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Old September 7th, 2007, 09:58 AM   #761
ChinaboyUSA
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the color in beijing capital t3 is so cool!
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Old September 7th, 2007, 11:09 AM   #762
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One of the best design of the world's airport design. Congratulations, Beijing!
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Old September 7th, 2007, 06:54 PM   #763
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best new BCIA!! cheers!!
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Old September 7th, 2007, 08:26 PM   #764
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clifster View Post
why do they skip "I"?
They usually skip I and O so they don't get them confused with 1 and 0, which makes sense if the aisles were both numbered AND lettered. But I think in this case (and in most other airports as well) the aisles are only lettered. Beats me on why!
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Old September 8th, 2007, 02:10 AM   #765
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil View Post
They usually skip I and O so they don't get them confused with 1 and 0, which makes sense if the aisles were both numbered AND lettered. But I think in this case (and in most other airports as well) the aisles are only lettered. Beats me on why!
At HKIA, after skipping I in T1, I believe they used it in T2, probably b/c they ran out of letters! (Saw it in a pic somwhere here in SSC)
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Old September 10th, 2007, 07:55 PM   #766
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image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


copyright erussell1984. flicker
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Old September 11th, 2007, 12:05 AM   #767
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Lets hope they leave the roof as it is and not put any words on top of it.

image hosted on flickr
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Old September 11th, 2007, 01:44 AM   #768
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Quote:
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Lets hope they leave the roof as it is and not put any words on top of it.
I would be okay if they put something like a banner for special events, like the upcoming Olympics. It would probably stretch from terminals A-B and would be really cool and inviting when seen from planes. Of course, the banner should not be all connected, first so if it becomes loose the whole thing won't fly off, and second so the skylights can still have a purpose.
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Old September 11th, 2007, 03:08 AM   #769
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zergcerebrates View Post
Lets hope they leave the roof as it is and not put any words on top of it.

image hosted on flickr
If they did want to write on the terminal, they should do it on the glass facade rather than the roof.
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Old September 13th, 2007, 05:58 AM   #770
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an article on T3 on today's news

http://www.guardian.co.uk/china/stor...ticle_continue

Quote:
China lifts the lid on Foster's new airport


· Beijing terminal to open on time and within budget
· Huge pool of labourers helped speed up project


Jonathan Watts in Beijing
Thursday September 13, 2007
The Guardian


It is about twice the size, half the cost and planned and built in almost a third of the time. When Beijing's new airport terminal opens in February, comparisons with Heathrow's Terminal 5 will be inevitable and not entirely flattering to London.
The Chinese capital's new gateway to the skies was given its first international airing today after a three-and-a-half-year sprint to construct the world's biggest airport complex for next year's Olympics.


Article continues

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With 245 acres (99 hectares) of floor space, Terminal 3 of Capital Airport is bigger than all five Heathrow terminals combined. Once it comes into operation, Beijing expects to strengthen its position as a transport hub. With 66 million passengers forecast next year, it will jump from the ninth to third busiest airport.
Airport managers estimate the building costs of the Norman Foster-designed terminal at 21bn yuan (£1.6bn), compared with the £3.5bn price tag of its equivalent designed by Richard Rogers in London.

The main building is reminiscent of Lord Foster's other airports, though even more spectacular. It has the same light and airy glass wall entrance and high ceiling as Stansted and Hong Kong's Chep Lap Kok. The double-skinned aluminium canopy -silver slats under a russet roof - shimmer for half a mile.

Airport authorities reportedly asked Lord Foster to incorporate the bright tones found in the Forbidden City. They are evident in the tapering red pillars and the brown-gold roof shaped like the back of a dragon.

But the darker colours - and cost-cutting that reduced the number of skylights - make parts of the interior gloomier than usual for Lord Foster.

Guides reel off statistics on an epic Chinese scale. The three buildings of Terminal 3 are home to 445 lifts, 1,800 miles of cables and a car park for 7,000 vehicles. There is a road network and a light railway under construction which ends at a terminus shaped like a giant glass turtle. At its peak the workforce numbered 50,000.

The pace of construction is unimaginable in most other countries. Building work started on August 7 2004 and is expected to be finished by the end of this year. The public consultation alone on Heathrow's Terminal 5 took longer.

Why so quick? Jeff Martin, deputy project manager for Siemens, one of the main contractors, said it was simple: "There is so much available labour. If I say we need 500 extra workers tomorrow, then I will get them. In the US, you would have to go through unions and it would take much, much longer."

Mr Martin said construction was on track for a February opening. The buildings are completed and fitting-out the interior is proceeding rapidly. The workforce has been trimmed to 8,000 and trials began this week on the state-of-the-art baggage handling system. Its designers boast that its 20-mile network of conveyor belts can handle 20,000 bags per hour and shift suitcases at a speed of 10 metres per second, more than double the rate at Heathrow.

