daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 15th, 2009, 04:05 PM   #341
EricIsHim
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 4,397
Likes (Received): 28

Finally~~~
__________________
EricIsHim
My PhotoBucket
EricIsHim no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 19th, 2009, 03:23 PM   #342
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Now create a harbour we can take pride in
14 January 2009
South China Morning Post

After years of making and revising plans, the government has finally unveiled a development blueprint for the former Kai Tak airport site that looks set to go ahead. At long last, officials have come up with a viable plan that seems to have bypassed the sort of pitfalls and minefields that held up development of Tamar, the Central-Wan Chai bypass and the West Kowloon arts hub. Moreover, the economic climate has worsened, changing public sentiment. It is easier, now, for the government to push ahead with major infrastructure and development projects, given the need to provide work and stimulate the economy.

Along with West Kowloon, the 320-hectare Kai Tak site is the most valuable piece of vacant urban land we have, and one that does not have roads blocking access to our beautiful waterfront. We must make sure it stays that way. The site's development is important to the whole city, not only to those who will move to live there. One major concern is the relative geographic isolation of the site. Planners must ensure easy access for future residents, visitors and tourists. Its success will very much depend on accessibility.

There are two reasons why the latest blueprint will be acceptable to the public. First, the government will pay most of the bill, which will amount to more than HK$100 billion over 12 years. This will help the administration avoid any allegations of collusion with big business interests. Suspicions of this kind contributed to problems for the original plan for West Kowloon to be built by a single developer. The government was forced to backtrack and parcel out the site as individual projects for different bidders. The proposed cruise terminal, a major component of the Kai Tak site's development, was originally to be built and run by a single private operator. But several private bids failed to meet minimum government requirements. Now, the government will be the main builder.

Second, the government recognises the Kai Tak site amounts to a sub-district, so it has something for everyone: schools, public housing flats, private residential development, government offices, parks, a cleaned-up nullah to be turned into a river, a major stadium, tourist attractions and shopping malls. An MTR station connecting Sha Tin and Central will be built, and possibly a monorail. There is also the possibility of a bridge linking the tip of the runway to Kwun Tong. Questions have been raised about whether building this will contravene harbour protection laws against reclamation and block the flow of vessels. It must be carefully thought through.

With the latest blueprint, the government has made an attempt to avoid flaws in the way it had conducted previous public consultations. Since 2004, it has made extensive use of the Harbourfront Enhancement Committee to gauge opinions across different sectors regarding the Kai Tak development. In the past, critics have accused officials of failing to highlight the salient points and hiding the real agenda behind major public projects. In turn, officials have become upset that attempts at transparency have opened them up to attacks and criticism. So even now, Kai Tak's planners should listen to legitimate concerns about their project and, where possible, adopt changes that can bring improvement.

With the Kai Tak blueprint, all the major development plans are now in place. The future landscape of our city is taking shape. Our children will have to live with this for a long time. Let's now create a new harbourside of which Hong Kong can be proud.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 27th, 2009, 03:45 AM   #343
icedragon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1
Likes (Received): 0

hkskyline, I appreciate your updates on Kai Tak. Cheers and thanks.

Last edited by icedragon; January 27th, 2009 at 04:05 AM.
icedragon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 27th, 2009, 10:32 AM   #344
jim_ozora
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 29
Likes (Received): 0

What scale are of the residential buildings going to be?

I really hope they don't go gung-ho and build massive 屏風樓 there, hope they
won't try to maximise profits for these visual eyesores.
We deserve better !
jim_ozora no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2009, 04:41 AM   #345
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

By nislrahc from dchome :

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2009, 11:45 PM   #346
darioperu
Registered User
 
darioperu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: LIMA
Posts: 3,816
Likes (Received): 88

QUE BELLA CIUDAD!!
__________________
.



