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Old September 7th, 2006, 05:04 PM   #161
Rachmaninov
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Good news... I wonder what the two developments would look like...
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Old September 26th, 2006, 07:57 AM   #162
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啟德跑道尾擬建觀光塔
08月 17日

【東方日報專訊】被稱為市區最後一塊珍貴用地的舊啟德機場,將可能興建本港首個觀光塔,規模媲美澳門旅遊塔和上海東方明珠塔,可讓遊人從高空俯瞰維港美景。民建聯東南九龍發展計劃小組召集人發表意見陳鑑林引述規劃署消息指,正考慮於啟德跑道尾興建觀光塔,成為繼郵輪碼頭、多用途體育館後區內第三大地標。旅遊業議會總幹事董耀中歡迎構思,但建議觀光塔須設旋轉餐廳、展覽場地等配套。

規劃署稱建議可接受

規劃署官員上周三與陳鑑林會晤,收集民建聯對啟德初步規劃大綱圖的意見。陳向本報透露,署方代表對民建聯提倡跑道尾興建觀光塔的建議稱「可以接受」,會研究在大綱圖加入觀光塔的可行性。事實上,與香港關係密切的上海和澳門,均分別建有全球最三高(四百六十八米) 及全球第十高 (三百三十八米) 的觀光塔。

陳又指,維港景色世界知名,相信觀光塔會深受遊客歡迎,但觀光塔須高過跑道中央的廿層高住宅。身兼城規會成員的觀塘區議員陳華裕認為,單純建觀光塔的點綴性意義較大,建議將觀光塔低層作為連接觀塘與啟德行人橋的柱躉,為居民帶來方便。
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Old October 20th, 2006, 03:15 AM   #163
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50-storey hotel planned for Kai Tak
Government prepared to lift 100-metre height limit for project to be built near the end of former airport runway
18 October 2006
South China Morning Post

The government is preparing to lift the 100-metre height restriction laid down in its redevelopment plan for the former Kai Tak airport to allow for a 200-metre hotel of about 50 storeys to be built near the end of the old runway.

A government source said the proposed building would have a public viewing deck on the rooftop.

Unionist Chan Yuen-han dubbed the arrangement a property project, and said the hotel would monopolise the best view and block southeast winds. Ms Chan was angry that the government had rushed to gazette the proposal.

But Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong legislator Chan Kam-lam welcomed the proposal, which reflected the party's submission."We wanted the government to build a viewing tower at the end of the runway. They are responding to us - 200 metres is appropriate for [a] viewing [platform]," he said.

A draft development plan was released yesterday after planning officials analysed 230 written submissions and views expressed in 20 open forums in July and August.

Under the proposal, the former airport and surrounding area would be turned into a sports, tourism and business hub with three times more grade-A office space than the two International Finance Centre buildings combined.

While the plot ratio, or ratio of total floor area to plot size, would be capped at five for residential development, the ratio for commercial buildings would be nine. The development would provide housing for 86,000 people, a 27.3-hectare stadium complex and a cruise terminal.

The source said: "We are prepared to build a third berth for the cruise terminal. But we're not making any decision until the first two berths have been completed."

Responding to demands from political parties, the revised proposal would turn the depot site reserved for the Sha Tin-to-Central rail link into open space and add two underground walkways linking Kai Tak, Kowloon City and San Po Kong.

Land would be reserved for a monorail with eight stops.

The DAB has demanded that a bridge be built to link the southern tip of the runway and Kwun Tong MTR station, and the source said the government would continue to explore the suggestion, but it could involve some reclamation.

Some changes have been made to the development mix. The new plan would provide:

Less land for commercial development (office, hotel, retail), but more mixed development (residential, hotel and retail);

Less land for high-density and low-rise residential development;

More land for government and community facilities;

Larger areas for tourism development;

More open space and less land for roads.

Planning officials will present the revised proposal to the Town Planning Board, the Harbourfront Enhancement Committee and Kowloon City and Wong Tai Sin district councils in coming weeks.
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Old October 23rd, 2006, 06:06 AM   #164
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Secrecy over Kai Tak cruise terminal generates waves of questions
20 October 2006
South China Morning Post

"The consortium chosen to develop a cruise terminal at Kai Tak will have the right to operate the terminal on the former airport site for more than 30 years."

SCMP, October 19

PERHAPS WE'LL GET around to building it then before those 30 years are up. Chief Executive Donald Tsang Yam-kuen had been expected to present details in his policy address last week but no luck and the leaks we are now getting are still very short on detail.

