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Old November 30th, 2005, 03:05 AM   #41
The Urban Politician
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Originally Posted by ChicagoLover
I cannot believe this. Space better used for retail???? Since Taylor homes were torn down, that area is basically 70% vacant lots. Am I wrong? Forgive me, but Dorothy Tillman sounds like a complete idiot. Something about looking a gift horse in the mouth.
^Dorothy Tillman is the dumbest bitch of all. I can't stand her bullshit--she still lives in the 1960's.

As far as I'm concerned, she is a greedy, useless, selfish hag. She wants to keep her ward as dirt poor as possible because she knows that those are the people who will keep voting for her. She has never shown any interest in improving her ward despite plenty of opportunities, mostly because the moment more people move in they will vote her out.

Selfish and stupid, yet disguised as the great savior of poor blacks. Bullshit--she needs to leave
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Old November 30th, 2005, 04:26 AM   #42
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I know Daley usually delegates decisions about development to the aldermen in which the proposed development may occur. But aren't there cases where Daley uses some political capital to override the alderman's decision? Isn't this a case where Daley should make some waves? I mean, this is f-ing ridiculous. If Tillman wasn't a politician looking out for her own ass and no own else's, I would think she should be committed for opposing this project!

I really liked the fact that this was going up on State Street, because I wanted to keep the momentum of revitalization going all the way down this street. I was hoping that all the new developments -- the recently built police HQ, the new modernist apartments, the IIT State Street Village developments, and now this -- a real non-ghetto streetscape would start to develop, motivating further private development, and, I envisioned, a big Tribune trend piece charting it all say 10 years from now..
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Old November 30th, 2005, 04:48 AM   #43
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Good golly! That Dorothy Tillman is metally retarded! She is keeping her constituents stay poor and downtrodden. I don't think she has a serious conviction of serving her ward well. It seems that collecting hats is her best contribution she gives, for an alderman.
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Old December 2nd, 2005, 02:43 PM   #44
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http://www.globest.com/news/425_425/.../140701-1.html
$200M Art Institute Expansion Grows By 34,000 SF
By Mark Ruda
Last updated: December 1, 2005 02:39pm

CHICAGO-The Art Institute of Chicago’s $200-million expansion is growing by another 34,000 sf. The third-floor addition to the art museum at 111 S. Michigan Ave. also will be 10 feet higher than originally planned.

Revisions to the Art Institute’s expansion plan, originally approved in 2004, were recently endorsed by the city’s plan commission. The third floor, visible from Michigan Avenue, will add a restaurant and sculpture garden overlooking Millennium Park to the north. The third floor will be accessible, with no charge, by an escalator from the Monroe Street side of the building, now 693,000 sf. The addition, designed by architect Renzo Piano, will add nearly 300,000 sf to the building.

The addition is expected to be completed in 2009. Art Institute officials say expansion is needed to hold the more than 270,000 objects in its collection.

The Art Institute of Chicago has embarked on a fund-raising campaign to raise money for the addition, as well as upgrading the heating, air conditioning and ventilation system in the entire building. In addition to $200 million in construction, the Art Institute hopes to collect another $87 million to support operations in the new portion of the building.

The project includes demolishing the current Goodman Theater and replacing it with a glass, steel and limestone structure topped with a “flying carpet,” a luminous sun screen that will appear to float in air. The expansion plans continue to get support from the Friends of the Park, Loop Alliance and Grant Park Conservancy, according to the Department of Planning and Development.
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Old December 2nd, 2005, 07:33 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoLover
I know Daley usually delegates decisions about development to the aldermen in which the proposed development may occur. But aren't there cases where Daley uses some political capital to override the alderman's decision? Isn't this a case where Daley should make some waves? I mean, this is f-ing ridiculous. If Tillman wasn't a politician looking out for her own ass and no own else's, I would think she should be committed for opposing this project!