HILO: LIMA DAMERO DE PIZARRO O LIMA CUADRADA:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...954252&page=16
darioperu no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 12:13 AM   #347
SilentStrike
Registered User
 
SilentStrike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Wassenaar
Posts: 1,756
Likes (Received): 192

i really really like this plan. How deep is victoria harbour?
SilentStrike no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 6th, 2009, 02:07 AM   #348
Cunning Linguist
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 353
Likes (Received): 4

Victoria Harbour is famed for being deep - it is Hong Kong's only natural resource and is why the port sprang up in the first place.

I hope they reclaim the nullah and then put a moritorium on all reclamation for good. What's the point of having it there?
Cunning Linguist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 3rd, 2009, 04:55 AM   #349
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Hong Kong's battle to preserve waterfront
5 February 2009
Financial Times

Six of the 14 stations on Hong Kong's Island underground railway line are named after bays or streams that no longer exist, obliterated decades ago by landfill projects that greatly diminished what had been one of the world's most beautiful harbours.

The government's original redevelopment plan for Kai Tak, the city's former airport, threatened to eradicate Kowloon Bay, the last vestige of the once spacious Victoria Harbour.

But when a 12-year, HK$100bn ($12.9bn, €10bn, £8.9bn) blueprint for Kai Tak was finally released last month, environmental activists were pleasantly surprised to find that the Hong Kong government had taken a "zero reclamation option".

"It is a major success - there will not be one square foot of reclamation," says Winston Chu, a solicitor who has led the fight to preserve what remains of the harbour. "This is the last bay left."

Mr Chu, who began his crusade in 1994 at the urging of his late mother, and his fellow campaigners owe much of their success to Hong Kong's independent judiciary and the rule of law, tools not available to would-be citizen activists in other Chinese cities.

Mr Chu has won five of seven lawsuits against the government. Another victory was the protection of the harbour bill adopted on the eve of the former British colony's return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. It declared that the harbour "is to be protected and preserved as a special public asset and a natural heritage of Hong Kong people, and for that purpose there shall be a presumption against reclamation".

Six years later, a legal test case set a high bar for proposed reclamations, saying they could proceed only if they met an "overriding public need". One that did is a bypass expressway to be built on the controversial Central and Wanchai (Cantonese for "Little Bay") reclamation, which is in full swing and will reshape the waterfront of Hong Kong's main business district.

Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's secretary for development, calls it "the final, final piece of reclamation - that's it".

"We respect the law," Ms Lam says. "We should do much better on enhancing the waterfront because Victoria Harbour is such a natural asset . . . It's also about respecting the history of the place." Much of the damage to Hong Kong's harbour was in fact done decades ago by British rulers trapped by huge development pressures in the cramped colony and their fiscal dependence on land sale revenues. Roughly half of Kowloon Bay was lost to reclamations completed by 1977; the new plan for Kai Tak will preserve the bay's remaining 300 hectares.

Mr Chu jokes that Hong Kong's former rulers, perhaps homesick for the Thames, set out to turn Victoria Harbour into Victoria river. He compares the government sanctioned erosion of the harbour that is the city's raison d'être and gave it its name - "Hong Kong" is Cantonese for "fragrant harbour" - to the slow but steady mastications of a silk worm. "It's only one small bite at a time - chomp, chomp, chomp - but then the leaf is gone," he says.

While activists pledge to remain vigilant of future landfill encroachments, their focus is turning to the revitalisation of Hong Kong's dispiriting waterfront. Public promenades are piecemeal and often truncated by industrial installations.

These waterfront wastelands contrast sharply with Hong Kong's world class natural park system, which encompasses almost half the territory's land area. When people seek solace and natural beauty, they head to the hills not the harbour.

"There's no vision for what the harbour might look like one day," says Margaret Brooke, who chairs the best practice committee at the Harbour Business Forum, a concern group backed by many of Hong Kong's leading companies.

"Providing a [continuous] promenade is going to be a nightmare because you've got so much engineering stuff on the harbour . . . We just have to improve it inch by inch. It's a dead economic asset at the moment."

