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Old June 8th, 2008, 03:14 PM   #501
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Looks like U of C is joining with U of I to make Illinois the buried library capital of the world!
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Old June 9th, 2008, 08:11 PM   #502
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...,6443523.story

U. of C. OKs hospital pavilion plan
Flexible design uses modular cubes that can be reconfigured

By Bruce Japsen
June 9, 2008


The University of Chicago Medical Center, preparing to embark on a $700 million expansion, has settled on a final design for a new hospital pavilion that will use a modular design executives say allows for flexibility should future renovations be needed.

The 10-story, 1.2 million-square-foot hospital pavilion will span a two-block area on East 57th Street, just north of the Comer Children's Hospital and the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine in the Hyde Park neighborhood on the city's South Side.


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Old June 10th, 2008, 04:06 AM   #503
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^ Interesting.

Does anybody know what this hospital is replacing? Some old 3 flats, right?
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Old June 10th, 2008, 06:35 AM   #504
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
^ Interesting.

Does anybody know what this hospital is replacing? Some old 3 flats, right?


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Old June 10th, 2008, 04:27 PM   #505
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^ Ahh, mostly vacant lots & parking. Nice trade
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Old June 11th, 2008, 04:13 AM   #506
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Public Housing Museum
1322-24 West Taylor Street



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Old June 11th, 2008, 06:08 PM   #507
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http://news.uchicago.edu/news.php?asset_id=1390

University of Chicago selects HOK as architect for new science tower
June 10, 2008


The University Board of Trustees has approved HOK as architect for the proposed Center for Physical and Computational Sciences. HOK, a firm with 26 regional offices worldwide, including one in Chicago, has completed several major science and technology projects in recent years.

The estimated $375 million center will encompass half a million square feet of new and renovated space on the west side of Ellis Avenue between 56th and 57th streets. The scientists who will move into the center currently work in multiple buildings that are either poorly connected or scattered across campus.

..."Construction is scheduled to begin in fall 2010, with completion in spring 2013.

...The Research Institutes building, slated for thorough renovation, represents a proud scientific tradition that dates back to Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi, Fefferman said. Fermi worked in the Research Institutes after he oversaw construction of the first nuclear reactor across the street during World War II.

...HOK's challenge will be to design an interior that meets the needs of the scientists, while presenting an engaging exterior. The project will entail razing the Accelerator Building, the High Energy Physics Building, the Astronomy and Astrophysics Center and the Low Temperature Laboratory.
The demolition will make way both for the new building and for new green space between the higher-density medical buildings to the west and the lower-density core of the campus to the east. "By virtue of its location, it will help define a new quadrangle that will bring together all of the sciences," Wiesenthal said.

The new center, standing eight stories high, will be important for other reasons as well. It will be a highly visible structure to visitors entering campus from the north, and it will sit across the street from the proposed Joe and Rika Mansueto Library, designed by architect Helmut Jahn.
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Old June 11th, 2008, 08:34 PM   #508
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy View Post
Public Housing Museum
1322-24 West Taylor Street
One can only ponder the exhibit possibilities...
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Old June 12th, 2008, 01:32 PM   #509
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Between this new science complex, the new arts complex (which I love), and the hospital, UC is in for billions of dollars in new construction in the next 5 years.
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Old June 16th, 2008, 05:32 PM   #510
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Inside the Art Institute's new Modern Wing with the building's architect, Renzo Piano
An exclusive look inside the Art Institute's new wing with the building's architect, Renzo Piano


By Blair Kamin Tribune critic
June 15, 2008

Here's a prediction about the Art Institute of Chicago's modern and contemporary art wing that opens next May: The third-floor galleries, which overlook Millennium Park, will be hailed by critics and the public as some of the most beautiful rooms in Chicago.

For now, the galleries house blue foam mock-ups of "The White Negress" and other Constantin Brancusi sculptures in the museum's renowned collection. Looking through thin, tall windows, the visitor is rewarded with deftly framed views of the silvery petals of Frank Gehry's Pritzker Pavilion, swaths of green and purple in the Lurie Garden, along with the white-striped Aon Center and other skyscrapers.