I really liked the fact that this was going up on State Street, because I wanted to keep the momentum of revitalization going all the way down this street. I was hoping that all the new developments -- the recently built police HQ, the new modernist apartments, the IIT State Street Village developments, and now this -- a real non-ghetto streetscape would start to develop, motivating further private development, and, I envisioned, a big Tribune trend piece charting it all say 10 years from now..
The funny part of it is that that ward votes her in to be a thorne in Daley's ass....all the while they are screwing themselves....years and years of neglect just to piss off Daley. Talk about shooting ones collective self in the foot!
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Old December 2nd, 2005, 11:24 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago3rd
The funny part of it is that that ward votes her in to be a thorne in Daley's ass....all the while they are screwing themselves....years and years of neglect just to piss off Daley. Talk about shooting ones collective self in the foot!
^Correct me if I"m wrong, but hasn't she been an Alderman for like 30 years, long before Daley was ever elected?
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Old December 3rd, 2005, 12:45 AM   #47
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http://www.bizjournals.com/sanantoni...tml?from_rss=1

Clear Channel chips in $100,000 toward new broadcast museum in Chicago

Clear Channel Communications Inc. donated $100,000 toward the completion of the new Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago.

San Antonio-based Clear Channel made the contribution to help pay for construction of the Radio Hall of Fame exhibition area. The entire museum will consist of 70,000 square feet of space and will open in late summer 2006.

Clear Channel owns 1,200 radio station properties, making it the single largest radio station operator in the United States.

"Clear Channel is committed to honoring the people who make radio great, so it is thrilling that our company will have a role in opening the doors of the Radio Hall of Fame's new state-of-the-art home," Clear Channel CEO Mark Mays says.

"The new MBC will showcase respected radio talent in a more interactive and entertaining environment, creating a fitting tribute to the pioneers who shaped the medium," he adds.

The Museum of Broadcast Communications is one of three broadcast museums in the United States. It will feature a new interactive exhibit gallery, a media cafe, working radio and television studios and a gift shop.
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Old December 4th, 2005, 08:22 AM   #48
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I think one of the most interesting proposals is the plan for the Chicago Art Foundation museum. After going through their web site, I wasn't sure if (in their eventual 2009 plan) they were going to try to construct a site of 50k sq feet near millennium park, or if they were going to find an existing space. Anyone know the answer to that one?
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Old December 7th, 2005, 09:24 PM   #49
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chalk anouther one up for these guys----------

CHICAGO, Dec. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- The Museum of Broadcast Communications
(MBC) is announcing it has received a $50,000 grant from the Siragusa
Foundation in support of the Museum's capital campaign. The gift will be used
for exhibit development and for the expansion of the new media museum in
downtown Chicago.
With the grant from the Siragusa Foundation, the MBC will develop
"Inventors & Inventions" -- an exhibit that will showcase the technical
contributions to the development of radio and television by introducing the
inventors, inventions, and early manufacturers that shaped mass communications
in America.
"The support of the Siragusa Foundation in the development of 'Inventors
& Inventions' is fitting given the significant role Ross D. Siragusa played in
the evolution of consumer electronics in America," said MBC President Bruce
DuMont. "Ross Siragusa was a product development genius who led a major
effort to produce affordable television sets after World War II and he led
Admiral to the forefront of pioneering television manufacturers," DuMont
added.
Ross D. Siragusa founded the Admiral Corp. in Chicago in 1934 and
transformed it from a small radio and phonograph company into one of the
leading makers of televisions. By the 1950s, Admiral was a major TV brand and
one of the first to produce color sets. Admiral was also a major sponsor of
groundbreaking television programs like Sid Caesar's Admiral Broadway Review
(NBC) and Bishop Fulton Sheen's Life is Worth Living (DuMont).
In making the grant announcement, Irene Phelps, President of the Siragusa
Foundation, said, "We are excited to be a part of The Museum of Broadcast
Communications' educational efforts and recognize that the new MBC will
provide opportunities for young people to learn about the important role that
technology played in American broadcasting. And, this is a great way to honor
my grandfather."
Located near the new museum's ticketing area, the "Inventors & Inventions"
exhibit will feature a timeline and display vintage pop culture artifacts,
classic radios and televisions, period advertising and images of notables in
the field. A montage of audio and video clips will play on continuous loops on
the period pieces, progressing from early crystal radios to I-Pods and
plasmas.
The Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC) is one of three broadcast
museums in the United States. Currently, it is building a new 70,000-square-
foot home at State and Kinzie streets in downtown Chicago. The new MBC will
open in the late summer of 2006. Visit http://www.Museum.TV for more
information.
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Old December 8th, 2005, 12:33 AM   #50
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^ Wow, the MBC is getting a lot of donations lately, albeit relatively small ones. What they really need is a good 1 million dollar slam-dunk from Motorola or Boeing, etc
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Old December 11th, 2005, 08:00 PM   #51
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Not to sound like a broken record, but...