Mr Tsang's reluctance is understandable. He has come a cropper on this idea once already. In his 1999 budget speech as financial secretary, he announced approval in principle of a cruise terminal in North Point to be built by a private developer.

That developer was tycoon Li Ka-shing but nothing came of the idea, perhaps because of the ruckus caused by the announcement in that same budget speech of another land grant (Cyberport) made without auction or tender to a member of Mr Li's family. It was just as well perhaps as North Point is not the right place.

Last year the government invited expressions of interest in the construction of a cruise terminal and got six replies. Only one of them proposed a terminal at the Kai Tak site, although Kai Tak had already been highlighted as a government preference. The others generally picked locations more convenient to their existing land banks. All were rejected.

The key date is now 2012 because this is the expiry date of Wharf Holdings' 50-year land grant on the existing terminal at the tip of the Tsim Sha Tsui peninsula. The location has been ruled out for a new terminal and the government will take the site back.

Thus Kai Tak it is to be and, judging by the latest version of the Kai Tak redevelopment plan, the terminal will feature two berths at the end of the old runway on a total of 13.3 hectares with related hotel, retail and entertainment facilities.

And now come the questions:

What is this mention of a consortium? There is no reason why it has to be a consortium. A single developer might do the job just as well, in fact perhaps better. Do we have a consortium stipulated because the government was embarrassed by proposing the single developer route for the West Kowloon Reclamation project and then had to reconsider?

Has this consortium already been formed or invited to bid for the project? There would normally be no reason to raise the question except that our government has an occasional habit of putting the cart before the horse in this way for big projects. Witness Cyberport and that North Point cruise terminal idea. There are other examples.

If no consortium already has the nod, how will the project be tendered? We are told that this is to be a 30-year build, operate and transfer project, which implies that the winner covers the cost of construction and operation, runs it for 30 years and then turns it all over to the government. Are we to have a completely open tendering process for this? Have we invited foreign terminal operators to participate?

Will the public purse get a share of the operating revenues? Thirty years is a mighty long time. Let's spare ourselves the embarrassment of awarding the project for one low lump sum and then seeing the winner generate profits of billions a year, all of which he keeps.

What about the land element? Will the winning bidder get the land for free and have to cover only the cost of constructing the facilities or will he have to pay a commercial price for the land? The land could be the single biggest cost element and we give land away for free much too easily in this town.

What about the hotels, retail and entertainment facilities? These facilities will be the biggest revenue drivers and there will be plenty of room for them. A site area of 13.3 hectares translates to 1.43 million square feet and this is site area, not floor area. Will these facilities also revert to the government in 30 years or will the developer keep them?

Has anyone in government yet obtained firm commitments from cruise line operators? Hong Kong has never been a big destination for cruises. Passenger arrivals from seagoing vessels amount to only 375,000 a year, a bare 0.38 per cent of all arrivals. How can we be sure that people will really come? New York demanded big multi-year passenger commitments from cruise operators before it built a terminal.

There are plenty more good questions among these lines and I am sure government officials will tell us that they will all be answered in good time. Trouble is, however, that good time does not always mean good answers and there is often nothing we can do about them any longer by that time.

This project appears a little too secretive for my liking in the way that only dribs and drabs of news on it have come out.

We need the terms and conditions clearly and fully stated now.
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Old October 24th, 2006, 07:25 AM   #165
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啟德倡建摩天樓 城規委員提反對
10月 24日 星期二 05:10AM

【明報專訊】規劃署昨日就啟德(相關新聞 - 網站)發展大綱圖諮詢城規會,對於政府有意放寬高度限制,在跑道末端興建高200米即約60多層高的酒店地標,頂層並可供遊客俯瞰維港景色的建議,部分城規會委員提出反對。他們認為,在維港邊建「頂心杉」,是一個壞的先例。委員又促請政府盡快興建連接觀塘的大橋,促進啟德經濟發展。

曾主持啟德公眾諮詢論壇的城規會委員黃澤恩指出,公眾只希望在跑道末端興建觀光塔,不是以酒店形式興建。他說,酒店佔地6公頃,約容許發展高度由現時的100米倍增至200米,建築物會變成龐然大物,不單不配合觀塘海濱區發展,更可能會為海濱區的發展開了一個壞先例。

指不建大橋 啟德成孤島

黃澤恩批評,政府把單軌火車和觀塘大橋的興建時間表綑綁並不合理,因郵輪碼頭於6年後建成,如單靠乘客到啟德消費,不足以支持啟德發展。他認為應先建觀塘大橋,方便當地居民出入,而啟德亦能為居民提供就業機會。

身兼港大地理系副教授的委員吳祖南認為,規劃署應在分區計劃大綱圖上列明觀光塔高度可達200米,酒店若要放寬高度限制,須再向城規會申請,「否則香港可能會出現另一座頂心杉」。他又擔心,若不盡快興建觀塘大橋,啟德可能會成為尖東商場十室九空的翻版,變成孤島。

規劃署將於下月把分區計劃大綱圖刊憲,諮詢公眾,啟德發展的工程最快可於08年動工。
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Old October 24th, 2006, 02:38 PM   #166
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From news.gov.hk:
Kai Tak cruise terminal set for 2012
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Old October 24th, 2006, 04:00 PM   #167
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A little bit boredom when hearing Kai Tak's news!

