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Old February 23rd, 2006, 11:55 PM   #101
spyguy
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That library

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/n...ck=1&cset=true

Jahn to design extension of U. of C. library

Blair Kamin

Published February 23, 2006

Chicago architect Helmut Jahn and his firm, Murphy/Jahn, have been picked to design a $42 million extension of the University of Chicago's Joseph Regenstein Library.

The selection marks a shift for the university, which has relied on architects from outside Chicago for major recent buildings such as its Graduate School of Business. Jahn won the job from a field of 28 firms.

The extension, which will house 3.5 million volumes of print material, a conservation area and a reading room, will use high-density automated shelving instead of open stacks. It will be west of the library, completed in 1970 to the design of architect Walter Netsch, and south of Henry Moore's sculpture "Nuclear Energy" along Ellis Avenue between East 56th and 57th Streets, a university spokeswoman said.

Jahn is preparing a final design, the spokeswoman said. A groundbreaking is tentatively scheduled for August 2007.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 03:25 AM   #102
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OK that is nothing short of ******* awesome. Kamin says this "marks a departure" for U of C. Well, not really, in the most important sense. The U of C hires stellar architects, and Jahn is no exception to that. The fact that Jahn works in Chicago is incidental. I doubt the University officials said, "let's pick a local architect for this one." This was not a case of doing a global search for an architect and then conveniently choosing the local guy. Jahn could win this on merits alone. Of course it wouldn't have hurt him that the new State Street Village dorm at IIT is so close by, providing constant reminder of Jahn's ability to kick some major architectural ass.

My question is how this building is going to interact with the Regenstein. Will it be an entirely separate structure? I am worried about the Reg changing, because I am absolutely in love with its assymetric form at the moment. Its my understanding that a lot of people dislike the Reg, but I find its design exhiliarating, even better than Netzch's Northwestern library of similar design.

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Old March 1st, 2006, 03:45 AM   #103
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I walked by the Art Institue on my lunch hour and am happy to report that cassion work has started on the new wing!

There is still some demo work to do and they are still driving sheet but the cassion rig was definitely on site and actively drilling.
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Old March 1st, 2006, 03:58 AM   #104
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There is just so much construction going on this city. It's become a total fact of life. (well, moreso than before)
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Old March 1st, 2006, 04:19 AM   #105
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That's great news. I hope we get to see what the bridge looks like soon!
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Old March 4th, 2006, 01:12 AM   #106
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Does anyone have any pics of the old Shubert lobby/auditorium to compare? I've never had a reason to go there, so never seen it.
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Old March 4th, 2006, 07:29 PM   #107
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This is truly great news. I agree about the bridge, though--still no renderings...
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Old March 30th, 2006, 03:02 AM   #108
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Art Institute Update





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Old March 30th, 2006, 03:12 AM   #109
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Thanks for the shots. I'm glad that the people who donated that large chunk of cash were smart enough not to name the wing after themselves.
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Old March 31st, 2006, 06:00 PM   #110
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If you don't mind I'm going to steal your Spertus images and put them here as well:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagotom





Nickerson Mansion from Lynn Becker

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Old April 2nd, 2006, 07:17 PM   #111
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I challenge you guys to say the name of this thread really fast 3 times in a row
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Old April 2nd, 2006, 09:55 PM   #112
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I think I'm too hungover to say it once slow...
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Old April 4th, 2006, 05:07 PM   #113
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Chicago Children's Museum head Peter England delicately pursues a move from Navy Pier

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...,5755543.story

By Charles Storch
Tribune staff reporter
Published April 4, 2006


Before starting his first day as head of the Chicago Children's Museum, Peter England recalled, "I looked in the mirror and thought, `This is stupid. What right do you have to be coming to this place, which is a museum, which is about children, and you don't even know what they do?' "

Almost five years since then, this former corporate globetrotter may still find children mystifying -- even those three grown ones who are his own -- but neither he nor anyone else questions his suitability to lead this museum. He has helped to restore its finances, improve its appearance and underscore its role in early learning.

But all this has been child's play compared with what the museum's president and chief executive must now accomplish.

The museum is considering moving from its anchor position at hectic Navy Pier to a lightly traveled but prized site in north Grant Park, Daley Bicentennial Plaza. England must reach out to the many constituencies that guard every shrub in "Chicago's front yard" while not losing his footing in dealings with the pier -- a stretch worthy of the game Twister.