http://www.nearwestgazette.com/1205-Greektown.htm

Ground broken for museum in Greektown

By Christine Mangan


(12/5/05) - Despite the rain and cold, dozens of people gathered in Greektown on October 24 to watch the demolition of the old Turek Hardware Store at 333 S. Halsted St. in order to make room for the future Hellenic Museum and Cultural Center.
“The weather may not be cooperating with us today, but a rainbow has just come out, and that is a very good omen for this project,” Endy Zemenides, a museum board member, said in his opening remarks.
Both Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley and Athens Mayor Dora Bakoyannis were on hand at the demolition, along with Andrew A. Athens, national chairman of the United Hellenic American Congress and president of the World Council of Hellenes, and 27th Ward Alderman Walter Burnett Jr., all lending their support to creation of the new museum.
“Mayor Bakoyannis and I share a similar vision for our cities,” Daley said. “We constantly strive to make our cities a better place to live, learn, work, and raise a family. It’s the family values and work ethic of the Greek-Americans in Chicago that make this new Hellenic Museum and Cultural Center so important to our community. This museum will provide a sense of pride for all Chicagoans for generations to come.”
Bakoyannis echoed Daley’s sentiment. Concerning the museum’s creation, she said “It was an odyssey and like Homer’s Odyssey, this journey has a happy end. This moment of inauguration is a group effort and required the support of Mayor Daley, the City of Chicago, the Greek community of Chicago, and many Greek-American organizations, both local and national.”
President of the Hellenic Museum John Marks said, “Today is a day that will go down in history. With this museum, we will have the greatest tribute to our heritage anywhere in the United States.”
A museum that currently houses a permanent collection of more than 6,000 objects, including artifacts relating to both Greek and Greek-American life, the Hellenic Museum has found temporary housing at 801 W. Adams St. on the fourth floor of the building that houses Greek Islands.
Founded in 1983, the Hellenic Museum opened its doors to the public in 1992. Ever since, the museum’s founders and board of directors have eagerly anticipated the day the museum would be a freestanding institution.
A national museum and the only one of its kind in the United States, it has had to move twice in the past before coming to its final “temporary” home. Very soon, it will be housed in its new and permanent 40,000 square foot home in the heart of Greektown, at the corner of Van Buren and Halsted Streets.
In 2000, under the Near West Side Area Land Use Plan, the Hellenic Museum was designated as the gateway to both Greektown and the Near West Side. Two years later, a redevelopment agreement that provided a $3.5 million Tax Increment Financing (TIF) subsidy was agreed upon for the Hellenic Museum. The new building’s design, inspired by the Stoa of Attalos in Athens, will be completed by the Chicago firm Pappageorge/ Haymes, which won a nationwide competition for the honor.
Once completed, the new museum will feature amenities including a library and technology center, an auditorium, a children’s center, classrooms, a gift store, and a major cultural center. It also will house multiple galleries for permanent and rotating exhibitions. The end result will help fulfill the Hellenic Museum and Cultural Center’s mission “to be the nation’s foremost center of Hellenic history, culture, and arts, where the public can explore the Greek immigrant experience in America and examine the influence of Hellenic culture and people from antiquity to present.”
As the wrecking ball broke through the building, cheers rang out in anticipation of what was next to come. Though a representative for the Hellenic Museum was unsure when construction would begin, completion of the new institution is scheduled for 2008.
The Hellenic Museum and Cultural Center remains open at its temporary location; regular exhibitions are free to members, with $5 admission for non-members. For more information, call (312)655-1234 or visit www.hellenicmuseum.org.