Ms Lam agrees: "We have tended to put a lot of functional things by the waterfront." She says she maintains "an open mind" about the possible creation of a more powerful harbour authority. But she also defends the government's current "bits and pieces" approach to harbour development, citing an HK$18m project to pedestrianise a 200-metre stretch along Kowloon Bay. "We don't want to lose any opportunity to make improvements."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 10th, 2009, 12:09 AM   #350
diddy
Registered User
 
diddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 217
Likes (Received): 12

HK never cease to amaze me, always finding space where to create great urban environments! Go HK !
diddy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 16th, 2009, 04:20 PM   #351
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Kai Tak bidders sought
7 March 2009
South China Morning Post

The government is inviting preliminary applications for the design and building of the cruise terminal building at Kai Tak.

Application details have been gazetted. Forms can be obtained from the Architectural Services Department and must be submitted by March 31. The department will then "prequalify" four candidates to take part in the tender exercise.

The Tourism Commission said it was working simultaneously to prepare for the invitation of tenders for the site formation and the cruise terminal building. The move will shorten the construction lead time.

The government will seek funding approval from the Legislative Council later this year for carrying out the site formation work, which is expected to begin before the end of the year. It is hoped the first berth can begin operation by mid-2013.

A Development Bureau spokesman said the 320-hectare development would include residential and commercial buildings, a sports stadium, a cruise terminal and a park. The site has been vacant since the new airport opened in 1998.

The Kai Tak project - drawn up 10 years ago with plans to reclaim about 200 hectares - underwent a major review in 2004 after a court ruled that harbour reclamation had to pass a test of overriding public need. The development scale was reduced to avoid reclamation, and building heights were lowered.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 26th, 2009, 06:37 PM   #352
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Green issues spur rethink of Kai Tak bridge project
Hong Kong Standard
Wednesday, March 25, 2009

The government is having second thoughts about the proposed bridge connecting the former Kai Tak airport southern runway to Kwun Tong because of harbor reclamation concerns, it was claimed yesterday.

The proposed bridge over the Kwun Tong typhoon shelter was set to connect the old town with the Kai Tak redevelopment and at the same time support the environment-friendly monorail system.

But the government is now looking for an alternative route or the possibility of extending the rail system by connecting the monorail to the Kwun Tong and Kowloon Bay MTR stations, the source said.

The monorail system is a part of the final stage of the Kai Tak development targeted to be completed in 2021.

Meanwhile, the government plans to ask the Legislative Council in May for HK$1.185 billion to start four public works projects for the Kai Tak development.

Work on the first two projects may begin in the summer, and all four projects are expected to create 739 jobs.

Infrastructure at the north apron area of the old airport will cost HK$564.9 million. It includes the construction of new roads; the realignment of Concorde Road and the extension and widening of Kai Wah Street; construction of footbridges; improvements to existing subways; and the construction of box culverts.

The second project, costing HK$538.1 million, will cover advance infrastructure works at the southern runway including the construction of new roads; improvements to the existing bridge, roads and junctions; construction of a fireboat berth; and a sewage pumping station.

The third and fourth programs are design and consultancy works costing HK$50 million and HK$32 million, respectively.

The Legco panel on development will discuss funding approval Tuesday.

Applications for three other projects - a district cooling system, sewage system in Kowloon City and Truck Road T2 - have been submitted to the panels on environmental affairs and transport.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2009, 06:23 PM   #353
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Plan for Kai Tak monorail may be extended into east Kowloon
25 March 2009
South China Morning Post

Residents of Kowloon Bay and Kwun Tong may be able to commute to the future Kai Tak City by monorail under the latest plan for bridging the gap between east Kowloon and the former airport site.

A monorail is already proposed to run the length of the new city, from the tip of the former runway in the south to Kai Tak MTR station in the north.

Now the Civil Engineering and Development Department is looking into whether it could be extended to east Kowloon.

A new bridge had been planned from the tip of the old runway to Kwun Tong but a recent study by the department found this might not be feasible in the short term because the construction could infringe the Protection of the Harbour Ordinance.