"This could only be in Chicago," said the building's Pritzker Prize-winning Italian architect, Renzo Piano, during a recent tour, as if to counter detractors who claim that his ubiquitous museums verge on the formulaic.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/featur...,2142268.story
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Old July 21st, 2008, 09:21 PM   #511
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Highly anticipated Modern Wing of the Art Institute of Chicago by Renzo Piano to open to the public next May

July 17, 2008

The Art Institute of Chicago is pleased to announce that the Modern Wing, designed by Renzo Piano, will open to the public on Saturday, May 16, 2009. The Nichols Bridgeway, a pedestrian bridge designed by Renzo Piano that connects the Modern Wing to Millennium Park, will open the same day. In celebration of the opening of the largest addition in the Art Institute's history, admission to the entire museum will be free through Friday, May 22, 2009. Opening Day will be preceded by a week of special activities for school children, staff, members, and donors.

"The opening of the Modern Wing is an historic moment for the Art Institute of Chicago--the culmination of a decade of work and dedication by everyone at the museum," said Tom Pritzker, Chairman of the Board of Trustees. "It also represents an historic moment for the city. The building will showcase as never before the breadth and depth of the Art Institute's collections of modern and contemporary art, which have not previously been seen to their fullest advantage due to limited gallery space in the existing museum buildings. The Modern Wing signals to the world the cultural calibre of the city of Chicago and reaffirms its place as a leading cultural destination."

http://www.canadianarchitect.com/iss...issue=07172008
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Old September 9th, 2008, 05:19 AM   #512
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Art Institute 7 Sept

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Old September 13th, 2008, 06:16 AM   #513
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Ferris wheel

Quote:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...,6418099.story

Giant Ferris wheel for Navy Pier?
By Kathy Bergen | Tribune staff reporter
8:29 PM CDT, September 12, 2008

Gargantuan Ferris wheels are the new status symbol for big cities vying to grab more attention on the world stage, so Chicago is going for an upgrade at Navy Pier, planning to build one at least twice the size of the existing wheel there.

A new, privately developed Ferris wheel, Navy Pier officials hope, would rise at least 300 feet into the air and attract the sorts of tourist hordes who plunk down big bucks to ride other monster wheels worldwide, including the enormous London Eye on the bank of the Thames.

Other cities such as Singapore and Beijing either have huge Ferris wheels or are planning them, and even Baghdad is dreaming of a giant wheel in the sky.

For Chicago, the Ferris wheel not only would be an extraordinary addition to the skyline, but a highly symbolic endeavor as well, because the attraction was invented in the early 1890s to be the star of the world's fair here.

.........The authority, also known as McPier, on Monday will advertise for companies "to design, build, own and operate" a giant wheel, according to the bid document. "The design of the new wheel must be worthy to inherit the traditions of the original Ferris wheel built by George Washington Ferris."

"We're basically looking for the wheel to be self-financed, so taxpayer money will not be involved," Tetzlaff said. The idea is for the developer to construct the wheel, and to share a portion of its revenue with the pier. Officials declined to speculate on the cost of such a project.

Bidders also are asked to "use their ingenuity" as to where the wheel should be located on the pier.

.......Chicago is not going for "tallest" title, but rather is seeking innovative design, said Tetzlaff, adding he hopes the winning bidder would work with local architects and engineers.............
..
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Old September 13th, 2008, 11:02 PM   #514
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That would be pretty cool, I would first have to see the designs but it sounds intriguing. Another thing that would be cool, and I don't know if it would be possible or even worth it but what if they made it into a giant "green" Ferris wheel, with solar power or wind powering it up.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old September 21st, 2008, 04:30 PM   #515
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posted this in the Bucktown thread as well but its one of those hybrid probjects.....

