daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 7th, 2006, 11:19 PM   #181
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 26

- edit
wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 22nd, 2006, 12:32 AM   #182
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...ck=1&cset=true

Ando takes down-to-earth, witty look at architecture

By Blair Kamin

Tribune architecture critic
Published November 20, 2006

Competition for U. of C. project

Five heavyweight architectural firms will be in Chicago on Monday and Tuesday as they compete for the plum job of designing the University of Chicago's creative and performing arts center.

The five are Hans Hollein of Vienna; Studio Daniel Libeskind of New York City; Morphosis of Los Angeles; Fumihiko Maki and Associates of Tokyo; and Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects of New York.

Hollein, Maki and Thom Mayne of Morphosis are winners of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Libeskind is best known as the master planner of the World Trade Center site. Williams and Tsien are highly regarded for such projects as the American Folk Art Museum in New York.

The proposed $100 million creative and performing arts center would be on the south side of the Midway Plaisance, housing the full range of the arts, including a 350-seat performance hall.

The architects are to show drawings and models of their designs in a private session to the jury, which is composed of university administrators and faculty. The winner is to be announced early next year.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2006, 02:25 AM   #183
HowardL
Registered User
 
HowardL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 247
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagotom View Post
So I popped by today to size up the installation and I thought it was brilliant. It was absolutely nothing like what I expected. It does require a little thought to really get it, but it's well impressive.

The density of the pieces varies across the installation. The best part for me was being in the densest bit. From a little distance, it looks as if the figures are placed too tightly to navigate in between them, and I suppose for a majority or the larger asses in America, it's a proper barrier, but once in the thick of it, you realize that you aren't as alone as you thought you would be. You keep encountering others who were in there too, only slightly out of view for the moment. Even with 100+ sculptures, I would have liked it even more with three times as many. It was proper childlike fun, to keep "finding" strangers in the thicket.

In reading the Trib's review, it sounded sort of monumental and maybe even overpowering, but it's really rather intimate. If we get the Olympics, they'd look rather sassy if dolled up for each country. Something like that. Headless, armless representations that they are.

Oh, right, and it does rather need a tighter context. Sort of floats on the lawn right now. I'd say either buck up for another 200 sculptures or do some proper design so it has some edge. It's a great little place right now, but it doesn't quite engage the city yet. Love the **** out of it. It has the potential to be massive.
HowardL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2006, 02:55 AM   #184
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

Are there any plans to spruce up the installation in the future, like lighting or benches? That might add quite a bit as well.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2006, 09:35 PM   #185
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

http://www.nearwestgazette.com/update1206.htm

Last ABLA residents gone; museum considered
Susan S. Stevens


Chicago’s oldest housing project, the low-rise Jane Addams Homes in ABLA, is vacant after 69 years of sheltering low-income residents. Built in 1937, they were intended to last 60 years.

The last of what had once been 990 families in the Addams Homes part of ABLA moved Oct. 27, said Karen Pride, assistant press secretary for the Chicago Housing Authority. In the week leading up to the total shutdown, 14 families were relocated, she said. The moves had been delayed to allow the families to remain in the area; some moved into the Brooks Homes.

All but possibly one building will be demolished in the coming months to make room for mixed-income housing in the Roosevelt Square development. The structure that may remain is the two-towered power plant at Taylor Street, which may become a public housing museum. Deverra Beverly, president of the Local Advisory Council for ABLA Homes, has been working to create a museum and negotiating with deep-pocketed allies to preserve the power plant for that purpose.

“Once we get some answers, we will know where we are going,” Beverly said.

The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, which funds small museums and other civic and artistic projects, has enlisted museum experts to make suggestions for the public housing museum.

If the museum moves forward, it might use only part of the power plant complex. “We are thinking we maybe don’t need as much of the building as we thought earlier,” Beverly said.

spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2006, 09:39 PM   #186
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

http://www.nearwestgazette.com/Archi...story12062.htm

Children's Museum still looking for a home
By Marie Balice Ward


Controversy continues to envelop the Chicago Children’s Museum’s relocation, as two proposed sites have met with opposition.

In June, museum President Peter England announced at a Grant Park Advisory Council/Grant Park Conservancy (GPAC/GPC) meeting that Daley Bicentennial Plaza’s field house area east of Michigan Avenue on Randolph Street was deemed the best new location for the museum.

In moving there, the museum would have rebuilt the field house, which is in dire need of renovation, at its own expense and incorporated it into the new site. Of the location’s 325 acres, 20,000 square feet would have remained Chicago Park District property; the remainder would have held a 95,000 square foot museum and 5,000 square feet to be shared with the field house and an ice rink. Also, the museum would have housed field house and ice rink services and operations.

Alderman Burt Natarus reportedly received complaints about the plan, as did Chicago Park District spokesperson Jessica Maxey Faulkner.

Then, at an October press conference, England unexpectedly announced the museum would relocate to the southeast corner of Monroe Street and Columbus Drive in Grant Park instead. He noted it would be renamed the Chicago Children’s Museum at Allstate Place to reflect a reported $15 million contribution from Allstate Insurance.

Museum leadership had high hopes for the second site and still would like to build there, but GPAC/GPA and several other business and civic organizations have deemed it unsuitable for a variety of reasons.