Youngsters in traditional Greek garb were part of the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Hellenic Museum and Cultural Center.



The new Hellenic Museum and Cultural Center will be part of the gateway to Greektown.
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Old December 11th, 2005, 09:41 PM   #52
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^ Looks very cool. They should build more greek style buildings in this area.
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Old December 16th, 2005, 12:15 AM   #53
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http://chicagojournal.com/main.asp?S...40&TM=60362.11

Children’s museum eyes Daley Bi
Project could include rehab of forlorn fieldhouse

By HAYDN BUSH, Managing Editor


Hidden by a sloping green roof and located in a lightly traveled section of Grant Park, the Daley Bicentennial Plaza field house attracts the attention of few passers-by beyond those who come for its signature outdoor skating rink or the pedestrians who cross Frank Gehry’s winding bridge and briefly touch down in Daley Bi before returning to Millennium Park. A few blocks away at Navy Pier, the Chicago Children’s Museum sees considerably more foot traffic, with hundreds of thousands of youthful visitors passing through its doors each year. But Bob O’Neill, president of the Grant Park Advisory Council, says officials with the children’s museum, in the search for more space, are considering a move to the parking garages adjacent to the Daley Bicentennial Plaza, which would conceivably include a major renovation and reworking of the park’s facilities.

"[The Chicago Children’s Museum] wants a central location," O’Neill said. "They may or may not do it. Who knows?"

Chicago Children’s Museum officials were unavailable for comment Tuesday, but at a Grant Park Advisory Council meeting Tuesday, O’Neill said he has met with Gigi Pritzker Pucker, board chair for the Chicago Children’s Museum, who O’Neill says is tentatively interested in the possibility of moving the museum to Grant Park. The museum is also mulling a proposal for a 20,000-square-foot expansion that would allow it to stay on Navy Pier.

"I think we need to explore it to find out whether or not it’s a good idea," O’Neill said.

At this point, O’Neill said, it’s far too early to know whether the museum will relocate from Navy Pier to Daley Bicentennial Plaza, adding that the Park District is just beginning to broach the matter. O’Neill stressed that the spartan Daley Bi field house could be in line for a major renovation if the museum were to relocate to the surrounding area, and stressed that the Park District was unlikely to close the field house permanently. Other bonuses, O’Neill pointed out, would include an influx of younger visitors to Grant Park, who would conceivably enliven the staid, modernist surroundings of Daley Bi.

O’Neill said he has tried for several years to find a way to get Daley Bicentennial renovated, and is intrigued by the prospect of the Chicago Children’s Museum becoming the 10th city museum to reside in a city park, joining the Art Institute, the Museum Campus and the Museum of Contemporary Art among others.

"They would get the synergy of being on Park District property," O’Neill said.

Some logistical problems remain, though. The building, per city regulations, could be no taller than the 98-foot height of the School of the Art Institute’s Allerton Building on the west end of Grant Park. In addition, designers of a new children’s museum would have to find a way to use the northern Grant Park parking garage space, O’Neill said.

"The biggest challenge with the design will be integrating the children’s museum into the garage," O’Neill said.

Noting the Pritzker family’s generous contributions to Millennium Park—including the eponymous pavilion—O’Neill said that if the museum does decide to move, Grant Park could land another signature building.

"This would be a huge endeavor," O’Neill said, adding that there is "a track record right across Columbus of [the Pritzker family’s] money going into an enormously popular asset."

