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Old May 5th, 2007, 12:52 AM   #221
spyguy
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed

U. of. C. gets $35 million gift for art center

By Charles Storch

Tribune staff reporter
Published May 3, 2007, 11:17 PM CDT

A Chicago investment banker and his family are giving $35 million to the University of Chicago for a planned $100 million arts center that is to serve the campus and its South Side neighbors.

The gift by David and Reva Logan and their family is one of the larger single donations made to the U. of C. and is the biggest earmarked for the arts there, the university said Thursday.

University President Robert Zimmer said the donation "will enable us to proceed with the building in an expeditious way." He said the center, eyed for the south end of the campus, is expected to be a "transformative facility" for the school, widely known as a bastion for Nobel Prize-winning research in economics and science.

The Center for the Creative and Performing Arts is to be named for the octogenarian couple, who met while attending the U. of C.

David Logan received his undergraduate and law degrees there. Reva Logan delayed her education because of their marriage but later completed her degree at Roosevelt University and became a teacher.

David Logan is managing partner of Chicago-based Mercury Investments. He also is a stalwart advocate for the arts in Illinois and was on the Illinois Arts Council from 1976 to 2006. His wife's family also has been active in the arts: Her brother Allan Frumkin was a prominent gallery owner here and in New York. The couple collect photography and artists' illustrated books.

David Logan said he and his family approached the U. of C. about the donation. He said he was asked whether they would like to fund a theater or some other piece of the center. He replied that he wanted to do something far more ambitious.

He said he was making the gift for his wife, who is in declining health, and in memory of his mother. David Logan's mother wanted her son, who grew up in the Humboldt Park neighborhood and used to pal around with Saul Bellow, to go to the best school possible.

"I have been amazed at what I have been able to do in philanthropy and work," he said. "It's a great tribute to America."

In addition to the arts, the Logans have donated to education, religious, scientific, journalism and community causes here and around the country.

The arts center has been proposed for a site at 60th Street and Ingleside Avenue. It would be south of the Midway Plaisance and on the same block as the Midway Studios, where sculptor Lorado Taft once worked.

It is to include a multipurpose performance hall, three small theaters, music practice rooms and a recording studio and will serve students, faculty and Hyde Park residents.

Five prominent architectural teams are vying for the commission, and one is to be selected later this spring, Zimmer said. The center is expected to be completed in 2011.
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Old May 5th, 2007, 12:57 AM   #222
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http://www.suntimes.com/business/370...etry04.article

Poem's verses of fortune
REAL ESTATE | With Lilly backing, poetry group closes on prime home


May 4, 2007
BY DAVID ROEDER [email protected]

Hog Butcher for the World, Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat, Home to a Place where People who like Poetry can Meet.

Pardon the desecration of Carl Sandburg's lines, but it is inspired by a literary turn in the Chicago real estate market. Poetry has bought property, and will put up a building. The Muse is news.

Chicago's Poetry Foundation, which publishes the 95-year-old Poetry magazine, has closed on the purchase of the southwest corner of Dearborn and Superior for $6.7 million. The site includes two small buildings and a parking lot, which the foundation plans to replace with a "national home" for the art it celebrates.

"We certainly hope the building will reflect our vision, which is to give poetry a greater presence in our society," said foundation spokeswoman Anne Halsey.

It could also become a testament to Chicago's role in the national culture. Harriet Monroe founded Poetry magazine in 1912, giving a platform to writers before they became famous, and getting under the skin of Easterners who couldn't imagine anyone on the prairie thinking refined thoughts.

Banish the thought that rhyme and reason are missing in Chicago's construction boom.

Where did Poetry get the money? Alas, think drugs.

Ruth Lilly, in her 90s and an heiress to the Eli Lilly and Co. drug fortune, in 2002 began lavishing money on the foundation's forerunner. She never attached strings and, judging by ensuing litigation, seldom followed the rituals of estate planning.

The gift, paid as an annuity, has a present value of $175 million, Halsey said. It is intended to ensure Poetry can publish in perpetuity, and has helped the foundation launch conferences and readings locally and around the country.

It also caused an intellectual imbroglio among people who thought the windfall would change the foundation, and cause it to champion a populist style of composition that they detest. Others were upset that the foundation took the trustee of Lilly's estate to court, seeking damages when a loss in the value of Eli Lilly stock cut the size of the bequest.