I wonder if it is our HK style to talk rather than action!
Shame on the current Donald Tsang gov't!
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Old October 24th, 2006, 04:20 PM   #168
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I'd rather they take their time to discuss and consult thoroughly rather than put out a plan and force it down the public's throat like they did in West Kowloon. The iterative exercise is crucial to properly put this huge plot of land into use.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 12:46 AM   #169
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50-year deal planned for cruise ship terminal
Hong Kong Standard
Wednesday, October 25, 2006

The successful bidder for the two-berth cruise terminal at the old Kai Tak airport site will have the right to operate the terminal and its supporting facilities for 50 years, at a total cost of HK$2.4 billion.

The Economic Development and Labour Bureau Tuesday announced its decision to surrender the 7.6-hectare site to the private sector, saying it would be better suited to developing a competitive, world-class terminal in a short period of time.

If all goes well, the successful bidder could be reaping between HK$1.2 billion and HK$2.4 billion a year by 2020, the bureau estimated. The new terminal could also help create up to 10,900 new jobs by the same year.

Citing time pressure, bureau secretary Stephen Ip Shu-kwan said the government will invite tenders for the site in the fourth quarter of 2007, with the aim of awarding the tender in the first quarter of 2008. The successful bidder is then expected to complete construction on at least one of the two 400-meter-long cruise berths by 2012.

The berths must be able to accommodate "mega" vessels weighing up to 100,000 tons - a limit that will still rule out many of the industry's newer cruise ships.

A third cruise berth, while also in the government plans, will undergo a separate tender exercise sometime "further down the road."

"All along, the tourism sector has expressed concern about the provision of cruise facilities in Hong Kong. We have been approached by some of the largest cruise companies in the world," Ip said during a press conference Tuesday. "The sooner the first berth is built, the better. If it can be done before 2012, that is even better."

The bidder will be limited to 50,000 square meters of gross floor area for the development of the terminal and any accompanying retail facilities, which can be built in phases. The bidder must also build requisite ticketing, security, customs and baggage facilities.

The bureau estimates site formation will cost HK$1.3 billion and berth construction about HK$300 million.

Tenderers will be judged on financial capability, past experience in operating cruise terminals, and estimated time of completion. Six proposals submitted last year by various developers to build a temporary cruise terminal were rejected because technical complications rendered their timetable uncertain, Ip said.

When asked about the fate of the terminal after the conclusion of the 50-year contract, bureau permanent secretary Eva Cheng Yu-wah replied the government would reclaim the site.

However, she declined to comment on the existing cruise facilities at Tsim Sha Tsui's Ocean Terminal, operated by Wharf. The contract for that terminal is due to expire in 2012.

She emphasized that, since the government will not invest in the Kai Tak terminal, officials have no plans to monitor or restrict the operator.

But Ip's comments met with concern from lawmakers who originally supported the idea of the terminal at Kai Tak.

Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong legislator Choy So-yuk said she felt 50 years was too long and she had expected the contract to be closer to 20 years.

"We don't know what the company is going to do with the terminal. What happens if the company performs poorly?

"Or, if the terminal needs to be refurbished, do we then need to obtain the permission of the company?" she asked.

The proposed terminal at Kai Tak has been a source of controversy in recent months as some sectors of the community continue to rally for the expansion of Ocean Terminal instead.

Officials have defended their choice, however, claiming Kai Tak is the only site in Kowloon with waters deep enough to accommodate up to three berths.

Even so, with waters reaching only 10 meters deep, the site will still require dredging to ensure large vessels can anchor.

Commissioner for Tourism Au King-chi said Tuesday cruise passenger numbers worldwide have skyrocketed more than 40 percent in the past four years, to more than 14 million last year.

With more terminals also planned for Singapore and Shanghai, she said Hong Kong must act quickly to capitalize on the growing trend.