Quote:
http://www.suntimes.com/news/transpo...park20.article

Full steam ahead on park
BLOOMINGDALE TRAIL |
City seeks designs to turn old rail route into a bike-and-people-friendly green space

September 20, 2008

BY MARY WISNIEWSKI Transportation Reporter [email protected]
The old railroad right-of-way that runs east and west along Bloomingdale Avenue on the Northwest Side could become a "linear park" for bicyclists and pedestrians once the city puts together the design and the funding.

The city plans to seek proposals from engineers and architects by the end of the year to examine building a 2.7-mile "Bloomingdale Trail" along unused Canadian Pacific tracks from Ridgeway on the west to the Chicago River on the east.

Andrew Vesselinovitch, director of the urban parks program for the Trust for Public Land, said the Bloomingdale Trail would provide a crucial east-west link for bicyclists and pedestrians. Many of the city's bike paths run north and south.

The preliminary plans include new parks along the trail, including one in a weedy, unused concrete parking lot at Milwaukee and Bloomingdale. Other parks are planned at Albany, Damen, Marshfield and Kimball.

Eight access points would allow visitors to get on and off the elevated trail, which would pass through the neighborhoods of Logan Square and Bucktown.......
More in link
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Old October 5th, 2008, 09:09 PM   #516
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Nation's first, only public housing museum coming to Taylor Street

By Sheila Elliott

The kaleidoscopic image of American public housing will enter a new era as an important part of national history with the advancement of plans for a National Public Housing Museum, which will be located on the Near West Side.

In 2006, the Chicago Housing Authority’s (CHA’s) Central Advisory Council, the residents’ leadership group, gave the plan its support. On Aug. 13, CHA commissioners agreed to allow museum advocates to renovate a vacant, 70-year-old, three-story housing unit—a fragment of the once sizeable ABLA (Abbott-Brooks-Loomis-Addams) Homes—and turn it into a facility to document, explore, and interpret public housing’s role American life.



The CHA agreed to turn over the property in 2011 if the museum organizers meet specific criteria, said CHA spokesperson Matthew Aguilar. They must raise $3.2 million by May 2009, another $1.5 million by December 2010, and the rest by December 2011.

“It’s more than a museum,” said Sunny Fischer, executive director of the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, the proposed museum’s primary backer. There is “tremendous opportunity for interpretation” and to explain this aspect of the American experience, she said.

Rather than a deterrent to creating the museum, presenting the complexities arising from the American public housing experience is the rationale for creating the museum in the first place. Public housing is "a part of the American way of life that may need better explanation and understanding," she said.

Fischer is herself a product of New York City’s public housing projects.

With the site secured, the foundation can move ahead with other tasks in the development process, including fundraising. Fisher said a $17 million campaign is underway; museum organizers envision a phased opening starting in 2012.

U.S. Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) and Congressman Danny K. Davis (D-7th) hope to obtain $5 million in federal funding.

Local, State, Federal input

Architects have completed renderings for the museum, and organizers have created a 15- member board of directors, advisory and steering committees, and a project team. In the process, the group is tapping the talents of individuals from the business community, the arts, the Chicago and New York museum communities, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, the State government, the media, universities, religious organizations, social service agencies, and residents and former residents of CHA housing. Deverra Beverly, longtime ABLA tenants' leader, is the founding chair of the museum.

"I am elated because a lot had thought that we couldn't have this museum," Beverly said. "It will keep the good memories alive."

The National Public Housing Museum will be located at 1322-24 W. Taylor St. at Ada Street, with the hulking, three-story remnant of the ABLA Homes as its nucleus. While workers will renovate and restore the former housing project, those changes will not alter the museum’s goal of presenting life as it was lived in the projects throughout the building's long career with the CHA, said Fischer. Officials plan interpretive and educational facilities along with limited retail and perhaps dining options; they also may include space for academic research.

Today, the site makes a powerful visual statement about the Taylor Street community’s changes over the last decade. Construction crews and homeowners go about their day-to-day lives in the new Roosevelt Square residential area to the east. When completed, the museum will join the area's new housing and thriving businesses.