Two courts in Indiana treated the foundation's complaint like it was doggerel, and handed down rejection slips. In March, the Indiana Supreme Court declined to issue its own review.

Halsey said the issue has been put aside, and that the foundation remains grateful for Lilly's support. The goal is to have the building open by 2010, she said.

U.S. Equities Realty, a firm well versed in the Chicago market, advised Poetry in the transaction. Halsey said the foundation is interviewing architectural firms, and hopes to pick one this summer.

The job is small but with epic aspirations. The foundation is mandating an ecologically friendly building that translates some of poetry's enduring spirit into glass and steel. Halsey said the project will include a garden, a reading room, and free access to the foundation's collections that are now in the Newberry Library. She compared it to New York's Poets House.

The property was acquired from owners affiliated with a law firm Serpico, Novelle & Petrosino, that has offices there.

So yes, it was poets negotiating a land deal with lawyers. There's enough material there for a poem of Wordsworthian scale, or maybe a grand opera.

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Old May 6th, 2007, 04:14 AM   #223
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^ I hope that building isn't exactly as tall as those nice buildings it will replace. What a damn shame that would be. Here's something of interest:

http://www.nearwestgazette.com/Archi...tybeat0507.htm
Pressure Point Recording Studio hopes to return city to musical glory

By Jennifer Nunez

It has been more than a few years since Chicago was the musical epicenter of the Midwest, but the people at Pressure Point Recording Studios at 2239 S. Michigan Ave. plan to bring back the days when the city had a prominent place in the music industry.

In the mid-20th century, most of Chicago’s record companies and distributors were located just south of the Loop on a 12-block stretch from 12th to 24th Streets, commonly known as Record Row. It was the center of the city’s flourishing popular music industry and comparable to Detroit’s Motown.

Before 2239 S. Michigan became part of musical history, the space was used as a speakeasy. Gangster Al Capone could be found there frequently in the early 1930s, said studio manager Chris Schneider.

Pressure Point opened in 1998 with one studio on the lower level, which is known today as Studio B. The studio has a small control room and recording booth used mainly for vocals and some single-instrument sessions.

In 2002 the studio began major renovations and built Studio A on the second floor. Acoustic consultants Kirkegaard Associates, architects Krueck & Sexton, and lighting consultants Schuler Shook aided the renovation effort. The team’s goal was to build a creative environment that could rival any place in the world to make a record, Schneider said.

The studio completed construction in 2004, and on June 17 Mayor Richard M. Daley came by for the ribbon cutting ceremony. Later that year, Mix magazine, an important music industry publication, recognized Pressure Point as Studio of the Year.

State of the art

Studio A houses a tracking room, live room, drum room, and midi room as well as two vocal booths and a large control room with a state-of-the-art console—a 72-channel SSL 9000 K. It was the third studio in the world to own one.

The design team exercised great care in providing isolation detailing that took the building’s floor-to-floor height into consideration. For example, a second window isolates the room acoustically from Michigan Avenue street noise without altering the historic facade.

The space also offers a wide range of acoustic conditions that can be altered easily. One room features an adjustable wall of hinged panels, allowing recording artists to choose a surface that is reflective, absorptive, diffusive, or a combination of the three. Also, curtains can be drawn over the rough mosaic wall to provide diffusion, reflection, or absorption.

The tracking room features natural lighting courtesy of second-floor skylights that employ a three-layer system designed to keep external sound out and maximize isolation on the third floor. On that third level, the studio built a small venue to host parties and musical showcases, which makes Pressure Point not just a studio but is a multi-use facility.

“We wanted to build not only a beautiful place but a place technologically superior that has all of the elements to enhance the creative process for our own artists as well as other artists who come here,” Schneider said.

A sanctuary

Designer Jason Fate incorporated Moroccan themes throughout the space, creating a sanctuary for artists to hone and express creativity. The live room, although functional, is furnished with a mosaic wall of the Tree of Life. Other features include a pillow-filled seating area and a multi-colored lighting system.

Artists such as Mariah Carey, Smokey Norful, Timberland, Rihanna, and Chicago’s own rock band Dearborn are just a few of the names that can be found on Pressure Point’s client roster.