Since the museum went public in January with its preliminary proposal for Grant Park, the tall New Zealander with the sandy hair, deep-lined eyes and soft voice -- "I'm often accused of mumbling or speaking in a strange language," he acknowledged -- has been presenting the museum's case before park advocacy and neighborhood organizations and officials of the Chicago Park District, which has jurisdiction over Daley Bicentennial Plaza.

The reception so far has been mixed, all the more reason for England not to give notice at the pier. He has been negotiating with pier management for additional room at the popular lakefront attraction -- space the museum claims is its by right and should already be occupying. Though both sides contend talks have been amicable, their differing views on the use of the space suggest some tension.

"They have a lease to stay, and we are happy to have them stay," said Leticia Peralta Davis, chief executive of the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority, the state-city agency known as McPier that oversees the pier. "If their feasibility studies determine they would be better off somewhere else, we would be happy to accommodate them however we could."

At one time, the concerns of a midsize Midwest museum would have had no importance to England.

Born 61 years ago in Christchurch, New Zealand, where his parents ran a country grocery store, he roamed the world in a 33-year career with Unilever, the Anglo-Dutch consumer products giant. He held increasingly prominent positions in various Unilever personal products lines, lastly as president and chief executive of the Elizabeth Arden prestige cosmetics and fragrances unit.

In his five years at Arden, he was credited with restoring profits and brand image. But Unilever reportedly was impatient with the progress and decided to divest Arden. England resigned in January 2000, a year before Arden was sold.

At Unilever, he became friends with Ron Gidwitz, who in 1996 had followed his family-controlled Chicago firm, Helene Curtis Industries Inc., into the Unilever fold, but stayed only two years.

"He and I used to sit in the same Unilever meetings," England recalled. "He used to tease the senior management of Unilever in an extraordinary way."

Good sense of humor

During a break from his recent, failed bid for the GOP nomination for Illinois governor, Gidwitz said of those meetings, "If I thought things were wrong, I would speak my mind. Peter was quite good. Very politic, in the sense he wasn't bombastic. He has a good sense of humor, in an understated way."

After Unilever, England, his wife, Carol, and their son lived for 18 months in Australia. From there, they moved to Chicago, where they had only visited before but where their two daughters were living.

"We decided to reunite the family in Chicago," he said.

When a friend suggested him for the CEO's job at the Children's Museum, he resisted. But he met with its board and was won over -- although the $185,000-a-year compensation was, for him, quite modest.

"Probably my motives at the beginning were a little selfish, a way of introducing myself to Chicago," he said. "Since then, I've developed a real feeling of passion for this place."

Under his watch, the museum has reversed years of operating deficits and found new sponsors for exhibits. It also collaborated with early-learning experts to reformulate its mission, putting more emphasis on linking learning and play and on involving parents in their child's play-learning experience.

Dolores Kohl Kaplan, founder and former head of the Kohl Children's Museum -- which last year moved from Wilmette to larger quarters in Glenview -- said England successfully leveraged "his highly developed skills from the business world into his work at the Chicago Children's Museum."

As did Kohl's, England's museum felt the need for more room to fulfill its ambitions. The museum, which was founded in 1982, had relocated to Navy Pier in 1995, signing a 99-year lease at a token $1 a year. But with its attendance growing to about 500,000 a year, the museum at times felt squeezed in its 57,000 square feet there.

According to England, the museum in 2004 exercised an option in its lease to assume 20,000 square feet of nearby space, used by McPier for offices.

Peralta Davis said the museum had submitted plans that called for new exhibits and programs in that space. She said McPier was prepared to relocate its offices so the museum could break ground.

"Then [the museum] wrote us and said, `We don't have the funding secured,' and that they weren't going to do the expansion that we had been working on for about a year's time," she said. "With that notice, we're sort of on hold right now."

But England said he wanted the space primarily for offices and storage, freeing up room in the museum proper for more exhibits and programming, including children's theater. He said the museum was prepared to invest about $31 million in the expansion.

"We were due to break ground last August. Around May of last year, the pier decided that they were looking at the whole plan for the facility and put ours on hold," he said, referring to a proposed pier makeover. "At that stage, we and the board said, `Let's explore other options.'"