These contrasting images represent the most recent incarnations of a neighborhood that offers a mother lode of Chicago history. Fischer said that, decades ago, social reformer Jane Addams spoke about the area’s need for public housing; when the first units in the project opened in 1938, they bore her name. The project’s association with famous names continued when the builders called on Chicago’s renowned landscape artist, Jens Jensen, to design lawns and parkways and tapped Edgar Miller to create the “Animal Court,” a charming arrangement of animal sculptures that beckoned children living there to play.

Born in the New Deal

The ABLA Homes were born in the spirit of Depression-era President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, with its belief that providing a temporary housing solution for people when their lives were in crisis was far better than permitting them to be homeless. Pictures from the CHA archives from the project’s earliest years, which are included in Fischer’s research, provide glimpses into the lives of residents and reveal an orderly world of pleasant surroundings where smiling children play in a secure environment.

Profound changes in America were afoot, however. As the 1930s and 1940s passed, Chicago began to face significant the demographic shifts, with thousands of people moving from rural areas to the city. The city’s manufacturing base boomed and then began a painful era of contraction. Unemployment, expensive upkeep and funding problems for housing projects, education woes, and racial division all played a part in the post-World War II era, each leaving its imprint on the public housing experience.

By the time the final decades of the 20th century approached, many people viewed public housing as a world permeated by drugs, gangs, violence, and personal frustrations. To others, such as residents and local businesses who relied on residents as their customer base, the housing projects were a vital part of the community.

Far from avoiding negative stereotypes, Fischer sees the museum as an opportunity to meet difficult topics head on, explain them, and invite public discussion. Reconstructed housing units, memorabilia, displays, and personal recollections will provide explanations and insights; museum backers hope they will serve as a forum where challenging truths can be discussed and better understood.

For some people, Fischer admitted, simply the idea of opening a National Public Housing Museum elicits a negative reaction. “That’s exactly why we need the museum," she said. “Housing issues have not gone away." Neither have many of the other social questions that formed part of the public housing experience: single-parent households, unemployment, and poor quality of education, Fischer added.

Balanced picture

"Presenting a balanced picture of these complicated realties is important," Fischer explained, noting that means presenting the happy times but not ignoring the more painful memories, too. For residents, regardless of which public housing development they lived in, the small units, stairwells, balconies, and yards "were ‘home’ and for many still evoke feelings of affection," she said.

The National Public Housing Museum will be a “museum of conscience,” she continued, not unlike the Lower East Side Tenement Museum in New York City, which shows a rough but important part of the American experience.

For more information, contact the Driehaus Foundation at (312) 641-5772. The National Public Housing Museum website is www.publichousingmuseum.org.
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Old November 7th, 2008, 01:12 AM   #517
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...,1746880.story

U of C graduate business school to be renamed after $300M gift

By Greg Burns
5:00 PM CST, November 6, 2008


A financier who made a fortune in the investment business using ideas developed at the University of Chicago has donated $300 million to the graduate business school, which is being renamed in his honor.

It is the largest gift ever to the university, and the largest to any business program in the world.

The donor is 61-year-old David G. Booth, founder and chief executive of Dimensional Fund Advisors, as well as his wife Suzanne and their two children. The school will be called the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, or "Chicago Booth" for short.
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Old November 7th, 2008, 08:04 AM   #518
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^ Holy **** that is truly amazing!!!
Obama/politics, Pres. administration filled with Chicago-related/based politicians, unending exposure as warm-up for Olympic hopes and now this..not a day is going by this week where there isn't some great news for Chicago!

Wow!
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Old November 8th, 2008, 09:32 AM   #519
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While I don't really like the name change as the current name carries with it a lot of cachet, "Booth School of Business" is at least more distinct.
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Old November 10th, 2008, 02:57 AM   #520
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About 2 years ago, I heard that the Harris Theater in Millennium Park was considering installing a marquee to improve exposure.

Did this ever happen? Is it still planned? Thanks in advance
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