Although Pressure Point has the newest technology available in the studio, it values old-fashioned equipment as well. Schneider favors old-school microphones like the E-Lamp 251, which was made in the 1960s.

Hit-maker Larry Sturm, who worked on Dearborn’s album The Old Way there recently, said the studio used two-inch analog tape to record Dearborn’s record. “I wish more people were doing analog,” he said. “It’s getting to the point now that most of the schools that train these new engineers don’t teach that anymore. They don’t even know how to set up a tape machine.”

Sturm’s work can be heard on Twista’s Kamikaze album, Michelle Williams’s new record, and Beyonce’s song Crazy in Love. He also has worked with Destiny’s Child, Mary J. Blige, Buddy Guy, and Disturbed.

Former Chicago Bears coach and football hall of famer Mike Ditka produced an album at Pressure Point last year for artist John Vincent. The album, entitled Eleven, includes ten remakes—nine of Frank Sinatra songs and one of Louis Armstrong’s. The eleventh track is The One, a country-blended song by Vincent.

Justin Timberlake recently visited the studio to lay down vocals for 50 Cent’s forthcoming album. Schneider added he was fortunate enough to work with one of his idols, Ray Davies from the Kinks, last summer. “In my mind, he is one of the greatest songwriters who ever lived,” Schneider said. “I was in awe, but I had to treat it like any other session.”

A lifelong calling

Schneider is not only the studio manager but an in-house producer for Pressure Point. He has been involved in music since age six, when he would grab chimes out of the music box in school before anyone else could. He said he liked them best because each made a distinctively different sound and he could create music with them.

Schneider has played in bands since he was 12 and was offered a record deal at 16. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a degree in music.
From the mid-1980s to the late 1990s, Schneider played guitar and sang vocals for the Euro-influenced pop and rock band The Ultra Violets. They toured the nation and became well known. They even had a Top 40 single in the United Kingdom, No One in Here, that played on MTV.

Pressure Point’s label is the home of Margo, its latest artist, who is bringing back classic R&B. Pressure Point is working on her website, which will be up soon.

“We never wanted to be just a recording studio,” Schneider said. “We also have a production company and our own label. We want to put Chicago back on the map as a music town.”

He believes “every musical road there has ever been in modern-day popular music, whether it’s gospel, jazz, rock, hip-hop, you name it, it has come to Chicago. They have either originated here or have been touched by the city in a way to make it a…unique thing, and it has impacted what we call American pop music.”
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Old May 6th, 2007, 06:48 PM   #224
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http://cms.colum.edu/newsandnotes/archives/005453.php

Jeanne Gang to Design Media Production Center
May 4, 2007


Columbia College Chicago President Dr. Warrick L. Carter and Allen M. Turner, chairman of the board of trustees, announced today the selection of Jeanne Gang & Studio Gang Architects to design Columbia’s Media Production Center (MPC), the first new construction project undertaken by the arts and media college.

Gang, whose Chicago-based firm is emerging as one of the most innovative practitioners in architecture today, was chosen from an initial field of 29 firms from across North American that were invited to submit qualifications for the project. In December, the field was narrowed to four finalist firms: Helfand Architecture of New York, Morphosis of Los Angeles, Brininstool + Lynch and Studio Gang, both of Chicago. Since that time, members of the selection team have been working with the architectural firms to determine the best fit.

“Jeanne Gang’s portfolio clearly demonstrates an understanding of each of the clients with which she has worked as well as a fresh and original approach to public architecture. However, our choice was about more than innovative design,” said Turner. “While we certainly want a building that makes a distinctive statement consistent with the image of Columbia as a cutting edge arts and media school, we were also determined to select a firm who we feel confident will bring the project in on budget, on schedule and who will work well with our in-house team of academics, administrators and creatives, while emphasizing environmental sustainability.”

“During the meetings with the finalists it became clear that Jeanne is very committed to this project and understands fully what it means to the college,” said Doreen Bartoni, dean of the School of Media Arts. “The level of research she conducted, not only on materials and program requirements, but on the history of Columbia as an educational and cultural institution and the history and current cultural currency of media arts, was truly impressive.”

Gang, who makes her own home in the South Loop not far from Columbia’s campus, is excited to be working on project that, she says “will look at the intersection of academics, media and architecture. From both a conceptual and a practical standpoint Studio Gang has an opportunity to create a building that not only meets the client’s functional needs but also expresses the importance of media arts in today’s society and the emergence of Columbia College as a major educational institution.”