At a mid-October community meeting, the majority of attendees spoke against the Monroe Street location. Bob O’Neill, GPAC/GPC president, said he had received an overwhelming number of e-mails opposing the idea, mainly because it would “hard-scape” Grant Park, meaning the museum would be a non-green area within the park.

'Dangerous precedent'

“It would set a dangerous precedent,” O’Neill said. “Subsequently, it would be difficult to deny other institutions from building within the Grant Park property, and there would be an unacceptable loss of green space at this particular area.”

Several community members, including Louis D’Angelo, said at the October meeting they believed political pressure and “political expediency” brought the Monroe Street choice under consideration. He added he has reviewed the Grant Park Framework Plan and believes erecting a building within the park is not allowed.

Other groups, including Friends of Downtown, Friends of the Parks, Chicago Loop Alliance (formerly Greater State Street Council), Open Lands Projects, and the Metropolitan Planning Council, joined GPAC/GPA in opposing the Grant Park location.

“These groups unanimously agree that the new proposed location for the Chicago Children’s Museum is illegal, is contrary to the Montgomery Ward’s court decisions (Oct. 16, 1890) regarding green space, violates the Lakefront Protection Ordinance, and would set a bad precedent for building permanent structures within Grant Park grounds,” stated O’Neill.

“We are scheduling meetings with the Mayor, with Alderman Burt Natarus, with the Chicago Park District, and, of course, with the Chicago Children’s Museum to reach an agreement as to the location of the expanded museum,” O’Neill explained. “We will continue working toward maintaining communication with all parties involved.

“Grant Park Advisory Council and Grant Park Conservancy believe the location at the current Daley Bicentennial Plaza would be ideal for the Chicago Children’s Museum, but not all of the other groups are in agreement about where the museum should be located. However, everyone firmly believes that the Monroe Street at Columbus Drive site is unsuitable.” O’Neill plans to hold additional community meetings on the subject.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2006, 01:28 AM   #187
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

http://www.dailysouthtown.com/news/1...43nws3.article

'This area is almost forgotten'

Heiress' hope to help low-income neighborhoods may bring Salvation Army to South Side

December 4, 2006
By Courtney Greve
Staff writer

The application for a proposed Salvation Army community center on Chicago's South Side filled a pair of six-ring binders.

"It's extensive," Col. David Grindel, the Salvation Army's divisional commander, said of the 1,800-page document. "Only hospitals do as much in-depth planning."

Nearly 30 months after announcing plans for the Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, approval is expected in January for the project in the city's West Pullman community that will cost about $127.5 million to build and endow.

"This center will impact a wide-ranging area of need and provide huge opportunities for literally thousands of people," Grindel said.

Construction could begin as soon as fall 2007 at the 29-acre site -- a vacant lot and overgrown park -- near 119th and Loomis streets just east of Interstate 57, he said.

"This area is almost forgotten," Grindel said. "It's a working man's neighborhood with great people. They are a proud people, but they lack opportunity."

About 250 jobs will be created at the center, which will provide after-school programs, adult education and job training. An estimated 2,500 people are expected to use the center daily, Grindel said.

The center will include a 2,000-seat auditorium, a field house with three full-size basketball courts, outdoor athletic fields and an aquatic center with a fun park and 25-meter swimming pool, Grindel said.

A bowling alley and ice rink could be added later, he said.

The bulk of the project will be financed with $90 million from the estate of McDonald's heiress Joan Kroc, who left the Salvation Army $1.5 billion in her will for community centers to be built in low-income neighborhoods.

The money will be evenly divided for construction and operating costs. An additional $22.5 million must be raised for the center's endowment and at least another $15 million for construction, Grindel said.

Green roofs and energy-saving systems will be used in the center's buildings, Grindel said.

The center initially was slated to be built at 47th and State streets next to the Robert Taylor Homes in the Bronzeville neighborhood.

When Ald. Dorothy Tillman (3rd) said she wanted a retail development at the site, the Salvation Army looked at another 27 locations before settling on West Pullman.

"Many (sites) were too small, not available or did not meet our criteria for an area that lacked opportunities," Grindel said.

The Salvation Army held several community meetings to get input about the project.

"The general perception is that the money runs out before it hits 85th Street and never reaches the neighborhoods on the far South Side," he said.

"The only thing the South Side lacks is opportunity," he said. "Give them opportunity and families can accomplish a lot."
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 9th, 2006, 07:55 AM   #188
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,935
Likes (Received): 21

http://www.suntimes.com/entertainmen...-art06.article
Mexican art museum gets a new name

December 6, 2006
BY KEVIN NANCE Art Critic
After two decades of steady growth in Chicago's Pilsen neighborhood, the Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum is celebrating its 20th anniversary by changing its name to the National Museum of Mexican Art.
The switch is intended to reflect the museum's status as the nation's largest Latino arts organization and the only Latino museum accredited by the American Association of Museums, along with the fact that it now has annual attendance of more than 200,000 from more than 60 countries.