"To allow vessels to pass under the bridge, it would have to be very high, which is not very user-friendly," a spokesman for the Development Bureau said.

As an alternative, the department is studying the feasibility of extending the monorail to neighbouring areas, including Kowloon Bay and Kwun Tong, across an existing bridge.

The preferred route would be from the MTR stations in Kwun Tong and Kowloon Bay to Kai Tak station on the Sha Tin-Central Link. The rail system is expected to be completed in 2021, subject to the detailed design.

"The extended rail link looks more user-friendly and it serves the same purpose, strengthening the connection of old and new districts," the bureau's spokesman said.

But the spokesman said the study was still at a preliminary stage and a lot of problems had to be solved to implement the plan.

He said the government had to ensure streets in old areas were wide enough for the monorail.

Construction work on the monorail could also be complicated by the busy road traffic and the public utilities carried underground.

The Development Bureau will seek funding of HK$1.18 billion from the Legislative Council for the infrastructure and detailed design of Kai Tak, including a study of the monorail. The infrastructure is expected to be completed in three phases: public housing, cruise terminal and waterfront promenade in 2013; residential development, underground street to Kowloon City and San Po Kong, heliport and Kai Tak station in 2016; and monorail, stadium complex, remaining residential and commercial developments, and the last stage of the district cooling system in 2021.

The first phase is expected to commence in July this year.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 8th, 2009, 05:16 AM   #354
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Panel smells trouble for Kai Tak nullah plan
1 April 2009
Hong Kong Standard

The stench of the infamous Kai Tak nullah could blight a cruise terminal planned for the site, lawmakers fear _ despite claims by government engineers that they can clean it up.

Democratic Party lawmaker Lee Wing-tat fears the lingering odor will drive tourists away.

He outlined his worries as the Legislative Council's panel on development began discussions on giving the green light to HK$1.185 billion in funding for four public works programs to transform the old airport site.

One of the programs is made up of site investigations and design of the environmental improvement works in the Kai Tak Approach Channel and Kwun Tong typhoon shelter.

It also includes bioremediation treatment, or the clean-up of contaminated sediment, and the creation of a 600-meter-wide opening on the former runway.

The majority of lawmakers said they have reservations about the government's claim because odor problems in Yau Ma Tei typhoon shelter, Belcher Bay in Sai Wan and Sha Tin's Shing Mun River are still bothering residents after years of work.

Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong's Chan Kam-lam said the party supports the projects in principle. But the Kowloon City District Council and residents of To Kwa Wan are worried that once a 600-meter opening is created on the northern runway, the sediment will flush to To Kwa Wan causing a stench.

The Civil Engineering and Development Department said tests on a sample obtained from the Kai Tak Approach Channel and a computer simulation showed satisfactory results.

The department will not create the opening unless repeated tests prove the To Kwa Wan neighborhood will not be polluted.

Secretary for Development Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor said the government will continue to listen to public opinion.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 14th, 2009, 04:50 PM   #355
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Cruise ships in HK set to get a wholelot bigger even before Kai Tak's ready
10 April 2009
South China Morning Post

A leading Europe-based cruise operator plans to base bigger, more modern liners in the city and may do so as soon as 2011 - though they will have to dock at container terminals until the first berth at the new Kai Tak cruise terminal is ready in 2013.

Italy's Costa Crociere cruise line plans to base ships weighing between 90,000 gross tonnes and 115,000 gross tonnes in the city.

Until now, the biggest cruise liner to have been based in the region is Royal Caribbean's 79,491 tonne Rhapsody of the Seas, though it was replaced by a slightly smaller ship that can more easily dock at existing terminals in the region, including Ocean Terminal in Tsim Sha Tsui.

The European line's 28,400 tonne, 800-passenger Costa Allegra has operated from Hong Kong since 2006. Yesterday, the line's 53,000 tonne Costa Classica arrived to begin service. A second 53,000 tonne liner, the Costa Romantica, will replace the smaller Allegra in May next year.