A commitment to sustainable design was another important element in the search and selection. “To this point Columbia’s contribution to Chicago’s rich architectural heritage has been to rehabilitate and retrofit some of the South Loop’s most important historic buildings,” explained Carter. “In this way, we have served as stewards for Lakeside Press, now one of the college’s residence halls, and [William LeBaron] Jenney’s Ludington Building at 1104 S. Wabash. With the MPC as our first new construction, we intend to add to the City’s collection of significant buildings with a structure that is innovative in terms of the relationship between architecture and media but that also meets the commitments of an environmentally responsible institution. Jeanne Gang is eminently qualified to deliver on that goal.”

The Columbia Media Production Center will be an approximately 40,000-square-foot facility featuring two sound stages, a motion-capture studio and an animation lab and will further serve to enliven an area of the city that has enjoyed a recent boom in residential growth.

The MPC is proposed to be built at the southwest corner of 16th and State on a vacant lot currently owned by the City of Chicago. The land sale to Columbia, allowing for the construction of the facility, must be approved by the Community Development Commission and the City Council.

“I am very pleased that of all the firms we considered from across the country and Canada, Studio Gang, a Chicago-based firm was clearly the best for this project,” Turner added. “Over the years Columbia has become a major force in the educational and cultural landscape of the city and is recognized as an anchor institution in the booming South Loop. Working with a Chicago firm further demonstrates our commitment to the city and the talent we have here.”
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Old May 11th, 2007, 03:17 AM   #225
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http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.c...wntown_th.html

New downtown theaters looking more and more likely

At the opening of "The Color Purple," I talked to Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley. Now, this was a causal conversation rather than a formal interview, but, still, he knew with whom he was speaking.

"Mr. Mayor," I said. "The theaters downtown are all full. Are you thinking of building any more?"

"I got a lot of criticism for doing these theaters," said the mayor.

That's true. Five years or so ago, Daley took a lot of flack in the media for what looked like a lot of high-price, renovated theaters that were sitting dark. I wrote at least one such story myself. Crain's Chicago Business did another. Clearly, that still rankles. Clearly, Daley's decision to invest in the theater district now looks prescient. Then Daley continued.

"We're working on a couple more," he said. "Don't worry about it."

And that was it. He was gone. I scribbled it all down.

...

Broadway in Chicago is interested in doing shows at the Reskin (formerly the Blackstone Theatre) and has been talking to DePaul about various ways that could happen, and various ways the building could be renovated to improve audience amenities. A renovation study, I hear, already has been completed. Stay tuned on that score. This seems to me like a deal almost certain to happen in some form.
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Old May 12th, 2007, 07:25 AM   #226
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Haymarket monument makes a comeback
Targeted statue to reemerge after decades of police protection

By RYAN GALLAGHER
Medill News Service


The statue honoring the policemen killed in the Haymarket riots of 1886, presently in protective custody after repeated attempts to blow it up, will once again be put on public display.

Once located in downtown Chicago, the monument has been relocated more than five times. It is scheduled to publicly reemerge this month outside the new police headquarters at 3510 S. Michigan Ave. Since 1976, it has been inaccessible to the public in the courtyard of the police academy at 1300 W. Jackson on the Near West Side.

The statue, much like the era it symbolizes, has a volatile past.

It honors seven officers killed in the Haymarket Riot on May 4, 1886, a day in which worker protests ended in bloodshed during the peak of the American labor movement.

"[The riot was caused by] people not trusting other people, misunderstandings, suspicions and lack of tolerance," said Tim Samuelson, a Chicago historian.

The tragedy was set in motion on May 3, when police killed at least two strikers at a workers' rally. Tensions ran high the following day as a demonstration for workers' rights started peacefully but erupted into a chaotic riot between more than 170 police officers and the angry mob of protestors.

A bomb was thrown at the police, who responded with a hail of gunfire into the crowd of protesters, killing an undetermined number of citizens.

The statue, which shows a policeman bravely holding up his arm in the face of danger, has been a target of attack throughout its 118-year history.

"It's just a very contentious issue," said Peter Alter, a curator at the Chicago History Museum. "If you show the policemen, you're presenting a certain kind of interpretation. Policemen did die at that event, but so did workers and innocent bystanders."