Even if the museum decides to leave the pier, it could take years before plans for a building elsewhere were approved and construction completed. Knowing it will be at the pier for a while at least and wanting to use that 20,000 square feet in the interim, the museum must proceed delicately with McPier as it explores other options.

Move to Grant Park

England would not say who first proposed moving to Grant Park, but Gigi Pritzker Pucker, the museum's chairman and a member of the powerful Chicago clan, is believed to have advanced the notion with city and park officials. Daley Bicentennial Plaza is east of Millennium Park, across a pedestrian bridge from the Pritzker Pavilion.

Pritzker Pucker declined to comment.

The museum has been looking at the site of a fieldhouse nestled near East Randolph Drive. With project manager Jones Lang LaSalle, the museum has devised a concept plan for a 100,000 square-foot structure that would burrow into two levels of the Monroe Street parking garage directly below. A glass atrium rising about 45 feet above Randolph would serve as the entrance and help light the three museum floors below.

The museum has proposed building a substitute fieldhouse nearby that would be twice the size of the current one, a 30-year-old structure in need of repair.

Neighborhood and parks groups that have heard the museum's pitch generally like the idea of having such an amenity in the plaza. But they have expressed concern about having such paid-admission activities in the park, attracting additional traffic, replacing fieldhouse programs and relocating a small but heavily used skating rink just outside the fieldhouse.

"I have committed to saving the ice skating rink," vowed Robert O'Neill, president of the Grant Park Conservancy.

England wouldn't project a new museum's cost, saying plans are too preliminary. He said he finds "scary" the prospect of having to raise tens of millions of dollars. Luckily for him, a Pritzker is at his side.

He speaks animatedly of a stand-alone museum, new exhibits and collaborations with the Park District and cultural institutions near the plaza.

"This should be a place of wonder, joy, beauty and magic for children," said England. It is a favorite line for him, but one he credits to a museum patron with a superior aesthetic.

"I'm a New Zealander," said England, all Kiwi modesty. "My idea of culture is a little agriculture."

----------

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Old April 6th, 2006, 12:32 AM   #114
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/n...ationworld-hed

Museum puts freedom 1st
A new Michigan Avenue attraction pulls no punches in its effort to inspire visitors to value what many take for granted

By William Mullen

Tribune staff reporter
Published April 5, 2006

Freedom, as a new museum in Chicago takes pains to say, is an inalienable right of all humans that is difficult to achieve and sometimes disagreeable to live with.

The McCormick Tribune Freedom Museum, opening to the public Tuesday in Tribune Tower on North Michigan Avenue, is designed to make visitors confront some uncomfortable, sometimes volatile topics.

Do high school students have the right to wear T-shirts to school showing their support for gay rights? Can the Nazi Party stage an uninvited march into a town heavily populated with Jewish people? Were the lyrics to the Everly Brothers' 1950s hit song "Wake Up Little Susie" so morally subversive that it should not have been played on public airwaves?

Built at a cost of more than $10 million, the museum primarily focuses on the 1st Amendment freedoms granted to all Americans by the U.S. Constitution's Bill of Rights. That amendment guarantees five basic freedoms--of speech, of religion, of the press, of assembly and to petition for redress of grievances.

The two-story, 10,000-square-foot museum avoids sanctimony and flag-waving, instead offering a candid look at 1st Amendment ideals and how difficult they are to uphold. It is funded by the McCormick Tribune Foundation, an independent, non-profit foundation with substantial stock holdings in Tribune Co., which owns the Chicago Tribune.

"We view our mission as a fairly straightforward," said Dave Anderson, the museum's executive director. "We want to get our visitors to understand, value and protect freedom."

The museum employs an array of audio-visual and interactive technology to examine incidents in which 1st Amendment freedoms have been challenged. Visitors are nudged to make up their own minds on the issues.

Engaging for all ages

Its primary audience, said Anderson, is middle school and high school students, whom the museum hopes to bring in by the busload. But museum designers also want to attract a significant public audience beyond students and sought to make its exhibits engaging for all ages.

A national survey commissioned by the museum for its opening showed that Americans can name the five main family characters in the cartoon "The Simpsons" far more easily than they can name the five 1st Amendment freedoms.

"The museum is an idea that grew out of the Tribune Co.'s past with [former editor and publisher] Col. Robert McCormick, who was a great, powerful advocate for the 1st Amendment and civic involvement," said Anderson. "His interests melded perfectly with the Freedom Museum."