"We have been doing things on a national level for a while now," said museum president and founder Carlos Tortolero. "On a recent trip to Mexico, we mentioned our new name to colleagues, and their response was, 'It's about time.' "

Cesareo Moreno, the museum's visual arts director, agreed. "The change is finally acknowledging all the work we've been doing the last 20 years. 'Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum' is a great name, but it more accurately reflects the beginning 20 years ago. The new name recognizes what we have become."

What the museum has become is a force to be reckoned with. Its permanent collection is one of the five largest collections of Mexican art in the country. Sixteen of the museum's exhibitions have toured -- six of them to Mexico, including "The African Presence in Mexico," which opened in Monterey last month.

"We are very proud of our Mexican history and culture, and we want to share that on an international level," Moreno said. "We celebrate a culture without borders."

At the same time, he said, the museum will maintain its strong connection to its neighborhood, to Chicago and to the city's community of Latino artists. "They're the foundation on which we're built."

The museum's 2007 anniversary event schedule includes a new exhibit of traditional Mayan textiles, "Arte Textil Maya: Collections of the Centro de Textiles del Mundo Maya," opening Jan. 19.
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 11th, 2006, 06:37 AM   #189
Loopy
Chicago, USA
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 777
Likes (Received): 0

..

Last edited by Loopy; June 18th, 2010 at 11:14 PM.
Loopy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 21st, 2006, 12:52 AM   #190
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

Awesome article behind the Comer Youth Center

http://www.metropolismag.com/cda/story.php?artid=2420

Miracle on 72nd Street
Gary Comer and John Ronan create a stunning citadel of hope on Chicago’s troubled South Side.

By John Hockenberry

Posted December 6, 2006

If you meander southward from the glittering architectural trophy case that is the Chicago lakefront, you pass by (and under) the vast steel rectangles of McCormick Place and the Ionic columns of the Field Museum. Farther south you come upon the domed nineteenth-century Beaux Arts palace housing the Museum of Science and Industry. Turn west and the landscape quickly becomes a low-rise wasteland of crime and shabby retail. Stores promise easy credit for ghastly furniture. Carryout food is prepared behind thick panels of bulletproof glass. Every street has a liquor store. Vacant lots punctuate an alarming streetscape of poorly constructed box residences and the occasional brownstone holdout. A multifamily building on 72nd Street South stands blackened and vacant from a recent fire. The bitter smell of burnt plastic still lingers in the air, and the building’s exterior vinyl siding has been warped into the sagging signature of old Venetian blinds.

As you pass the fortress of Paul Revere Elementary School, where a man was recently arrested for child abduction and public indecency, the view abruptly changes: 72nd Street appears to dead-end into a wall mosaic of colored panels. Surrounded by grim warehouses and a couple of solo boarded-up buildings with moats of weeds and garbage stands a three-story apparition of whimsical-looking bricks that might have been conjured by some child daydreaming of Lego blocks. An 80-foot tower with a moving LED display spells out messages in colored lights. As you get close you can see slitlike recessed windows, but it’s difficult to tell what is going on inside until you enter the double doors, check in with tough but friendly Sam at the security desk, and take a few steps into a multitiered atrium of absolute magic.

Nothing can quite prepare you for a visit to the Gary Comer Youth Center, named for the man who paid for its construction, the billionaire founder of catalog retailer Lands’ End. The center opened this summer on the site of an abandoned warehouse at the corner of 72nd Street South, Ingleside, and South Chicago Avenue. Designed by local architect John Ronan, the building is an arresting, alluring mystery by day. (Taxis frequently stop to ask pedestrians, “What the hell is this thing?”) By night it’s a warmly lit gathering place for a neighborhood that for decades has known only fear after dark. The facility is so beyond any familiar notion of a “youth center,” YMCA, or Boys’ Club, that it takes some getting used to. It is discreetly secure, as bulletproof as any neighborhood mini-mart, but this is no bunker. As modern as a contemporary art museum, it still manages to retain a casual human scale.

Its structure is formidable, built for constant use, not occasional visits. A steel frame holds massive trusses that allow high ceilings all around and support large skylights and a freestanding roof garden with more than 18 inches of soil and a full irrigation system. The structure is concealed behind walls and exterior surfaces decorated with festive and sophisticated graphics—but make no mistake, this building is designed to do battle with the forces of neglect and vandalism much in evidence on these streets. So far it seems to be winning: there is not a spot of graffiti anywhere. Perhaps the most amazing quality of the building is how radical it is on every level. It is the only new construction of any kind for years in this part of Chicago.

No timid trial-balloon seed development, the $30 million facility boldly announces its intention to be here a century from now. This neighborhood, called Grand Crossing, was in January the largest in Chicago without a public library. Today it boasts an architectural landmark as distinct in its own way as Sears Tower.

Comer attended Paul Revere Elementary School 70 years ago, when the neighborhood was a polyglot immigrant community whose labor fueled Chi-cago’s industrial expansion and was hit hard by the Great Depression. After the success of Lands’ End, he became one of Chicago’s biggest local philanthropists, focusing his resources on the streets and parks where he once played without any thought of bullets or gangs. Comer’s three giant gifts, totaling more than $84 million, to the nearby University of Chicago Medical Center established a children’s hospital, a specialty-care facility, and a mobile pediatric unit for the neighborhood, but he yearned to get closer to the streets of his childhood. He walked them alone back in the late 1990s to get a feel for the needs of Grand Crossing, which then had a 55 percent dropout rate and one of the highest levels of violent crime in the city. With the quiet expertise of a retailer observing his customers, Comer studied the area until a plan began to form. One afternoon in 2003 this newly street-smart entrepreneur of change took his then modest plan to an architect.