Many consider the monument a deserved tribute to the men in blue, while others have criticized it for depicting only one side of the historic event. The statue has been either bombed or defaced on more than five separate occasions.

But after numerous repairs, the statue remains intact. It is a testament to the city's efforts to honor the officers killed, matched only by the opposition's attempts to destroy the commemoration of police on that tragic day.

"If you look objectively at Haymarket today, it was everybody's tragedy," Samuelson said. "People died on both sides."

Mark Donahue, president of the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police, says the statue is not just a memorial for fallen officers, but also a reminder of law enforcement's role in the labor movement.

"It's interesting that the same issues the labor movement was striving for in the 1880's is the same movement the police force has been driving for," Donahue said, mentioning the department's past efforts to gain employment rights for their officers.

A separate monument erected in 2004 commemorates the Haymarket Riot from the labor movement's perspective. A Haymarket martyrs' monument stands in Waldheim Cemetery, honoring the workers who claimed their innocence, but were executed in a trial following the riot. More than 100 years after the incident, the name Haymarket holds a meaningful place in history.

"The important part about Haymarket was it wasn't just about the city," Samuelson said. "Chicago became the escape valve that reflected the issues of labor management and capital that was going on throughout the country."
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Old May 16th, 2007, 12:54 AM   #227
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Nickerson Mansion and Co.

http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?sec...ge&id=5304519#


The Downtown Mansions
By Ron Magers


In the heart of the priciest real estate in downtown Chicago there is a row of historic mansions. They could have been lost to time or high-rise development but one man is on a personal mission to save them.

One of the buildings will one day be open to the public as a museum.

...

The mansion is now being filled with the Driehaus decorative arts collection and by fall it is expected to be open to the public as a monument to the arts and architecture.

---------

Great videos inside and out
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?sec...age&id=5304532
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Old May 16th, 2007, 01:19 AM   #228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy View Post
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?sec...ge&id=5304519#


The Downtown Mansions
By Ron Magers


In the heart of the priciest real estate in downtown Chicago there is a row of historic mansions. They could have been lost to time or high-rise development but one man is on a personal mission to save them.

One of the buildings will one day be open to the public as a museum.

...

The mansion is now being filled with the Driehaus decorative arts collection and by fall it is expected to be open to the public as a monument to the arts and architecture.

---------

Great videos inside and out
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?sec...age&id=5304532
Here's a preservation effort I can get behind 100%. Thanks for directing us to this site.
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Old May 16th, 2007, 03:12 AM   #229
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..

Last edited by Loopy; May 18th, 2010 at 07:22 PM.
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Old May 16th, 2007, 04:36 AM   #230
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Yikes that is unfortunate. I wonder what happened, why the design was changes (perhaps money, considering that the second rendering shows a smaller building).
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Old May 16th, 2007, 04:37 AM   #231
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Actually Loopy I just noticed on the second image it lists the locations "Loop Gold - Coast - Lincoln Park"; perhaps the two renderings are of two different locations??
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Old May 16th, 2007, 04:42 AM   #232
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hhmm...two very differant concepts indeed. Hopefully its the first one that gets the go ahead.

I am thinking the "Loop Gold - Coast - Lincoln Park" may be to signify which neigbhorhoods it is supposed to serve? I have a hard time thinking they would be building two centers at the same time. They do look like they are in two differant locations possiably though so who knows.
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Old May 17th, 2007, 12:54 AM   #233
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...slocalwest-hed

Museum revises plan for new site
Children's facility would be built in north Grant Park

By Noreen S. Ahmed-Ullah

Tribune staff reporter
Published May 16, 2007

The Chicago Children's Museum is revisiting plans for a new museum on the north end of Grant Park.

This time, the museum hopes to win the hearts of nearby residents, who fought an earlier proposal for the site, by occupying less park space and building farther underground, said Ald. Brendan Reilly (42nd) who has seen the museum's plans.

Museum officials would not discuss details of the new plan. They said they are working to finalize design concepts and will share them next month.

A rendering shows a staircase from Randolph Street going down to Daley Bicentennial Plaza, Reilly said. The staircase would separate two green roofs -- one for the museum and another for a new fieldhouse the museum still plans to build, he said.