Although these ships can dock at Ocean Terminal, bigger liners such as the 105,000 tonne Costa Magica, have to berth at the container port in Kwai Chung or anchor in the middle of Victoria Harbour.

The limited berths at Ocean Terminal also mean that not all ships can dock there when they want to. The arrival of the Costa Classica meant the Costa Allegra would have to berth at Kwai Chung today, Massimo Brancaleoni, Costa's vice-president of Asia-Pacific operations, said.

He hopes Costa's bigger liners will be based in Hong Kong "very soon".

"But for sure, it will not be in 2010," he added.

"If we find the same kind of growth rate that we had in the past years, maybe we can consider starting in 2011. But this decision will only be taken in the coming six to eight months because I need to see how active the bookings are for Romantica in 2010."

Costa has cut prices by single-digit percentage points because of the economic downturn, but Mr Brancaleoni said the outlook for the cruise industry was "pretty good".

The government has decided to build a cruise terminal at the former Kai Tak airport after rejecting tenders from the private sector to build it. The first berth is expected to be ready by mid-2013, though terminal facilities may not be completed until 2015.

Singapore expects to complete its International Cruise Terminal next year. It will have two berths capable of accommodating ships nearly twice as big as the largest liners Costa is planning to send to Hong Kong - the 220,000 tonne Genesis-class vessels operated by Royal Caribbean.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 15th, 2009, 11:03 AM   #356
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,495
Likes (Received): 17807

Speak out for Kai Tak promenade
15 April 2009
South China Morning Post

Would you like to enjoy an outdoor dining experience on the waterfront of the former Kai Tak airport - the last large piece of undeveloped urban land in Hong Kong?

If the answer is yes, now is the time to speak out, suggests Ah Pak.

Eric Wong Chun-yu, a co-head of Asia property research at UBS, supports an e-mail campaign launched by Designing Hong Kong, a group founded by four individuals including Christine Loh Kung-wai, the chief executive of think-tank Civic Exchange, to oppose the government's current intentions for the site.

There will be no outdoor dining under the government proposal since 80 per cent of the site will be given over to roads.

"Recent international studies showed that every great harbour front, whether in Singapore, Sydney, Vancouver or Cape Town, have roads away from the waterfront. Properties shield the waterfront promenade and provide facilities for culture, entertainment, restaurants and marine support," the group said. "A promenade could be used by pedestrians and cyclists for leisure, recreation, with facilities for outdoor seating and boating."

The solution: just set back the roads from the waterfront and follow the example of successful waterfronts around the world.

Mr Wong declares he is not a member of Designing Hong Kong but shares their view by forwarding the e-mail to friends, relatives, and people of influence to spread the idea.

The roads and the upgrading of the existing taxiway bridge will cost HK$1.1 billion of public money.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 15th, 2009, 07:18 PM   #357
altuzarra27
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 33
Likes (Received): 2

The Development Bureau will seek $1.185 billion for the Kai Tak Development's detailed design and construction, and the detailed design of environmental improvement works to the Kai Tak approach channel.

casas rurales en tarragona |casas rurales en granada |casas rurales en cadiz |casas rurales en alicante
altuzarra27 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 17th, 2009, 01:18 PM   #358
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,404
Likes (Received): 25

HK Gov't Press Release:
Infrastructure Works at Kai Tak North Apron gazetted

Tenders invited for infrastructure works for Kai Tak Development
__________________
A Hong Kong Guy who was born in HK!
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 17th, 2009, 01:42 PM   #359
jhalsey
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 1,262
Likes (Received): 182

Could put a few good sized skyscrapers there.
jhalsey no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 17th, 2009, 08:23 PM   #360
Halawala
Fairouzy
 
Halawala's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Doha
Posts: 7,868
Likes (Received): 265

You could have a Sheik Zayed Road-style development in that area. For those not familiar with SZR, its basically a road in Dubai lined with skyscrapers.
__________________
@Halawala
#R4BIA #thankyouHAMAD
Halawala no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
hong kong

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu