats along the high-speed rail route, proving that noise created by the high-speed rail had little effect.
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