The main entrance would still front Randolph, but there would be another entrance on the plaza, facing south into the park, according to sources. Buses would drop off visitors on lower Randolph.

Museum officials say pedestrians would be coming to the site from the parking garages or walking east from Millennium Park, Reilly said.

Reilly, who initially opposed plans for the site, says he's willing to give it another chance.

"It looks like they've reduced the size of the footprint," he said. "It remains to be seen if it will pass muster with the neighborhood."

He added that plans would need approval by neighborhood residents for his support.

Finding a home in Grant Park has been a tough road for the children's museum.

In 2005, the museum began looking to expand, having outgrown its current location at Navy Pier. The first plan called for replacing the Daley Bicentennial fieldhouse on Randolph with a new museum.

Much of the structure was to be built underground with a main entrance on the first floor of a foyer, fronting Randolph.

But residents living in high-rises just north of the site opposed the move, saying the area would be deluged with traffic.

The alderman at the time, Burton Natarus, had promised residents that he would oppose the Randolph plan when it came before the Chicago Plan Commission.

Then last fall, museum officials, the mayor and Natarus announced new plans for a children's museum at Monroe and Columbus Drives.

Almost immediately, civic groups like the Grant Park Conservancy and Friends of the Parks opposed the plans. Some said the plans went against the intentions of Montgomery Ward, a retail magnate who fought for the park and its views to the lake to remain open.

Natarus lost his seat in February.

Now some residents wonder if Reilly will have the power to block the Randolph plan.

They worry that the museum will flood the area with traffic, which is expected to increase as new residents move into nearby condominium buildings under construction.

"We have to start all over again," said Peggy Figiel, who led the fight against the museum's initial proposal on Randolph.

But for Bob O'Neill, president of the Grant Park Conservancy, who opposed the proposed Monroe location, the museum's latest efforts address the residents' concerns.

"I'm very happy it's going back to Randolph," he said. "I don't believe they could have gotten support of any downtown civic group on the Monroe site."
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Old May 27th, 2007, 06:05 PM   #234
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Grant Park Advisory Council and Grant Park Conservancy public meeting

Tuesday, May 29, 2007 - 6:30 p.m.

Daley Bicentennial Plaza - 337 E. Randolph just east of Columbus Drive.

Chicago Children's Museum

Please come out and give us your input on the newest plans for the museum.
Thank you very much for your interest and participation.

Please contact:
Bob O'Neill
Phone: 312-829-8015
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Old May 28th, 2007, 02:06 AM   #235
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Taken today:
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Old May 28th, 2007, 06:31 PM   #236
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More Children's Museum news

http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/4...hild28.article

A view of Children's Museum
GRANT PARK | Latest design wouldn't spoil lakefront look

May 28, 2007
BY ANDREW HERRMANN


Chicago residents can get a look Tuesday night at a new design for a proposed children's museum in Grant Park.

The Chicago Children's Museum, currently at Navy Pier, plans a move to Daley Bicentennial Plaza, just east of Millennium Park.

The latest design, by Mark Sexton of Krueck and Sexton Architects, has two stories aboveground but has a lower profile when viewed from the elevated Randolph Street. The design is apparently intended to address park traditionalists wary of scene-spoiling lakefront construction.

$40 million to build

When viewed from the below-street-level plaza, looking north, the museum has a glassy, curvaceous style about two stories high. The scheme moves the proposed site from the south of Bicentennial Plaza and incorporates a new, 20,000-square-foot field house.

Two stories of the proposed museum are underground, said Jim Law, the museum's vice president of planning.

The 100,000-square-foot museum will cost more than $40 million, Law said, and while officials seek private funds, Law did not rule out trying to tap public dollars.

Bob O'Neill, president of the Grant Park Advisory Board, which is hosting the community meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the existing Daley Plaza field house, said the project is appealing because it includes a new field house.

Because the new museum would replace an existing building, O'Neill said he thinks there will be less objection from preservationists.

However, high-rise neighbors have balked at increased congestion in the area caused by the museum, which draws an estimated 500,000 people annually to Navy Pier.

"Building in that environment takes incredible sensitivity," O'Neill said.