As such, the government will launch a pre-tender consultation with the industry before the end of the year, in tandem with the gazetting of the Kai Tak outline zoning plan by the Town Planning Board.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 06:06 PM   #170
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Kai Tak a diamond for developers: lawmaker
25 October 2006
South China Morning Post

The government's proposal to turn the former Kai Tak airport into a commercial, tourism and residential complex has been criticised as a vehicle for "exchanging development rights for political favours".

"You are cutting up a perfect diamond into several pieces," legislator Albert Chan Wai-yip told housing minister Michael Suen Ming-yeung in the Legislative Council yesterday.

"You have distorted the original idea of a Kai Tak development."

Fellow independent lawmaker Kwok Ka-ki said he was concerned the project would benefit private developers at the expense of the public.

Mr Suen denied he was paying lip service to the environment and pointed out that one-third of the entire development would be devoted to publicly accessible landscaped and green park areas.

All three main political parties - the Liberal Party, the Democratic Party and the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong - welcomed the government's latest revised plan.

The design includes a 200-metre, 50-storey hotel near the southern end of the runway, a heliport, a cruise ship terminal with at least two berths and a bridge connecting the area to neighbouring Kwun Tong district.

The other end of the runway will be dominated by a multi-purpose stadium and low-density commercial and residential developments. A monorail may serve the area.

DAB lawmaker Chan Kam-lam said an observation tower or deck should be built near the hotel.

The current plan assumes no reclamation, although a third cruise ship berth would probably require additional dredging.

Deputy Director of Planning Ophelia Wong Yuen-sheung said it would be best to build the first two cruise ship berths at the southern end of the runway because the sea was deeper there.
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Old October 31st, 2006, 07:23 PM   #171
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Kai Tak is back.
The Hong Kong government has chosen the old airport site for a new cruise terminal
26 October 2006
Lloyd's List

THE site of the once famous Kai Tak airport in Hong Kong has been chosen by the territory’s government as the new flagship cruise terminal facility.

The government has its sights on a 2012 opening of the first phase as an expected cost of HK$2.4bn ($307.7m).

Hong Kong’s secretary for economic development and Labour, Stephen Ip, told a press conference that the government would develop the new cruise terminal through an open tender.

“The successful bidder will, at his own cost, form the site as well as design, build and operate the berthing and supporting facilities.

“This will include reconstruction of the existing seawall and development of two alongside berths which can meet the need of mega cruise vessels up to a displacement of 100,00 tonnes.”

The plan is that a new cruise terminal will be developed on a site of 7.6 ha earmarked at the southern end of the old runway. Following completion of the first berth the government will offer land adjacent to the cruise terminal to the market for development of tourism-related facilities, such as hotels.

“Depending on the implementation programme of the successful bidder, the first berth at Kai Tak is expected to be completed in 2012,” he said.

The successful bidder will also be required to build and operate the second berth, with the option of a third berth at a later date.

“The successful bidder will have the right to develop commercial, office and retail facilities up to a total gross floor area of 50,000 sq m in the cruise terminal building. It will have the flexibility to develop these facilities in phases but within a fixed period,” Mr Ip said.

The government intends to invite tender after the approval of the Outline Zone plan for Kai Tak in the second half of 2007. “We look forward to awarding the tender in the first quarter of 2008,” Mr Ip said.

“The new terminal facilities will become an important tourism infrastructure for Hong Kong. It will help diversify our tourism products, enhancing our attractiveness to tourists from different segments, including the high-end market.”

The government said according to market consultancy studies, with the availability of new cruise terminal facilities and appropriate marketing strategies, the economic benefits are estimated at HK$1.4bn- HK$2.2bn a year and offer employment to as many 10,900 workers.

The decision, which came on Tuesday, was not unexpected. There was a widely held view that the government had always intended to develop the new cruise terminal at Kai Tak as the only site within Victoria Harbour with the capability to provide two or more alongside berths without reclamation. This did lead some to wonder why it wasted time with an “expression of interest exercise” which sought alternative site ideas at the end of last year.

Kai Tak, once famous for the challenging descent required by aircraft to land in the territory, closed in 1998.
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Old November 20th, 2006, 12:37 PM   #172
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Tender plan for Kai Tak under fire
9 November 2006
Hong Kong Standard

The government's proposal to grant a 50-year contract for the new cruise terminal at Kai Tak encountered its first stumbling block Wednesday when an advisory body criticized officials for jeopardizing public interest by giving ``free rein'' to the successful bidder.

Members of the Harbour-front Enhancement Committee questioned the administration's logic behind granting unchecked ``flexibility'' to the developer of the 7.6-hectare site, pointing out the contract's long duration, coupled with a lack of conditions or supervision, could result in yet another mega-commercial complex.