Ronan can clearly recall the day when an unassuming elderly man stopped by his firm’s hip offices in Chicago’s River North. “He was just a nice guy with an idea for a building,” he says. “I was on the phone when he came in and made him wait for about five minutes, and I never do that. I had no idea who he was. He was wearing a sweater and khakis from Lands’ End, but I didn’t put anything together.” Eventually Ronan did, but he’s still reeling with amazement over what the project became. Although he has a solid portfolio of buildings under way around the world, the architect comes close to matching Comer’s unassuming style. He even quickly disavows a widely reported story that Comer was attracted to him because, unlike other big-name architects, Ronan answers his own phones. “That’s just a rumor,” he says with a twisted modesty. “I answer my own phones, but that’s not why Gary picked me.”

Modest or not, the collaboration between Comer and Ronan has produced what Chicago architect Brad Lynch calls the most transformative building to be constructed in the city in at least a decade. “The center does everything superior architecture is supposed to do,” Lynch says. “And it’s not because of some dazzling Koolhaas- or Gehry-style design elements. It has already changed lives. You go down to that urban war zone and spend time in that building, and it goes bang. It’s that powerful.”

The idea that Comer originally brought to Ronan was much more humble than the multiuse complex standing at 72nd and Ingleside. The original plan was to make a practice facility for the 26-year-old South Shore Drill Team, a precision parade team famous for its steely discipline and spectacular synchronized rifle throws and spins. The team was founded by local educator Arthur Robertson to keep his brother from dropping out of school. Robertson’s kids are taught to pursue goals and stick together, and are required to maintain a C average. The award-winning drill team has performed all over the world—the Indy 500 Parade, gubernatorial inaugurations—but it had never had a home. Robertson had been scrounging for space for his expanding group for years.

“We sat down with them and said, ‘Hey, what do you want in this building? Because you can have anything you want,’ ” Ronan recalls. “They asked for really basic things like ‘a building with heat—that would be good.’ ” Comer kept asking Ronan to go beyond the basics, and the idea of a full-fledged youth center began to take shape. “One week it was a health clinic and then it was a preschool, and then that went out the window. It had this make-believe quality to it.” Three months into the project Ronan made up a laundry list, trying to pin Comer down, including some easy things like arts and crafts, a game room, and a library for homework. He also put in some things that were more out there, such as a recording studio, a computer lab, a fully wired lecture hall capable of broadcasting onto the Internet, a workout space, and a dance studio. Ronan gave the list to Comer and expected him to look it over and give him some feedback. Instead Comer decided on the spot to do it all.

“Usually somebody comes to you with a site and a program, and a budget way too small to do the program,” Ronan says. “Here we had no program. We could make it up ourselves. We could pick any site we wanted because Gary had basically bought up the whole neighborhood. Money was not an issue, ever. I mean it was like a school project or something. It was a dream.”

Comer’s dream was going to have some severe design limitations. An early mock-up with lots of exterior glass was unveiled before a community group and flopped. “Basically they told us they wanted no glass at all,” Ronan says. “‘Glass is impossible down here,’ they said.” So he devised thick concrete walls with colored panels, to keep the building from looking like a bunker. Ronan quietly added recessed windows of bulletproof glass and lots of skylights and interior glass to capture and diffuse all available daylight. Halfway into the design process Comer abruptly demanded a third floor to the building. Each addition increased Comer’s and Ronan’s passion for the project.

But there was something else driving this endeavor that Ronan discovered long after his first encounter with Comer. Midway through the project, the philanthropist was stricken with a recurrence of bone-marrow cancer. Ronan says he could feel the importance of the project to Comer as the months passed and construction began. Although Comer never would explicitly say it, this project represented his legacy. “He gave a lot more money to the hospitals,” Ronan says. “But there it was just hand over a check and the doctors did the rest. Here Gary had a hand in all of it. His heart was really into this center.”

Comer created an endowment for the building to be maintained long after his death, and there is a long list of Chicago institutions eager to carry out programming and activities there. Pamela Bozeman-Evans, senior program director, left a job with the rising political star Senator Barak Obama to join the center. She says this is her first community-service job where fund-raising is not the primary responsibility. “This building is already a major player in the revitalization of the neighborhood. Just look around.”

When the building was dedicated in May, Comer was in a wheelchair, too weak to walk. “Isn’t this going to be the greatest thing for the kids?” he whispered to one of the local reporters who covered the event. Ronan says Comer had his hands in the critical details right up to the end. “I remember we showed him the color tiles for the outside not knowing what he would think, if he would even like them at all,” Ronan recalls wistfully. “He of course told us to make them brighter, bolder.”

On an October afternoon, kids begin wandering in from nearby schools to do homework at the clean tables in the cafeteria, where others are *getting a hot meal at the line up front. Above, windows all around reveal rooms for one-on-one tutoring, art classes, a library, a dance studio, workout equipment, a recording studio, and a computer lab. Through a wall of glass, visitors peer down into the building’s centerpiece, a beautiful gymnasium (which converts with the push of a button into a 640-seat theater), and watch three groups of boys and girls playing basketball. On the roof the working garden is still producing some late crops destined for a culinary-arts class. Everywhere is color, warmth, smiles, and laughter. The multilevel see-through interior seems to create an infectious *factory of work and play where anything could happen. As I look around only boredom seems an implausible activity here.

“This place is clean and fun, and you can do activities here, not just sit around and watch TV,” 11-year-old Marc Franklin says, munching on some chicken while explaining that his favorite activities involve the game room and homework help. A crowd gathers. Everyone is eager to explain to a stranger what this building means to them. “It’s clean and nice and important-*looking—that’s why nobody puts graffiti here,” 12-year-old Tyrenza Stevenson explains, until Marc suddenly interrupts her: “It’s like you don’t worry about getting shot over here. That’s the main thing.” He’s stocky and a little sensitive about his weight, which he blames partly on spending too much time in his house, off the dangerous streets. “I plan to slim down,” Marc says. “They have treadmills and all kinds of weights and things for exercising.”

The subject shifts to what people want to be when they grow up. They all chatter at once, but there’s no boastful thuggery, no references to video games and hip-hop celebrities, or other typical preteen acting out. The talk around these tables ranges far and wide, as though the building has quietly given them permission, as though it’s suddenly OK to dream. The kids are excited but not overawed by this place. They speak of it as something they deserve to have, not some outlandish, intimidating piece of good fortune. A member of the drill team says, “This building is here because we were so determined, and that’s what got us noticed.” It’s an attitude that suggests that the center will be around for a long time. Every kid knows about the man who made it possible. “We love Mr. Comer,” they say, even though none of them has the faintest idea what Lands’ End might be. “Mr. Gary Comer used to live around here and wanted to do something to make the neighborhood better,” Tyrenza says. “He sure enough did that,” Marc says confidently. “If I was really rich I would put a youth center in every neighborhood.”

Comer died in early October at the age of 78. Ronan says one of his last appearances was in September by video link to a live performance of the radio show A Prairie Home Companion in the center’s theater. “You should have seen it,” Ronan says. “Kid volunteers were parking cars. The drill team was fantastic.” It was a thrilling experience to see a building that he designed so alive and bringing people from all over the city to a neighborhood they never knew existed. He speaks reverently of the client who walked into his office out of the blue and changed his life. “I consider myself lucky to have found Gary Comer, but he lucked out to get me,” the architect says quietly with a fierce emotional pride. “He trusted me, and he was right.” Outside as night falls, the interior lights of the youth center spill warmth out onto what were very recently mean streets. On the tower above the center the lights spell out a somber message: “Thank you Gary Comer.” This newest detail on Chicago’s skyline can be seen for miles.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 4th, 2007, 04:13 AM   #191
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

http://www.chicagoreader.com/feature...siness/061229/

Bought, Sold, Still on Hold

Updates on some unfinished arts biz

By Deanna Isaacs

December 29, 2006

BEFORE WE KISS off 2006, here’s a checkup on some of the year’s loose ends—deals finally done, controversies gone cold, mysteries still unsolved.


THE DUNCAN YMCA Chernin Center for the Arts, created less than a decade ago in a burst of optimism about the bonding and earning power of the arts, was sold this week to its neighbor, Saint Ignatius High School. It was never on the open market. Metro Y spokesperson Lee Concha said she was unable to release the price at press time, but noted that proceeds from the sale will be used for general programming at other locations. The Center, at Roosevelt and Morgan, got an 11,000-square-foot addition eight years ago that included a state-of-the-art 220-seat theater and scenery shop as well as dance, recording, and art studios. Funded by the Chernin and MacArthur foundations, among others, the Duncan Y was intended to bridge class boundaries in the rapidly changing neighborhood (near UIC) and provide arts training for kids citywide. Word on the street is the building was never properly managed; in recent years, as its real estate value rose, there was noticeable neglect. But YMCA officials said the facility just didn’t take: in Concha’s words, “we built it and they didn’t come.” The center officially closes after the final performance of Congo Square Theatre Company’s Black Nativity, on December 31.

AFTER MONTHS OF e-mailed distress signals about its impending homelessness, the Chicago Photography Center got over the hump and purchased its space at 3301 N. Lincoln last week for $1.2 million. It’s a milestone for the group, which formed after Hull House effectively booted Richard Stromberg’s program four years ago. But don’t look for the cash call to stop anytime soon. CPC board secretary Roger Rudich says Friends of the CPC, an ad hoc corporation of about 20 do-gooder investors, put up $360,000 for a down payment on the two-floor commercial condo. That money is due to be paid back with 5 percent interest in five years—and it’s not likely to be raised solely in class and rental fees. Rudich says they expect to secure a significant portion through “a major fund-raising campaign in planning right now.”


THE THREE ARTS Club is officially on the block. Development and marketing director Mark Becker says the Gold Coast landmark was listed in October with Cushman & Wakefield, and broker Brian Pohl says he expects to close a deal worth $13 to $15 million within the next 60 days. The board’s loopy plan to turn the legendary residence for women in the arts into a cultural center (with a new home for TimeLine Theatre to be dug out under the courtyard) and “affordable” condos for a few fortunate artists was scuttled after city officials held up funding earlier this year. Now Becker says proceeds from the sale will help turn Three Arts—which has always been all about its physical presence—into that most ephemeral of entities, a grant-making foundation. Former residents, who said from the get-go that the changes wrought by this board would result in the loss of Three Arts’s primary mission and the transfer of the building to a developer, aren’t surprised.


BY THE TIME WBEZ unveiled its new schedule earlier this month the protest against its threatened mass dump of music programming (which included an online petition with 4,600 signatures) had faded to a whimper. In the new lineup, which launches January 8, Afropop Worldwide and Passport survive, airing once a week on Fridays, and Dick Buckley’s Sunday gig is reduced to one hour. Other nighttime music programs have been replaced by reruns of Eight Forty-Eight, Worldview, Fresh Air, and the inane Wait Wait . . . Don’t Tell Me! Disgruntled listeners like local blues musician Matthew Skoller say there’s no consolation in this schedule for supporters of the music that’s indigenous to Chicago: “It’ll have an effect on the clubs and the musicians who work in them.” Still pending: the exact shape of what’s being touted as radical new programming on Chicago Public Radio’s recently juiced up second frequency, WBEW. Initially conceived as the place where all the music would go, it now looks to be another entry in the burgeoning realm of DIY media. Due to launch in April, its format is still under discussion at secretradioproject.com.


THEATER ON THE Lake artistic director Hallie Gordon says 2007 will see a renewed push to promote and restore the dilapidated 300-seat lakefront treasure. Friends of Theater on the Lake—a group of about 20, looking for more—had their first meeting in October. They’ve already heard from architect John Morris, whose plans for a $6 million renovation that would enclose the theater in glass have been on the shelf for nearly two years now. “These people are passionate about Theater on the Lake,” says Gordon. “It’s more than just a theater to them—it’s a long-standing tradition, and they want to make sure it continues.” The group’s next meeting is slated for 6 PM January 16 at the Margate Park field house, 4921 N. Marine Drive; call 312-742-7994 or e-mail adtotl at gmail.com for more info.

MUSEUM OF BROADCAST Communications president Bruce DuMont says this could be a golden moment for Governor Rod Blagojevich: now that he’s got four more years in Springfield, he could step forward and release funds DuMont says the state has promised the museum. That would allow construction to resume on MBC’s future home on State Street, which has been standing halfdone since May, and solve the catch-22 DuMont’s been battling: he can’t get the building finished without donations, but he can’t get donations while the construction’s stalled. “We have clarification in writing [from the state] calling for us to raise an additional $7 million before they’ll release the $6 million they promised,” DuMont says, but the boarded-up building is a “psychological block for potential donors.” His offer to name the museum “in perpetuity” for anyone who coughs up the whole $7 million still stands. Meanwhile, he says, CBS Chicago has committed half a million and the Cox Foundation has come through with $100,000. A freight elevator will be installed in January and work on exhibits is “going forward.” DuMont says the museum could open eight months after construction resumes.


LOOKS LIKE THE Merchandise Mart and Art Chicago won’t have to worry about a competing art fair at Navy Pier in 2007; DMG World Media has pulled the plug on its plan to hire a director and mount what producer Mark Lyman had said would be a “world-class show” at the Pier. Lyman says that after polling a number of key dealers internationally, DMG decided the best thing for Chicago would be to “sit tight a bit and let time take care of some things.” a Gay Games Chicago is still looking to raise about $25,000 to close the gap on its $8.8 million cash budget through donations (to be matched by an anonymous benefactor) and proceeds from the Gay Games VII DVD. The final financial report won’t be out until March. Meanwhile, Repent America has filed a civil suit against the city, charging that the rights of three volunteers were violated when they were arrested during demonstrations at Gay Games events. A motion by the city to dismiss the charges was denied earlier this month.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2007, 01:22 AM   #192
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...,5493389.story

Columbia College Chicago has picked four finalists for the college's proposed media production center, including Santa Monica, Calif.-based Morphosis, whose principal Thom Mayne won the 2005 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Two Chicago firms are among the finalists: Studio Gang, headed by Jeanne Gang; and Brininstool + Lynch, led by partners Brad Lynch and David Brininstool.

The fourth finalist is New York City-based Helfand Architecture, headed by Margaret Helfand.

A selection committee will meet with the finalists in February, asking them to discuss their design philosophies and other issues. A decision is expected in early March, according to a university spokeswoman.

The media production center is proposed to be built at the southwest corner of State and 16th Streets on a vacant lot now owned by the City of Chicago.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2007, 05:45 PM   #193
Chicagotom
Registered User
 
Chicagotom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 420
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy View Post
http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...,5493389.story

Columbia College Chicago has picked four finalists for the college's proposed media production center, including Santa Monica, Calif.-based Morphosis, whose principal Thom Mayne won the 2005 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

The media production center is proposed to be built at the southwest corner of State and 16th Streets on a vacant lot now owned by the City of Chicago.
This is great news for an area of the south loop that just can't seem to find its bearings. Investment of anykind on South State and Wabash is a good thing.
Chicagotom no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2007, 06:53 PM   #194
Loopy
Chicago, USA
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 777
Likes (Received): 0

..

Last edited by Loopy; June 20th, 2010 at 04:47 AM.
Loopy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 12th, 2007, 02:16 AM   #195
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

http://www.pioneerlocal.com/skylinen...107-s1.article

Theater on the Lake seeks new 'friends'

January 11, 2007
By FELICIA DECHTER Staff Writer


Love Lincoln Park's Theater on the Lake, 2401 N. Lake Shore Drive?

If so, you can get involved in its future by becoming a member of the newly-formed Friends of Theater on the Lake, whose next meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 16 at the Margate Park Fieldhouse, 4921 N. Marine Drive.

According to the theater's artistic director, Hallie Gordon, this is the first-ever Friends group for TOTL, comprised of Park District associates and theater subscribers. Gordon started Friends, "...because I realized that we already had a strong group of subscribers who are passionate about Theater on the Lake and want to help carry on the tradition of summer theater.

"This is incredibly important for the future of TOTL," said Gordon. "It will help raise awareness within the city, and the Park District and the community directly surrounding TOTL."

The Friends' goals for 2007 include improving the quality and mix of the season's line-up, increasing audience development and re-energizing patrons' experiences, and improving the cafe. In addition, according to Krista Bryzki Richard, program and event manager for the Park District, the Friends will also help raise funds for the $6.5 to $7 million theater renovation.

"This building is really falling apart," said Richard, also the theater's managing director. "It's got this great history, and it's quaint and it's old, and in a beautiful location. It has a campy, rustic charm, but it's still falling apart."

Theater on the Lake was built in 1920 as the Chicago Daily News Fresh Air Fund Sanitarium, a breezy building for babies recuperating from tuberculosis and other diseases. Built on landfill, the Prairie-style structure was designed by Dwight H. Perkins of Perkins, Fellows, and Hamilton, which also designed several Lincoln Park properties, including Cafe Brauer, the Lion House in the Lincoln Park Zoo, and North Pond Cafe.

The pavilion housed 250 basket baby cribs, nurseries, and rooms for older kids, and doctors and nurses contributed their services. Free health care, milk and lunches were provided to more than 30,000 children each summer until the sanitarium's 1939 closing.

During World War II, the building bustled as a USO Center for soldiers from Fort Sheridan and sailors from the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. When the war ended, then-popular barn dances were held.

In 1952, the space was converted into TOTL, showcasing productions staged by Park District community theater organizations. The open space on the building's south end was enclosed, productions were in the round, and audience members sat on canvas beach chairs.

The Park District operated costume and scene shops, but technical conditions were far from ideal, and any given performance could be interrupted by bats, bugs, motorcycles, bad mufflers and power outages.

In 1996, the Park District changed group's focus, and invited professional theater companies to remount their works. Today, some of the city's best-loved Off-Loop companies -- including Steppenwolf and Second City -- are showcased at the theater, which has about 800 subscribers.

According to Richard, two meetings have already been held by the Friends, and the group is seeking to come up with a mission statement and goals.

She added that the renovation focus will be the "beautiful location," but said that between the Lake Shore Drive ramp and cigarette boats on Lake Michigan, sound is also a big issue. Therefore, the revamp will include improving acoustics, as well as tuck-pointing, renovating bathrooms, and increasing seating from 331 seats to approximately 350-375.

The hope is also to move the theater's entrance to the lakeside, and the current lobby and green room--on the building's west side--would become backstage space. The plan could also include doors that could close, Richard said, and special events could also be held.

Although the Park District can help, it can't completely pay for the renovation, so Richard said the group is seeking contributions from foundations, individuals, and the government. After an open bidding process, the local John Morris Architects & Planners were chosen to do the work, with a "great plan to modernize and make the space as great as its programming," Richard said.

She added that the plan will maintain the theater's charm, and no work will be done until funds are raised. The work could be done in phases.

spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2007, 04:01 PM   #196
nomarandlee
My Mind Has Left My Body
 
nomarandlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: 1060 W. Addison, City by the Lake
Posts: 7,209
Likes (Received): 2761

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...,6148755.story

Lakefront bridge proposals are moving slowly

By Blair Kamin
Tribune architecture critic
Published January 31, 2007


There was optimism in the air two years ago when the City of Chicago held a lakefront pedestrian bridge competition and announced winners for five sites -- North Avenue, Lake Shore Drive at the Chicago River, 35th Street, 41st Street and 43rd Street.

Not much visible has happened since then, much to the relief of historic preservationists who want to save the existing North Avenue Bridge, a 1940s classic with an elongated steel arch. Meanwhile, just a year after introducing the idea, the Art Institute of Chicago in 2006 won city approval for a pedestrian bridge designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano that will span busy Monroe Drive. Private donors last year gave $14 million for the 620-foot-long bridge that will link the museum's under-construction Modern Wing with Millennium Park.

"Private pocketbooks are easier to pry open than public pocketbooks," said Brian Steele, a spokesman for the Chicago Department of Transportation, explaining the relatively slow pace of the city-sponsored bridges.