Last September, Mayor Daley expressed support for the nonprofit museum's move from Navy Pier at a news conference announcing a $15 million construction donation from Allstate Insurance.
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Old May 31st, 2007, 05:17 AM   #237
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$100 million gift to University of Chicago

By Jodi S. Cohen

Tribune higher education reporter
Published May 30, 2007, 7:12 PM CDT

A University of Chicago graduate has pledged $100 million, the largest gift ever to an Illinois university, to eliminate student loans for hundreds of undergraduates.

The cash gift, from an anonymous donor who graduated in the early 1980s, will provide full scholarships each year for about 800 students whose family incomes are less than $60,000. Another 400 of the college's 4,400 undergraduates, whose family incomes are less than $75,000, will have roughly half their loans replaced with grants.

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Old May 31st, 2007, 02:00 PM   #238
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i_am_hydrogen View Post
Taken today:
hydrogen, i don't see any of the foot bridge to Mil Pk in the construction area. Is that one still on (I assume it is; the city seemed pleased by the concept)? Also, isn't it supposed to line up with the western end of the new addition? and will the entire area on the north side of the AI have a new cover over the Metra tracks?
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Old May 31st, 2007, 03:55 PM   #239
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5/30/07 from the Lurie Garden

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Old May 31st, 2007, 11:17 PM   #240
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http://chicagorealestatedaily.com/cg...ws.pl?id=25188

Meeting on Children’s Museum gets heated
By Lorene Yue


The public unveiling of new designs for a new Chicago Children’s Museum proposed for Grant Park turned a community meeting into a near-shouting match, as residents sounded off about the controversial project.

The Daley Bicentennial Field House at 337 E. Randolph St. was packed to capacity as the Grant Park Conservancy showed updated renderings for the proposed 100,000-square-foot museum and fielded questions from a sometimes hostile audience, said Bob O’Neill, president of the Grant Park Conservancy.

“It was probably our most challenging meeting to date,” Mr. O’Neill said. “There has been a lot of misinformation and a lot of e-mails traveling around.”

The Chicago Children’s Museum has met with steady neighborhood opposition since it proposed in 2005 moving to a site in the park along Randolph Street from its current location at Navy Pier. The new facility would be located in Daley Bicentennial Plaza, just east of Millennium Park.

Mr. O’Neill said much of the opposition voiced at the packed meeting Tuesday night came from area residents concerned about increased pedestrian and vehicle traffic overwhelming the north end of Grant Park. He says those concerns are unfounded, saying Randolph Street is not swamped with cars because it does not feed into Lake Shore Drive and all buses and cars would access the Chicago Children’s Museum on Randolph Street’s mid-level.

Randolph Street’s three tiers is one reason the Grant Park Conservancy pushed for the museum’s relocation to be switched from the original plan at the northeast corner of Monroe Street and Columbus Drive, Mr. O’Neill said.

“There are groups of people who don’t want change,” he said. “But change is coming.”

Concerns about increased traffic should be alleviated when the museum conducts its public meetings in June, said Jim Law, the museum's vice-president of planning and external affairs and former executive director of the Mayor’s Office of Special Events.

Attendees at the Grant Park Conservancy gathering were shown renderings that depicted a lower roofline but broader profile for the proposed museum at 337 E. Randolph St. The design still calls for a two-story facility that would include a new field house to replace the dated Daley Bicentennial Field House, but now there is a publicly accessible plaza on the grounds, Mr. O’Neill said.

Mehta Brown, who lives across from the proposed Randolph Street location, is among the residents who firmly oppose any structural additions to Grant Park. She and other neighbors frown at the idea of a two-story atrium rising up across the street from their homes.

"I don't want anything to be built," said. Ms. Brown, who runs the Save Daley Bi blog. "This location is treasured and valued as is."

Eric Frost, who runs the community Web site New-Eastside.com, said the area around the proposed museum location is becoming too overdeveloped for his taste.

"We don't want to attract more (development)," he said. "It's just going to get busier."


Mark Sexton, a principal at Krueck & Sexton Architects, declined to comment on his firm’s recent tweaks to the Chicago Children’s Museum. Chicago-based Krueck & Sexton is the architect for the Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies and has worked on Millennium Park’s Crown Fountain.

Aided by a $15-million grant from Allstate Insurance Co. and a land donation from Chicago’s Park District, the new Chicago Children’s Museum will be nearly double the 57,000 square feet it currently occupies at Navy Pier.
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