Last edited by spyguy999; December 16th, 2005 at 02:56 AM.
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Old December 16th, 2005, 01:05 AM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy999
Noting the Pritzker family’s generous contributions to Millennium Park—including the eponymous pavilion—O’Neill said that if the museum does decide to move, Grant Park could land another signature building.
Daniel Liebskind? Norman Foster? Jeanne Gang? Santiago Calatrava? Helmut Jahn? Adrian Smith?

No architect can say no to the Pritzkers if they want to be the recipients of the prestigious prize for architecture.
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Old December 16th, 2005, 10:25 PM   #55
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Museum seeks $63 mil. more

December 16, 2005

BY KEVIN NANCE Architecture Critic Advertisement
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-art16.html

The goal for the Art Institute of Chicago's capital campaign to fund its planned building addition, designed by world-famous architect Renzo Piano and scheduled to open in 2009, has risen to $350 million, about $63 million more than previously expected.

The Modern Wing will cost about $260 million to build, with an additional $90 million needed for an operating endowment, museum officials said this week. The previous estimate for construction and the endowment was $287 million.

Museum director James Cuno said the extra money is needed to pay for a previously announced pedestrian bridge connecting the wing's west pavilion with Millennium Park; an expansion of the third floor of that pavilion to accommodate a restaurant; the structural shoring up of the pavilion to support the third floor and bridge, and the additional endowment to operate those facilities.

So far, $250 million in gifts and pledges has been raised -- a record amount for any Chicago cultural institution -- including 15 gifts of $5 million or more.

$50 mil. buys Modern Wing title

The Art Institute had been soliciting a donation of at least $50 million for the naming rights to the new wing. But in a highly unusual development last month, a group of about half a dozen anonymous donors pledged a $50 million gift on condition that the building -- which will house the Art Institute's modern and contemporary art collections -- be called the Modern Wing.

"This was a group of individuals who came together to comprise that naming gift on condition that we should not name it for an individual but instead give it this new title," Cuno said. "That made perfect sense to us, since Chicago is the home of modern architecture. The coincidence of that with the plans for the contents of the new wing was just too great. I think the title lifts the museum in a way that a single person's name wouldn't have done."

John H. Bryan, a veteran Chicago fund-raiser and chairman of the Art Institute's board of trustees, admitted that he'd never heard of such a request, but he said it wasn't that surprising.

"There are people who give gifts of this size just for the recognition, and there are others who have no interest in the recognition," Bryan said. "The fact is that rich people come in all different stripes. They are occasionally harder to tolerate than ordinary people because they get illusions of power and importance because of their wealth. But there are some rich people who are genuinely not seeking recognition, and in fact shy away from it. That's what we have here."

He conceded, too, that accepting the $50 million pledge from the donor consortium might cause the museum to miss out on a similar-size pledge from a single individual. "There are probably at least a dozen people in Chicago for whom a gift of that size would be quite easy," Bryan said. "The assumption is that we've lost that opportunity."

A year-round bridge?

Since the new wing's groundbreaking ceremony in May, Piano has continued to refine his design, with special attention given to the bridge. It will allow pedestrians to enter near the center of Millennium Park and walk high above Monroe Street to reach the third floor of the Modern Wing's west pavilion, with its restaurant and sculpture terrace.

The underside of the stainless steel bridge, originally envisioned as flat, is now curved in a way that Cuno compared to the hull of a sailboat. "Bridges are normally not very nice when you see them from below," Piano said in a telephone interview from his studio in Genoa, Italy. "This bridge will be very much seen from below, so we're paying a lot of attention to that surface."

Piano said he is also exploring ways to make the bridge usable year-round, "even on an icy day" -- an apparent reference to problems with Millennium Park's Frank Gehry-designed BP Bridge, which has had to be closed during much of the winter.

"It's a problem when the bridge is closed, very frustrating," Piano said. "We're looking at the idea of using a system to melt the ice, or maybe a little machine that will keep the bridge clean and safe -- a little elf, you know, a little robot? We're not sure yet. Wait and see."
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Old December 19th, 2005, 01:37 AM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi_Coruscant
Daniel Liebskind? Norman Foster? Jeanne Gang? Santiago Calatrava? Helmut Jahn? Adrian Smith?

No architect can say no to the Pritzkers if they want to be the recipients of the prestigious prize for architecture.
That's very true. But not Calatrava because I'd rather see him focus on Fordham, and maybe a bridge to DuSable Park. Second, make sure that fraud Gehry doesn't touch it.

Foster woud be good but I'd like to see him design a tower on the river, maybe Wolf Point.

ALSO

We got a mention a few days ago on Archidose. Thanks for the mention, John.

http://archidose.blogspot.com/2005/1...-and-tall.html
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Old December 27th, 2005, 10:17 PM   #57
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I don't think I've seen this animation before for the Freedom Museum.

http://www.imagefiction.com/anim-freedom.htm

George Bush Approves!
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Old January 6th, 2006, 01:09 AM   #58
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http://www.midwest.construction.com/...005_p17-07.asp
From Midwest Construction

U-505 Submarine Relocation
Award of Merit: Cultural
(12/01/2005)

The U-505 submarine has been an icon of Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry for 50 years.



But the artifact had been in drydock outside the main pavilion, and the boat's condition had significantly deteriorated.

An enclosed, climate-controlled exhibit space was needed. The space was sited 40 ft. under the north lawn. Visitors enter the exhibit from the east pavilion, walking along a ramp around the submarine, starting at the bow.

A wall dedicated to the American seamen of World War II who patrolled the North Atlantic is at the end of the exhibit.

The space was designed to recall World War II-era bunkers and drydocks, such as exposed concrete walls and arched steel girders to define the structure surrounding the boat.

Accommodating the Site

The museum's 1995 master plan for growth included an underground exhibit space for the sub.

This alleviated concerns that the museum would grow beyond its historic profile or disturb the Frederick Law Olmsted-designed landscape around the building. The north lawn was returned to a pristine condition after construction.

The building's foundations from 1893 were taken into account, as well as the Lake Michigan water that could seep into the 40-ft. pit.

The 700-ton sub itself, which is a National Historic Landmark, is a unique element. The boat was fragile, and the move was carefully planned.

The unusual form of a submarine enclosure is a direct result of two elements: the physical forces applied by the site and the aesthetic needs of the object itself.

The axial roof loads applied to the perimeter buttresses intersecting with the horizontal loads of the enclosing earth dictated the angle of inclination for the perimeter wall structure.

The exhibit space is approximately 10 ft. wider at the roof than the floor. This shape shows the submarine at its best.

The project's construction took place simultaneously with the city's restoration of Lake Shore Drive and pedestrian underpasses at the edge of the museum's site.

The enclosure's arched steel roof provided the necessary force to hold up to 2 to 7 ft. of soil but also was erected quickly after the sub was moved. This limited additional time the sub was exposed and eliminated the need for concrete form enclosures to be built around the sub.

The jury said, "The process was so unique, not only building it but the logistics involved. Plus, they preserved an internationally famous artifact. What a project!"

Key Players

Owner:
Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago

General Contractor:
W.E. O'Neil Construction Co., Chicago

Architect:
Lohan Caprile Goettsch Architects, Chicago

Program Manager:
Jones Lang LaSalle, Chicago

Structural Engineer:
Halvorson & Kaye Structural Engineers, Chicago

MEP/FP and Civil Engineer:
Primera Engineers, Chicago

Acoustical Consultant:
Shiner + Associates Inc., Chicago
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Old January 10th, 2006, 11:01 PM   #59
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Updated the front page a little. Does anyone know if the Hubbard Street Dance project is UC or not?

These were on SSP, taken by Chicago3rd:
Center on Halsted




There was a mini Spertus update on Archidose:
http://archidose.blogspot.com/2006/0...-underway.html

From northsidesoxfan
MBC
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Old January 13th, 2006, 06:05 PM   #60
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With the Field expansion which is under construction now will the building on the parking lot be developed at the same time or is this a while off?




Btw, this is an impressive thread
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