City transportation officials, it turns out, are grinding forward on the South Side pedestrian bridges selected in the design competition. They have commissioned preliminary engineering studies for those spans -- a curving, single-tower suspension bridge at 35th Street by Teng, a Chicago architectural and engineering firm, and a pair of S-shaped bridges for 41st and 43rd Streets by Chicago architects Cordogan, Clark & Associates.

The combined cost of the studies is about $2 million. Ground for these bridges may not be broken until 2009 or 2010, Steele said. Developers in the reviving North Kenwood and Oakland neighborhoods consider the new bridges crucial to improving lakefront access from the areas--and, thus, their real estate prospects.

Less clear is the fate of the other winning designs: the Lake Shore Drive pedestrian bridge, by Wight & Company with Edward Windhorst Architects, a moveable span that echoed historic Chicago River bridges with a single swooping truss, and a replacement North Avenue Bridge, by PSA-Dewberry's Chicago office, which called for a boldly curving profile inspired by sand dunes.

The city hasn't commissioned preliminary engineering studies for either bridge, Steele said, adding that they were always lower on the priority list than the South Side bridges.

The winning design for the Lake Shore Drive bridge, he added, does not rule out architect Santiago Calatrava's proposal for a towering, cable-stayed bridge at the same location because the city is not contractually obligated to build the competition winners. Calatrava included the bridge in his latest plans for the 2,000-foot Chicago Spire, which would rise nearby.

Saying that much has changed with the site, including the Chicago Spire proposal and the planned development of nearby DuSable Park, Steele said city officials would be open to reviewing Calatrava's concept. But so far, he added, "we simply don't have enough detail to know whether it's something to move forward with."

----------

[email protected]



Copyright © 2007, Chicago Tribune


Image in Tribune....
41rst and 43rd St. bridges
http://www.cordoganclark.com/project...43rd/page.html

Last edited by nomarandlee; January 31st, 2007 at 05:11 PM.
nomarandlee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2007, 08:11 PM   #197
Flubnut
4th Level of Hades
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 709
Likes (Received): 5

Aha! So that explains why the North Ave bridge is still standing, even though a temporary bridge has been in use for over 6 months.
Flubnut no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2007, 10:06 PM   #198
headcase
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 143
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flubnut View Post
Aha! So that explains why the North Ave bridge is still standing, even though a temporary bridge has been in use for over 6 months.
I think you are talking about two separate projects. You are referring to the North Ave bridge that crosses the river up by North/Clybourn corridor, right? The planned location of the vehicular suspension bridge? I don't know the hold up there, but I think they are talking about bridging LSD on the South end of Lincoln Park. I could be wrong, i wasn't really around when judging was done. But the article does say "pedestrian' bridges.

SSDD
__________________
He was constantly reminded of how startlingly different a place the world was when viewed from a point only three feet to the left.
headcase no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 2nd, 2007, 07:45 PM   #199
globill
Registered User
 
globill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: I'm going to Washington to serve the people of this country.
Posts: 1,739
Likes (Received): 8

Wow, Can't believe I missed this amazing thread!

After spending an hour on it, I want to offer a big thanks to spyguy!!, you rock. As an expat Chicagoan (of sorts) who spends only a couple of months a year back home, I had no idea about most of these projects.

Keep up the great work, very informative!
__________________
"in my little opinion it does matter what fairy tales some small time senator says to get elected, how fast he drops his associates that may harm him, and what is really behind it." nygirl

"I told you what I thought about that when I said I do not trust Obama and I probably never will. He hasnn't proven anything to me or you yet but he has flapped his lips plenty. And that I guess, is enough for some of you smarties in here." nygirl
globill no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2007, 12:59 AM   #200
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

^Thanks

http://blogs.chicagotribune.com/news...w_deal_sp.html

Broadcast museum needs own new deal

Eric Zorn


DuMont could use a new deal of his own right about now. His old deals - the ones he thought were in place to create a dazzling new shrine to the legacy of radio and television - aren't getting it done.

Mbc2 DuMont, a veteran local air personality and nephew of famed TV pioneer Allen B. DuMont, opened the Museum of Broadcast Communications in the Burnham Park neighborhood in 1987, moved to a wing of the Cultural Center downtown in 1992, then closed that space in late 2003 to prepare to move into a 70,000-square-foot, four-story facility (nearly five times its former size) planned for the site of a parking garage at the southwest corner of State and Kinzie Streets.

Renovation costs were pegged at $22 million. Ambitious, yes, but even in its old, modest digs, the MBC was a top-15 local tourist attraction with its collection of artifacts, tapes and reference materials.

Delays, disputes and misunderstandings related to funding halted construction in May, 2006, when the new building was only 60 percent finished, DuMont said. He figures the current shortfall at a little under $7 million -- not so much, really, for a proven civic attraction with naming rights still available for purchase.

With a little luck -- OK, a lot of luck -- private and public sources will come through with enough "distress relief" to get this project re-started before the opportunity for a world-class broadcasting museum in Chicago slips away.

In his landmark speech in Chicago, FDR - who was born 125 years ago Tuesday and will be posthumously inducted into the MBC's Radio Hall of Fame at July's gala -- called for "common sense and business sense" to come together to save the day.

Those words will hang heavily in the Auditorium Theater if the very museum that honors them is still facing the prospect of also fading into history.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu