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Old March 5th, 2006, 11:08 AM   #61
hgsbck
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Thanks for introducing me to SSC,

Saw the rendering for the new Telus HQ building in Citizen...should be a nice addition to that corner of downtown, a little short at 8 floors but makes up with its design. Thats really disapointing though that a deal couldn't be reached for the Congress Centre(though its been going on for so long), unless they do salvage the proposal and actually build it.

About 150 Elgin, here's a rendering of the project:
The tower would be mixed usage with a commercial plaza on ground floor.
From: http://www.chamberfest.com/english/c...factsheet.html


Last edited by hgsbck; March 28th, 2006 at 12:37 AM.
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Old March 21st, 2006, 11:38 PM   #62
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From: http://www.ottawabusinessjournal.com...8372366068.php
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New fresh food store opening in Bayshore mall
By Kristin Harold, Ottawa Business Journal Staff
Tue, Mar 21, 2006 9:00 AM EST

Savory's Fine Foods plans to open its first Ottawa location in the Bayshore Shopping Centre in a few months.

The deal includes the creation of 85 new jobs to staff the almost 17,000 square foot retail space, which was vacated last December by Market Fresh.

"We're looking at opening by mid-May or early June because we're just finishing up on the design work," says Savory's Fine Foods co-founder Paul Traversy. "We chose this location because it attracts a high-end customer and it's a very busy mall."

He says the company had originally considered opening a store in the Bayshore area, but the established presence of Market Fresh had discouraged them. However, when Market Fresh made a sudden exit, Savory's Fine Foods was quick to reconsider the location.

"Their departure represented a real opportunity for us while also tilting the scales back in favour of locating in Bayshore," adds Mr. Traversy. "We plan to provide something that is currently lacking in the Ottawa market, while we will emphasize fresh, flavourful produce and traditional grocery lines."

He says the store will also stock unique specialty products, including gourmet take-home meals, hand-made chocolates, fresh baked breads and a wide range of imported European items.

Mr. Traversy says the company has received a lot of support from Mayor Bob Chiarelli and Bay Ward councillor Alex Cullen, as well as from Bayshore officials.

"We are extremely pleased to have Savory's Fine Foods onboard as a tenant," says Charles Champagne, Bayshore Shopping Centre geneal manager. "Their unique retailing concepts are a great fit for us, their presence at Bayshore reaffirms our commitment to provide shoppers with the very best retail experience possible and Savory's Fine Foods will enrich the quality and breadth of our retail mix."

Mr. Traversy says the company is currently looking at three other locations in the Ottawa area. He has more than 25 years of direct retail food management experience and has been involved in the opening of 17 independently-owned food stores in Ontario and Quebec.
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Old March 24th, 2006, 11:52 PM   #63
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From: http://www.canada.com:80/ottawacitiz...4-077ff1c4b13d
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NCC plan aims to improve public image
Agency says it's more open, but figures show fewer people are attending its annual meetings

Mohammed Adam, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Wednesday, March 22, 2006
The National Capital Commission has embarked on a five-year plan to reduce the number of people who think it is secretive and unaccountable, and improve its image, documents obtained by the Citizen show.
Battered over the years for being self-absorbed and out of touch, the NCC launched the plan in 2003, focusing particularly on increasing public consultation and participation in major planning issues. But three years on, access-to-information documents show that the number of people taking part in the agency's showpiece annual public meetings was down 50 per cent. The number of interest groups participating in meetings also declined.
"The NCC talks about how it has become more open, but openness isn't just calling a meeting and inviting people to come. What people want is open board meetings, not stage-managed, once-a-year meetings with the chair," said Ken Rubin, an Ottawa researcher who obtained the documents for the Citizen.
"After three years, the reality is that the numbers are going down, and going down considerably. If it is continually going down, then the plan isn't working. The devices and methods they've chosen for public consultations aren't respected. People want real participation in board meetings."
Bill Royds, co-chairman of the Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital, says that while NCC staff consult and listen more, the corporate culture remains secretive. "The staff at the NCC have improved, but the problem is the governance. The NCC as a corporation is still a closed shop. They don't want to open their meetings to the public."
The NCC launched it strategy in 2003 after consultant Glen Shortliffe urged it to be more open and transparent by holding part of its board meetings in public and giving residents more say. The goal was to increase the number of people with direct access to the NCC and participate in public consultations up to 45 per cent in 2007-08, from 25 per cent in 2003-04. Over that five-year period, the NCC also hoped to boost positive perception of its public participation policies to 41 per cent, from 28 per cent.
But participation in the annual general meetings went from 250 people in 2001, to 100 in 2002 and 80 in 2003. In 2004 and 2005, the number fell to 40. The number of "interest groups" meetings with the NCC went from 35 in 2002 to 15 in 2003. The number went up to 20 in 2004 and fell to 13 last year.
Guy Laflamme, the NCC's vice-president of communications, marketing and external relations, said the participants in public meetings fell for good reason. He said the NCC provided other avenues for people to be heard, so many didn't feel the need to attend.
"They are not coming because we are offering more frequent opportunities for people to make comments through public consultation and our website," he said.
He said between 2001 and last year, the NCC held more than 65 public meetings. As well, NCC officials went out on 71 occasions to speak to associations and interest groups.
Despite public perception that the NCC is secretive and unaccountable, the agency has found no such evidence in surveys, he said. In one survey, only 30 out of 600 respondents said the NCC was secretive or unaccountable.
Mr. Laflamme said the NCC is working hard to improve public participation and consultation. Unlike other departments, he said, the NCC doesn't spend taxpayers' money on image consultants. "When we say we want to improve our image, it is to help people have a better knowledge of who we are and what we do. It is to explain what we are doing and get better recognition of what we are doing."
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Old March 24th, 2006, 11:55 PM   #64
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From: http://www.canada.com:80/ottawacitiz...2-236c96e89d46
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Quebec to turn Gatineau 'treasure' into wildlife refuge
24-square-km area of Ottawa River wetland visited by 300 species of birds