``How will you ensure that the bidder exercises sustainable development? How will you ensure that quality of the site is on par with a waterfront promenade fit for public use, and not just cruise passengers?'' asked the Conservancy Association's Alvin Kwok Ngai- kuen. ``We need to know you will set criteria and incorporate planning principles into the contract.''

The government has recently been eager to accelerate the HK$2.4 billion project in light of the rapidly growing cruise market, citing similar structures going up in Shanghai and Singapore. Officials have set a 2012 deadline for the first of the three cruise berths.

But Kwok's concerns Wednesday were echoed by several other members who feared rushing the project would compromise one of the last pieces of prime waterfront land.

Institute of Architects vice president Vincent Ng Wing-shun wanted to know how the government came to the decision to allow the developer a gross floor area of 50,000 square meters for the terminal and accompanying retail facilities. ``Will it be just hotels and malls, or will you require the bidder to submit a proposal? Our concern is that you don't seem to have a concept plan at this stage, and that town planning concepts won't be incorporated into the planning,'' he said.

Tourism Commission officials said the proposed gross floor area was decided after consultation with the cruise industry and consultants on what was ``necessary'' in terms of space.

Commercial facilities at similar sites like the existing Ocean Terminal and China Ferry Terminal measure about 40,000 sqm, the officials added.

While admitting she envisioned much of the site would be used to develop shopping facilities, offices and hotels, Commissioner for Tourism Au King-chi reassured the resulting development will be one that adds ``vibrancy'' and ``attracts people.'' A pre- tender consultation with ``all stakeholders,'' set to begin early next year, will determine what conditions to include in the tender document, she said.

As for the remainder of the 328-hectare site, members said they were concerned it would remain incomplete in the government's rush to finish building the first cruise terminal berth.

The Real Estate Developers Association of Hong Kong, meanwhile, has expressed objections to the location.

In a submission to the Legislative Council's planning, lands and works panel, the association said the economic case for a cruise terminal is not proven. ``We have serious reservations on Kai Tak as the most suitable location for a cruise terminal as it is remote and distant from other tourism nodes.''

The association also said its preference is to locate the cruise terminal at either West Kowloon or Hung Hom using existing seawall facilities or to focus on upgrading existing facilities at Ocean Terminal, Tsim Sha Tsui.

The government expects to invite tenders for the terminal by the fourth quarter of next year, with the aim of awarding the tender in early 2008.
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Old November 20th, 2006, 05:58 PM   #173
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What's that mound on the site?
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Old November 21st, 2006, 01:10 AM   #174
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What's that mound on the site?

not sure
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Old November 22nd, 2006, 09:23 AM   #175
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Oh , i know the airport
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Old November 22nd, 2006, 09:31 AM   #176
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Kaitak is the idea location for a cruise terminal while Ocean Terminal can be a substitute.

Another thing, there were plans before for land reclamation between the runways, just wondering what happened to that.
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Old November 22nd, 2006, 04:12 PM   #177
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Originally Posted by WANCH View Post
Kaitak is the idea location for a cruise terminal while Ocean Terminal can be a substitute.

Another thing, there were plans before for land reclamation between the runways, just wondering what happened to that.
A much better location for a new cruise terminal was floated in West Kowloon, but due to the depth of the water, serious dredging would need to take place if the terminal was built in the cultural district.
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Old November 22nd, 2006, 07:57 PM   #178
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I really think they should reclaim the sea in between the runway and ... is it Hung Hom? Then create an area of low-rise with vast spaces of open landscaped park. Also have the terminal at the end, with a road at the end so there's no traffic going along the main runway.
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Old November 23rd, 2006, 11:45 AM   #179
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I really think they should reclaim the sea in between the runway and ... is it Hung Hom? Then create an area of low-rise with vast spaces of open landscaped park. Also have the terminal at the end, with a road at the end so there's no traffic going along the main runway.
There won't be reclamation to the west of the runway. That's a huge bay leading to Hung Hom and it is too big to fill in. Kai Tak actually is a fairly green redevelopment plan. The first plans that came out advocated a pollution-free city whereby roads are buried underground and parks dominate the landscape.
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Old November 24th, 2006, 12:29 AM   #180
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i know a lot of people don't want any reclaimation on either side of the runway. i agree with not to fill the gap west of the runway, but east of it (between the runway and kwun tong) should be reconsidered. there was an article in the newspaper a few days ago about the issue of trapping polluted water inside the gap between the runway and kuwn tong, and making the area smells bad. the planning development is now considering filling that gap to eliminate further pollution problem there. The article sais an EIS is going to be performed to determine the need of any reclaimation or what other ways can solve the problem.
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