Anderson, who said he believes his museum's location at 445 N. Michigan Ave. is "ideal," acknowledges there are some critics who question "whether or not folks on Michigan Avenue are in a frame of mind to want to go into a museum."

Some thought the 2004 closure of the Terra Museum of American Art two blocks north of Tribune Tower was due to its location, though others blamed a weakly conceived vision of the museum's purpose.

Officials at the Loyola University Museum of Art at 820 N. Michigan Ave., which opened Oct. 8, believe it owes much of its success--17,500 visitors to date--to being on the busy avenue.

"It has been really wonderful," said Lisa Torgerson, the Loyola museum's director of development. "Being on the avenue gives us a lot of exposure to tourists and shoppers looking for a little bit of culture."

Julie Burros, director of cultural planning for the city's Department of Cultural Affairs, said she thinks the Freedom Museum will benefit greatly from its location.

"There is a tremendous amount of foot traffic there and big windows to peer into to see what's inside," she said. "Tribune Tower is such an important building, an icon of the city that people go out of their way just to see, so that helps too."

The museum relies on exhibit techniques rather than artifacts to get its ideas across. Burros called it "the first museum in Chicago that works with ideas and not with stuff."

A 21st Century concept

"It is a sort of 21st Century concept for museums that also should attract people," she said.

The museum also will feature a revolving collection of historical artifacts connected to 1st Amendment issues, most on temporary loan from other museums and individuals. Among them is one of 25 existing copies of the Dunlap Broadside, the Declaration of Independence as it was published by Philadelphia printer John Dunlap on July 4, 1776. It is on loan from the Chicago History Museum.

Visitors 6 and older will be charged a $5 admission fee. "We have seen research that shows visitors appreciate the museum more if a value is assigned to the visit," Anderson said.

But any passerby can look for free at the museum's dramatic centerpiece in its entryway rotunda: a two-story sculpture titled "12151791," taking its name from the date the 1st Amendment was ratified, Dec. 15, 1791.

The work of San Diego artists Peter Bernheim and Amy Larimer, it is composed of 800 reflective, stainless-steel plates the size of a piece of writing paper, suspended from the ceiling by steel cables. Each cable represents a 5-year segment of history following the amendment's ratification, and each plate is inscribed with thoughts on freedom by people living in that time. It will be added to until the 250th anniversary of the ratification on Dec. 15, 2041.

All school groups will be admitted free, and teachers will be offered free curriculum plans to prepare their students for the visit. The museum is offering bus scholarships to qualifying schools to pay for bus rentals.
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Old April 12th, 2006, 12:55 AM   #115
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So it opened today. I saw something about it on FOX, seemed pretty good.
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Old April 12th, 2006, 01:45 AM   #116
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Isn't that whole Museum a big slap at Daley?
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Old April 12th, 2006, 02:23 AM   #117
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Has any more detailed information come out about the proposed Children's Museum? The building itself, I mean. The way it is currently, the shape of the "3-story atrium" is not pleasing at all. I'm hoping they get a major redesign, if indeed they do decide to move.
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Old April 12th, 2006, 06:21 AM   #118
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Centre on Halsted this past Sunday:
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Old April 14th, 2006, 01:01 AM   #119
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Great...

Quote:
Considerable change has taken place concerning the plans and expectations of the Chicago Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center.

A number of issues have arisen as follows:

* The location of the project has been rescinded and alternate sites are being considered.
* The parameters of the proposed construction budget have been altered and are being re-evaluated within The Salvation Army.
* The program expectations are under review and will be dependent upon evolving budget and site parameters.
* The anticipated timeline is, of course, now invalid given the impact of the changes to budget and site.

Pursuant to these issues, and in keeping with the parameters stated in the ‘Competition Regulations’, Paragraph 15, The Salvation Army does herein give notification that The Salvation Army is exercising the right to not proceed with the project planned for 47th and State Street.

The Salvation Army wishes to thank all interested parties and participants for the time and energy expended during this process and will make available information when appropriate to do so - when a new project site, budget and program have been defined.

Please direct any inquiries to The Salvation Army Metropolitan Division.
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Old April 14th, 2006, 04:19 AM   #120
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Isn't this old news? The Salvation Army community center project was scrapped because 3rd Ward Alderman Dorothy Tillman blocked it. Yes, I think she is certifiably nuts.
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