Dave Rogers, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Friday, March 24, 2006
The Quebec government plans to create that province's largest urban wildlife refuge on Ottawa's doorstep.
Gatineau council got its first look this week at the plan for the refuge to go along the Ottawa River, between McLaurin Bay, south of Gatineau Airport, and Thurso.
The 24-square-kilometre refuge, between Highway 148 and the river, is visited by more than 300 bird species and includes what naturalists regard as some of the most significant wetlands along the Ottawa River. The province owns about 70 per cent of the land, but some property is owned by the municipality, a few private owners and the wetland conservation group, Ducks Unlimited.
The refuge will include Chief Island and Horseshoe Island south of Plaisance National Park. Most of the refuge is within Gatineau's city limits, with about five per cent is in the Municipality of Lochaber West.
Jean Provost, a biologist with the Quebec Ministry of Natural Resources and Wildlife, said the province could build trails through the refuge and could eventually provide canoe rentals and wildlife tours. He said the province wants to have the City of Gatineau as a partner in the project, but added the municipality won't have to spend money on the refuge.
"We want to inform Gatineau councillors that they have a treasury on their hands," Mr. Provost said. "A lot of Quebec municipalities would like to have this kind of property within their borders.
"We have been buying land in that area since 1978. It is a real plus for tourism because people can be in a natural environment 10 minutes from downtown Gatineau."
Mr. Provost said the province has asked the city to provide some land for the refuge, but the project won't cost the city anything unless it wants to help develop the refuge.
Gatineau Councillor Richard Cote, chairman of the city's budget committee, said he does not know whether the city will contribute to the wildlife refuge.
The province has spent $3.3 million to acquire the land, which is largely unsuitable for development, while Ducks Unlimited has spent about $1.5 million on dams to control water levels in the marshes. The ministry will ask private owners to sign agreements to respect wildlife, limit the use of ATVs, snowmobiles and motorboats and will restrict hunting to blinds in designated areas.
"During the spring when all the birds are nesting we could stop motorboats in certain areas and we could stop wood-cutting," Mr. Provost said. "Our game wardens will be able to intervene more easily in the refuge than on private lands. Now we have to sue people who cut wood in the area, so it is more complicated than if game wardens were to issue tickets. We will also hire auxiliary game wardens who will be able to arrest people and lay charges."
Naturalist Dan Brunton said the refuge is the largest wetland in the Ottawa Valley, one of the top birdwatching spots in the lower Ottawa Valley and a fish-breeding area.
"The site provides an important public service to us because it helps clean the water that we use and keeps the shore in good condition," Mr. Brunton said.
"If you were to take those marshes away, we would have to build massive retaining walls to keep the shore from washing away because the land is clay and subject to erosion.
"There are real economic and public heath advantages to us to maintain these wetlands. Every time we remove a chunk of protective river marshes, we degrade the quality of the way the river works."
Gatineau council is expected to discuss the proposed wildlife refuge in April.
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Old March 24th, 2006, 11:57 PM   #65
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From: http://www.canada.com:80/components/...d-86fe10b0eea5
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Friday » March 24 » 2006

Candidates agree: Light-rail must proceed
Vote held March 30 to replace John Baird

Mohammed Adam
The Ottawa Citizen

Friday, March 24, 2006

While most Ottawa residents are probably happy to put the January federal election behind them, voters in Nepean-Carleton find themselves duty-bound to rekindle an interest in politics for next week's provincial byelection.

For the past three weeks, party candidates have trudged across the riding, trying to persuade the electorate to vote for them March 30. Now, with less than a week to go, the search for votes has become intense. Yesterday, the four main candidates met the Citizen editorial board to lay out their visions and platforms, and explain why anyone should care.

Despite differences on taxes, health care and provincial budget priorities, the candidates -- Conservative Lisa MacLeod, Liberal Brian Ford, New Democrat Laurel Gibbons and Peter Tretter of the Green party -- expressed firm support for light-rail, a major issue in the riding. They agreed the north-south line will not make much sense if it doesn't go to the heart of Barrhaven, even though no one explained where the extra $30 million needed for the extension would come from.

As well, the candidates said the estimated $1.5 billion east-west link should be built and they want federal and provincial governments to contribute. All the candidates said that if elected, they would lobby for provincial funding.

"The east-west project should be a priority. It is where most of our clogging occurs. And if we are going to do north-south, it has to go to Barrhaven so people can use it," Ms. Gibbons said.

"I support light-rail because I think it is the way to go," said Mr. Ford. "But my biggest concern is that something like east-west might become a white elephant, the Mirabel of Ottawa, if not planned properly," said Mr. Ford.

Ms. MacLeod said she is happy to leave the decision on what line should be built, and where it should go, to city council and residents, but once they decide, "I'll be happy to help get the money for it."

Nepean-Carleton, which combines large rural and suburban areas, is generally acknowledged to be Tory country. At the federal level, it is where an unknown Alberta transplant named Pierre Poilievre defeated then-Liberal defence minister David Pratt in 2004.

Demographically, it is a highly educated and generally wealthy riding of about 112,000 people. The riding regularly hits the 70- to 75-per-cent turnout mark, very high by recent Canadian standards.

More than half the riding's population is concentrated in Barrhaven and surrounding urban communities such as Longfields and Davidson Heights.

The byelection became necessary after former MPP John Baird switched to federal politics and ran successfully for the Conservatives in Ottawa West-Nepean. Mr. Baird had won three successive elections for the provincial Tories.

Nepean-Carleton is one of three provincial seats vacated by Ontario politicians to run federally. Other byelections will be held at the same time in Toronto Danforth and Whitby-Ajax.

Ms. MacLeod, whom the Conservatives are banking on to retain Nepean-Carleton, is a 31-year-old former executive assistant to Mr. Poilievre. She also served as an assistant to Mr. Baird and Ottawa Councillor Jan Harder.

The mother of a young child, Ms. MacLeod says she has experienced first-hand the problems that plague the health care system, particularly the lack of family doctors that many young families face. "I went through half my pregnancy without a family doctor. I want to bring new ideas and energy to health care issues. I want to do something about it," she said.

In an area where the Conservative brand is very strong, she goes into the byelection with an edge. But the Tories aren't taking anything for granted. A bevy of party heavyweights, including Ontario leader John Tory and federal cabinet ministers, have descended to campaign for Ms. MacLeod. Picking up from where their federal cousins left off, provincial Tories are campaigning on law and order, gun control and health care, hoping to capitalize on the sentiment that carried Stephen Harper and the federal Tories to power.

In the Liberal corner, Mr. Ford, 63, has high name recognition, having served with the Ottawa police for 36 years, seven of them as chief. He is involved in numerous community activities, including membership on the boards of the Youth Services Bureau, Christie Lake Kids and Nepean Housing Corporation. His main issues are health care, education and safe streets. He believes he has a "fighting chance" to win.

"I have done community work all my life and I am here because I have something to offer," he said. "I want to make sure we continue to fund health care and education. And as a former police officer, I want to ensure our streets are safe."

The NDP candidate, 37-year-old Ms. Gibbons, got into politics through her advocacy work on behalf of her autistic son. She is also caring for a family member who has Alzheimer's. A businesswoman who helps design fitness centres in hotels, she contested the riding in the recent federal election.

She is back to fight for "things that matter to families," like public health care. Her own experiences have convinced her that most people would not benefit from private health care. Ms. Gibbons says she wants to help "reinvigorate the public health system," and hopes people will pay attention to the race.

"This race is wide open because there is no incumbent. I am competitive by nature and I play to win," she said.

Mr. Tretter, the 27-year-old Green party candidate, is a part-time Algonquin College student who is running to keep the Green message alive. "It seems like a very Conservative riding, but electing a Green candidate is not that far-fetched. We need Green solutions," he said.

Others seeking the seat include perennial independent John Turmel and Jurgen Vollrath of the Freedom party.
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Old March 24th, 2006, 11:58 PM   #66
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From: http://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/OttawaAn...00913-sun.html
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Thu, March 23, 2006
Light-rail bid plea goes online
City posts details about project, problems

By DAVE PIZER, OTTAWA SUN

Coun. Diane Deans got what she bargained for yesterday after the city posted its massive request for proposals for the $725-million light-rail line on its website.

Deans had been vocal in calling for city staff to release more details about the project.

"Before, it was like fishing around in the dark -- pitch dark. Now, I'm in a corn maze," she joked.

The RFP outlines the performance requirements for the three consortia vying for the contract to design, build and maintain the north-south transit system.

The detailed document also spells out certain challenges associated with the project.


The Strandherd-Earl Armstrong Bridge, which will cross the Rideau -- a Canadian Heritage River and National Historic Site -- is one example. The RFP says the city will pay the winning consortium $8 million to "elevate" the bridge "from a traditional structure" to one that is deemed "approvable" by Parks Canada and the National Capital Commission.

Mayor Bob Chiarelli said the release of the bulk of the RFP will probably answer concerns or issues residents have about the city's largest construction project, but will most likely raise more questions. That's what Chiarelli and the LRT team expect and want.

FEEDBACK WANTED

"We want feedback and dialogue," he said. "We are now getting into the creative part of it."

Coun. Gord Hunter is sending the link out to his constituents today in his e-mail newsletter, but he doubts most will have the time to sift through the enormous document.

The city omitted some information from the public version in order to protect certain intellectual property of the bidding companies.

It's that information that interests Hunter the most.

"How big are the blocks and is it significant information that we should have?" he wondered.

The project's selection panel will choose the winning bid on April 21. The design will be made public between May 23 and June 6, and council will make its final decision on contract amendments on Sept. 13, 2006.

Residents can read the document by visiting www.ottawa-public-lrt.ca.
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Old March 25th, 2006, 12:00 AM   #67
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From: http://www.canada.com:80/ottawacitiz...5-8f62de8d8248
________________________________
Friday, March 24, 2006

Key facts of light-rail kept secret
councillor: Hunter says documents offer little proof of value

Jake Rupert, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Thursday, March 23, 2006
Documents outlining the city's bidding requirements for the north/south commuter rail line contain little to show taxpayers will get value for their money, says one councillor.
City of Ottawa officials overseeing the $725-million project yesterday released about 1,000 pages outlining many of the city's key demands to the three groups of companies bidding for the job. But many of the demands on costs, risk factors, maintenance plans, payments, legal and commercial issues, deposits and technical information were not included.
That prompted Councillor Gord Hunter to question why there wasn't sufficient information to demonstrate the cost and benefit. He said that while the level of detail on some issues -- how many trees will have to be removed to make way for the light-rail line, for example -- shows staff did a lot of homework before asking for bids, there's little to show value for the expense.
"There's not a lot of insight into the costs of this being given, and that's key information I'd like to see, and I think the public would like to see," Mr. Hunter said. "I don't see how any of that would be proprietary to the companies when this information was shared with all three of them. I was looking for all information shared with the three parties.
"I'll be following up with staff. I think they should explain why this information is not being released."
Mr. Hunter wasn't alone in his concerns. One of the project's initial supporters, Barrhaven Councillor Jan Harder, is having doubts. She supported the line when it was to cross Barrhaven and go to the suburb's town centre on Greenbank Road.
But that part of the line was cut to save $30 million. The route is now planned to end at Woodroffe Avenue, on the east side of Ms. Harder's ward.
Ms. Harder said yesterday that if the line isn't extended to Greenbank Road, people won't use the train and it will fail and be a waste of money. She said if the money for the extension isn't found to include it in the bid, she will withdraw her support.
"I'm not into wasting taxpayers' money," she said.
Rejean Chartrand, the city official in charge of the process, said most of the information released yesterday was already known, and that some parts of the city's request for proposal needed to be blanked out for legal reasons and because the municipal freedom of information act doesn't allow for it.
The federal and provincial governments have each agreed to kick in $200 million for the project, and the city has agreed to pick up the rest.
With the city's potential contribution more than $300 million, even though parts of the initial planned route have been axed to keep spending under control, many councillors want more information.
The release of the documents was intended as a response to councillors' concerns, and to reassure the politicians and the public that the project is proceeding as it should.[/quote]
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Old March 25th, 2006, 12:02 AM   #68
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From: http://www.canada.com:80/ottawacitiz...8-dffd9f38d930
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Friday, March 24, 2006
Sparks Street proposal falters
NCC issues new call for plans after Morguard withdraws

Andrew Mayeda, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Thursday, March 23, 2006
The National Capital Commission's plans to revitalize Sparks Street have taken a step backward after developer Morguard Corp. withdrew a proposal to develop a mixed-use residential complex along the downtown pedestrian mall.
This week, the NCC resolicited expressions of interest to develop the site after negotiations with Morguard broke down.
The NCC had hoped the Canlands A complex, which fronts both Sparks and Queen streets just west of Metcalfe Street, would reinvigorate Sparks Street by creating a pool of full-time residents who would shop and eat nearby.
The mall is often nearly deserted on evenings and weekends, and key tenants have departed.
Earlier this year, venerable men's clothier E.R. Fisher announced it would close its Sparks store this spring.
The NCC initially put out an invitation for expressions of interest and qualifications in Oct. 2004. Morguard of Toronto and Claridge Homes of Ottawa responded, but only Morguard submitted a design proposal.
However, Morguard withdrew its proposal around January after negotiations with the NCC fell apart before a lease was signed.
"We came to an impasse and we asked them to either move forward or tell us what they were going to do," said Peter McCourt, NCC director of property development and planning.
He said Morguard withdrew for undisclosed "business reasons."
Morguard's Ottawa office didn't return a request for comment.
"We parted on good terms. I believe they're interested in at least seeing this iteration of the proposal call we have out today," said Mr. McCourt.
The site sits on a prime piece of land at 106-116 Sparks, just 150 metres from Parliament Hill. The NCC owns both the land and the two largely vacant buildings now located there.
The project is expected to include at least 75 residential units, street-level shops, some office space, underground public parking and possibly a boutique hotel. The successful developer will be offered a 66-year lease on the land.
Mr. McCourt called the Morguard withdrawal a "bump in the road," and admitted that the NCC's conditions for the site "aren't everybody's cup of tea." On top of including a residential component, the developer is required to preserve and restore a 19th-century heritage building facing Sparks.
"This isn't an easy thing to do," said Mr. McCourt. At one point, the project was expected to break ground in mid-2006.
But he's confident the project will go ahead. He said a number of developers have already expressed informal interest in the project, and he added that Morguard and Claridge could still re-submit expressions of interest.
"We believe this is the proper thing to do. Putting residential units down there will hopefully create enough traction so that other people will start doing it. It's a way to pump some life into the mall beyond five o'clock."
It's not the first time that the NCC has proceeded deliberately on a project in the area. In 1990, the agency pulled its Canlands B site off the market after it was not satisfied with a design proposal.
The NCC eventually struck a deal with Morguard and a minority partner to develop the site, located at 131 Queen St. The complex, which is under construction, will include mostly office space but also street-level shops and some residential units facing Sparks.
Mr. McCourt said construction should be "substantially completed" by August. The federal government's department of Public Works and Government Services all the office space, he said.
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Old March 25th, 2006, 12:03 AM   #69
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From: http://www.ottawabusinessjournal.com...7687920536.php
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NCC announces latest development
By Ottawa Business Journal Staff
Wed, Mar 22, 2006 3:00 PM EST

The National Capital Commission is inviting proposals from potential developers to build a mixed-use complex on Sparks Street.

The massive redevelopment project, located just 150 metres from Parliament Hill, will include a minimum of 75 residential units, street-level retail businesses, some office space, as well as a possible hotel. According to the National Capital Commisison, the successful firm will be offered a 66-year lease on NCC-owned land.

The site occupies 106 to 116 Sparks St., currently housing two largely vacant buildings both owned by the NCC.

The 19th-century building at 108-116 Sparks includes the former site of the historic Centre Theatre. As part of any development proposal, its façade and the front three metres of the building must be preserved and restored in its current location.

According to the NCC, developers will be compelled to respect and complement the historic streetscape and buildings of Sparks Street, while strengthening its role as a pedestrian mall.

The proposed development compliments another heritage-value complex currently being built at another NCC-owned property, 131 Queen Street.
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Old March 25th, 2006, 01:07 AM   #70
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That new Telus Tower sure looks nice.

Might be moving back to my hometown (ok, North Gower but its south Ottawa) for teachers college at UOttawa. If I don't go there its teachers college in Victoria or down in Melbourne. Be nice to spend a year back home as I haven't lived there since 1988 - its been a long time!
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Old March 25th, 2006, 08:28 PM   #71
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I've heard it's pretty competitive for U of O's Teacher's College, but it's something I've thought about too. Good luck!
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Old March 26th, 2006, 11:33 AM   #72
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From: http://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/OttawaAn...05694-sun.html
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Sun, March 26, 2006
Whole new train of thought
Universities eye light-rail projects

By LAURA CZEKAJ, OTTAWA SUN


The city's plans to expand the north-south light-rail transit system could lead to multimillion-dollar capital projects at both local universities.

Discussions with Carleton and the University of Ottawa regarding the role they would play if the proposed expansions are approved are ongoing, said Rejean Chartrand, the city's director of economic development and strategic projects.

City officials are meeting this week to weigh bids from three companies vying for the $725-million project.

Carleton University is considering building a 200,000-sq.-ft. structure that would straddle the train station at an estimated cost of $60 million or more.

Last year, council directed staff to extend the transit plan from the Rideau Centre across Waller St. onto the University of Ottawa campus. The proposed train station site is currently a parking lot south of Stewart St.


"Effectively, we are trying to iron out the business terms and the conditions upon which this could happen," said Chartrand. "Both universities are totally thrilled and very co-operative in trying to make this happen. It's really part of their vision as well, and in fact connecting the two universities together creates a stronger vision for both the city and the universities."

Carleton president David Atkinson said the next stage is to create construction plans for the part of campus that runs parallel to the train tracks.

"The city came to us and asked us whether we would incorporate a train station into any new building that we would construct on campus," he said. "This would allow us basically to build over the tracks so that the O-Train would go right into the building."

The proposed building would provide room for expanded graduate programs and enable the university to pursue funding through a provincial government investment initiative. The university is also asking the city for money to build the station, which is expected to cost more than $1 million.

Claudio Brun del Re, the U of O's assistant director of planning and programming, said there is still a lot of technical and infrastructure issues to be dealt with. The university is also considering whether it would need to build a structure on the site as part of the project.
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Old March 27th, 2006, 12:44 AM   #73
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Originally Posted by samsonyuen
I've heard it's pretty competitive for U of O's Teacher's College, but it's something I've thought about too. Good luck!
Thanks. I'm still waiting to hear but its better to wait than get an early no. The waiting game is driving me a little mad as I'm a bit of a plan freak. I hate not knowing what city I'll be in come September! lol As for my application my marks are solid but Ottawa takes a look at the big picture, so hopeflully my 14 years of travelling and living overseas counted for something. I just wish I had more voluneer experience under my belt. I was always either moving every six months, working two jobs, going to school full time - or more often than not all of the above together! If only I didn't require sleep! haha This past year I have been a EA at a Kitchener public school teaching grade 2 & 4. I just hope its not a case of too little, too late for my application.

The UOttawa program is excellent because you get classroom experience pretty much starting week 1; its more practical compared with other universities which concenrate on theory and only offer block teaching placements later on. Another quality I love about Ottawa is the campus itself - right downtown near the Rideau Centre and close to everything. I'm in my 30's and I still refuse to have a car - which is a challenge in KW. Luckily Ottawa is pretty pedestrian friendly and OC Transpo is excellent.

Samsonyuen - I appreciate all you updates on transit and everything else Ottawa related. Quick question: Does OC Transpo offer much of a discount to uni students in the way of monthy or annual passes? I find Ontario so expensive for transit compared to BC with its $20 or $40 a year UniPasses. UW stuck down such a plan saying it was unfair to motorist. In BC they tend to side with non motorist. urgh

Last edited by Tri-City Guy; March 27th, 2006 at 12:50 AM.
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Old March 28th, 2006, 12:17 AM   #74
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When I went there (up until April 2004), they were talking about bumping up tuition to cover the cost of a bus pass. I'm not sure if they've done that now. I was lucky to always live in Sandy Hill and work in Centretown, so had little use for a bus pass. I believe they do have student rates for the monthly pass though, but I'm not 100% sure.

I was just checking out the uOttawa site, and there seems to be a pilot program for a 15% deduction of bus passes: http://www.uottawa.ca/services/prote...tationeng.html. For some reason, the OC Transpo site isn't working (or the City of Ottawa either)...
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Old March 28th, 2006, 11:34 PM   #75
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From: http://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/OttawaAn...08493-sun.html
_____________________________________
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Tue, March 28, 2006
That '70s plan still working
Praise for Centretown master plan on 30th birthday

By DAPHNE BLOUIN CARBONNEAU, OTTAWA SUN


COMMUNITY ACTIVISTS in Centretown yesterday evaluated and celebrated a 30-year-old initiative they say saved the neighbourhood -- but they aren't claiming victory just yet.

Thirty years ago, plans were put before city council to replace the Pretoria Bridge with connector roads that would run through various residential parts of Centretown.

The community reacted by forming the Centretown Citizens' Planning Committee which, along with city-appointed architect and planner John Leaning, developed the Centretown Plan.

The citizen-led initiative, which was respected by subsequent city plans and zoning bylaws, has been used as a model in neighbourhoods in Winnipeg and Vancouver.

Yesterday, original and new advocates of the plan evaluated the impact it made on the community.


They will also be holding an open forum at city hall Thursday to further look at the plan's past and future.

The committee, giving the plan a B+, praised the preservation of low-profile residential neighbourhoods and development of quality housing, but said parking, green spaces and the development of Bank St. failed to make the grade.

PROTECTED NEIGHBOURHOODS

The "report card" comes right before the city's release of the Comprehensive Zoning Bylaw, which the group said it will be watching to ensure it respects the integrity of the neighbourhood.

"One of the key goals of the Centretown Plan was to protect the older, low-profile neighbourhoods and it has done a magnificent job in that," said former city councillor and Centretown Citizens' Planning Committee chairman Brian Bourns.

"The number of demolitions of old buildings in Centretown dropped to almost nothing after the plan was adopted. The low-profile neighbourhoods have been improved and upgraded and represent good, sound, solid housing stock."

On the flip side, one place the group wanted to see change and never did was Bank St., where Leaning also conducted a planning study.

"Bank St. never did get its act together. They believed in profitability as opposed to liveability," said Leaning.

The group had originally hoped Bank St. could provide a good mix of residential and commercial development as well as a solution to parking problems by repaving unused areas to build parking lots.

"Nothing really ever transpired, it's every bit the same as it was and that's a big disappointment," said Leaning.

One issue that remained a constant across Centretown was parking, with the committee giving the plan a failing grade in that regard.

"We came up with the concept of paid parking on the street and now the city's made it so expensive that nobody can use it," said Bourns.
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Old March 29th, 2006, 11:23 PM   #76
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From: http://www.ottawabusinessjournal.com...9875323738.php
_______________________
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10-digit dialing arrives in 613 area code
By Ottawa Business Journal Staff
Wed, Mar 29, 2006 10:00 AM EST


©1998 EyeWire, Inc.
The simple act of dialing a telephone number is becoming more complicated, as of today.

Ten-digit local dialing – which requires users to dial the area code before a local number – is now in place within the 613 area code, as well as in the 450, 514 and 819 area codes in Quebec and the 519 area in southwestern Ontario.

As of June 17, users who do not dial the 10 digits will hear a recorded message prompting them to dial the area code followed by the seven-digit local number. Their call will then proceed, but this message could disrupt communications such as fax or Internet transmissions.

The changeover means both consumers and businesses will have to re-program their telephones, dial-up Internet connections and alarm systems, adding the area code to the local number.

For business, here is a partial checklist of things to consider:


pre-programmed cell phone numbers and other wireless devices

fax machines

speed-dialing lists

dial-up Internet connections

telephone options such as call forwarding and call blocking

alarm and security systems

company databases and phone lists
Businesses are also advised to update work documents such as letterhead and business cards, invoices, brochures and catalogues as well as signage, vehicles, directory listings and websites. Adjustments should be made before the June 17 deadline.

Local 10-digit dialing has been introduced to meet the high demand for new telephone numbers. In the National Capital area, it will allow the same seven-digit phone number to be used in both the 613 and 819 area codes.

The telephone companies have set up a special website at www.dial10.ca to provide more information.
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Old April 6th, 2006, 12:15 AM   #77
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From: http://www.ottawabusinessjournal.com...6074232120.php
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Second phase of airport expansion gets the go-ahead
By Ottawa Business Journal Staff
Tue, Apr 4, 2006 11:00 AM EST

The new terminal at Ottawa International Airport, opened less than three years ago, is about to undergo a $95 million expansion.

The Airport Authority has approved the project, which will add 12 new gates and seven passenger bridges. It will be built at the south end of the existing facility.

"Given the increase in passenger volumes, and the addition of several flights and charter airlines since the opening of the new terminal in 2003, we are now at the point where congestion during peak times could become an impediment to further growth" says Airport Authority chair Jim Durrell. "We are ready to address the need for additional space".

The expansion will be financed from the $15 airport improvement fee, paid by passengers. There are no plans to increase the fee to pay for the work.

The authority gave the go-ahead after an 11-month design study. Tenders will soon be let for building construction, apron construction and civil works and demolition," says airport president and CEO Paul Benoit.

"We can now move quickly, but carefully, and look forward to building on the tremendous success that was achieved in Phase I."

Construction is scheduled to begin in August, and the project is expected to finish in 2008.
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Old April 14th, 2006, 01:09 PM   #78
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From: http://www.canada.com:80/ottawacitiz...d9123b&k=44223
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Friday » April 14 » 2006

Tory minister: 'Is the NCC necessary?'
Expected to reveal plans for an overhaul, Cannon instead asks if agency is still relevant

Dave Rogers
The Ottawa Citizen

Friday, April 14, 2006

The Conservatives were supposed to reveal their plans to overhaul the National Capital Commission yesterday, but instead the minister responsible for the agency asked whether it should even continue to exist.

At a speech to the Gatineau Chamber of Commerce, Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Minister Lawrence Cannon announced the first major review of the NCC's mandate in more than 20 years.

"It is simply time to ask fundamental questions about the NCC's role," Mr. Cannon said. "Is the NCC still relevant? Is it even necessary? Is its decision-making process democratic enough?

"Should the NCC continue to prepare plans for and assist the development, conservation and improvement of the National Capital Region or are these responsibilities that could be assumed by the municipal governments?"

Mr. Cannon also questioned whether the NCC should continue to organize, sponsor and promote public events such as Winterlude, or whether these activities should be run by municipalities, the National Arts Centre, the Canada Council or the private sector.

He asked whether the NCC should continue to have the power to expropriate property and whether the cities of Ottawa and Gatineau are able to participate enough in the daily decisions affecting their citizens.

Created in 1959 to oversee federal lands and buildings, the NCC is by far the largest landowner in the region. It has long been criticized by residents as secretive and unaccountable.

The NCC also holds meetings in private, and has been accused of not seeking public input or providing enough information when making major decisions.

When he was promoted to cabinet, Mr. Cannon said that reforming the Crown corporation was one of his priorities.

His speech yesterday followed the government's release on Tuesday of its much-touted accountability act, which included the decision to split the post of chief executive officer from that of the chairman at the NCC.

Treasury Board President John Baird told the Citizen editorial board on Wednesday that the creation of the new job of CEO is the first of many changes coming to the NCC.

Mr. Cannon wouldn't confirm yesterday if the Tories are seriously considering scrapping the agency, and later said it would be counter-productive to declare the NCC not worthwhile.

After Mr. Cannon's speech, NCC chairman Marcel Beaudry issued a press release, saying he welcomes the opportunity to co-operate with Mr. Cannon in a review of the commission's mandate. "I am extremely proud of our accomplishments over the past 14 years and those of our predecessors," Mr. Beaudry said, pointing out that the organization is "highly regarded" in the community.

Mr. Beaudry said a Decima Research poll the NCC commissioned showed that 87 per cent of Ottawa-Gatineau residents rate the commission's performance in organizing special events as excellent or good, and 61 per cent have a positive impression of the NCC.

Gatineau Mayor Marc Bureau said that if the federal government wants to transfer the planning responsibilities of the NCC to his city, he'd need more money.

"I think we have to review the possibility that the municipalities should take on some of the role of the NCC," Mr. Bureau said. "I think that the NCC should be there and some of its meetings should be open to the public.

"The federal government may want to transfer some responsibilities for the NCC to us, but we can't do it if we don't have the money."

Mr. Cannon has given no timetable for his review of the Crown corporation, saying he wants it to be as open as possible so people from the national capital region and across Canada can present their views.

"I would like to hear from the cities about who should run the NCC," Mr. Cannon told reporters after his speech. "I would like to get ideas and opinions from all Canadians and elected officials, both municipal and if need be provincial.

"Once the discussion has taken place we can see how the general population feels about it -- it is their National Capital Commission. In certain circumstances, public meetings are something that is called for and in other circumstances that they not be open. I want to hear from both sides on this issue."

Mr. Cannon also would not speculate about whether someone from the capital region or elsewhere in Canada would serve as chairman when Mr. Beaudry retires in the fall.
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Old April 15th, 2006, 01:22 PM   #79
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From: http://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/OttawaAn...35127-sun.html
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Sat, April 15, 2006
Councillor OK with tech museum's move

By DAPHNE BLOUIN CARBONNEAU, OTTAWA SUN

The trains and rockets at the Museum of Science and Technology might need to blast off -- not across the country or into outer space, but across the Ottawa River.

Transport, Infrastructure and Communities Minister Lawrence Cannon, MP for Pontiac, said this week he would use his influence to have the new museum built in Jacques Cartier Park in Gatineau.

Peter Hume, councillor for the Alta Vista ward where the museum currently sits, says the community would lose "an institution that has been around for decades."

Hume said while his constituents will lose the convenience of a national museum close to home, the museum's future is the priority.

"The current location is cramped, it's leaky and it doesn't allow the museum's full collection to be displayed. It's not particularly well-suited for a national museum of science and technology, particularly because of its size.


"We need a location where the museum can display all its artifacts and fulfill its educational mandate. Whether it's in Ottawa or in Gatineau is not as much of a concern. It's not like they're trying to move it outside the National Capital Region."

Cumberland Coun. Rob Jellett said while the museum needs to move, he hopes it will stay within the city.

"I thought Lebreton Flats was a good location, but what I'd really been hoping for is that it'd come to the east end. We've got lots of land out here and it would be a great draw for people and businesses to come to the east end."
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Old April 16th, 2006, 12:56 AM   #80
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Wonder what they'll do with the lighthouse that sits in front of the existing tech museum.Hopefully they'll also move it with the trains and rockets. As for the NCC, it should remain sticking to what its best at-maintaining and enhancing the capital and its greenspaces, but less urban planning which they seemingly create too much red tape in(Lebreton Flats).

Good to hear that the airport is entering the second phase of expansion.
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