Another reason for the speed of construction is the power of the authorities to relocate residents. Managers say 10,000 people have been resettled. A promotional video boasts that there have been no appeals over land acquisition, although the Guardian has learned that those who tried to protest could not file official complaints.

One family who lived in Gangshan village say they were cheated into signing a deal for low compensation.

"Whenever I think about it, I feel bitter and full of pain," said the daughter, a teacher who gave only her English name, Cindy. "With the compensation they gave, we can only afford one apartment that I have to share with my parents, my brother and his wife. It is as though we have gone from rich to poor overnight." However, the airport's general manager, Zhang Zhizhong, said the resettlement had been well received.

Even with the mass resettlement and the huge new terminal, Beijing does not believe it has enough capacity. A working group is now searching for a second site.

In numbers


50,000
Number of workers employed at the site during peak construction

445 The number of passenger lifts to be fitted at the new Terminal 3 building

1,800 The number of miles of electric cabling throughout the site

20,000 The number of suitcases and bags that can be processed each hour
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Old September 13th, 2007, 06:04 AM   #771
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Quote:
Even with the mass resettlement and the huge new terminal, Beijing does not believe it has enough capacity. A working group is now searching for a second site.
They are not even contended with one massive terminal?
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Old September 14th, 2007, 04:15 AM   #772
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One Giant Airport

By Richard Spencer, in Beijing
Last Updated: 2:29am BST 13/09/2007



According to its designers, it is built to resemble a Chinese dragon. Its structural plan is a homage to the architectural marvel that is the Forbidden City.

Less kindly, its tapering curves have been compared to a giant thong.


The new multi-billion dollar airport terminal is meant to impress visitors to the 2008 Olympics in Beijing


What no-one doubts is that Beijing's giant new airport, the latest part of the city's Olympic masterplan to be unveiled to the world, is yet another contribution to the record books, and another example of China's world-beating ambition.

Since its first pile was driven into the dry plain north-east of Beijing three years ago, the only view visitors have had of the construction site, teeming with 50,000 workers, was from the air as they came in to land.

From the existing terminals, all that could be seen looming out of the haze that hangs perpetually over the city was a three-mile long, low shape.

Yesterday, it was opened to the cameras for the first time, while its bosses unleashed a flood of statistics.

When it opens in February, it will not just be the largest airport in the world. The new terminal, at 10,600,000 square feet, or 244 acres, or 235 football pitches, will alone be bigger than any other airport, without having to add the current two terminals into the equation.

advertisementIt is larger than Heathrow's four current terminals rolled into one.

Bigger by far than the Pentagon, the world's largest office block by floor space, it is just a few square feet smaller than the Aalsmeer flower auction house in Amsterdam, currently the world's biggest building.

It is preparing for a huge increase in numbers: the current facilities handle more than 48 million passengers a year, already more than double the number five years ago. By 2012, that is projected to be 90 million.

Terminal 2 itself was only opened in 1999 - even then, no-one foresaw the staggering economic growth that China has experienced since it joined the World Trade Organisation in 2001. Earlier this year, aviation authorities announced a cut in the number of flights allowable saying that the sheer numbers were threatening safety standards.

Officials also admit that passenger complaints are high due to an inability to train new staff fast enough.

Designed by Lord Norman Foster, whose airport projects have grown in size from his first, Stansted, through Hong Kong, currently the world's single biggest airport terminal, to Beijing, it has been constructed under the supervision of Arup, the British architectural engineers.

The terminal takes the form of three long, curved buildings, connected by automatic trains.

The steel and glass structures are unashamedly modern. But its three parts, following a straight line and visible from each other, are supposed to remind visitors of the Forbidden City, as are its golden roof and red columns.


A worker walks on the roof of the new terminal


The skylights that flood the interior with natural light stick up from the steel superstructure like scales, making the whole look from the outside like a giant uncoiled dragon. At the front, it nurses a turtle - the station for the new metro line which will rush passengers to the city centre in just 16 minutes.

Of course, such megastructures are easier in a place where government diktat takes the place of consultation.

The Beijing airport authorities yesterday said 10,000 people had seen their homes demolished to make way for the new terminal - a fraction of the 1.5 million people that have been evicted to make way for all the city's new stadia, metro lines, and other Olympic-related development.

Nevertheless, the whole project will be complete in about half the time it took for Heathrow Terminal Five just to win planning approval.

With the world's longest sea bridge, the third-highest building, and biggest metro system already under construction, China's ambitions are not stopping here.

"We are now planning a second airport," said Zhang Zhigong, the general manager. "We expect to start work on that in 2010."

It will be ready in 2015, when Mr Zhang expects even his new dragon to have reached capacity.


Information appearing on telegraph.co.uk is the copyright of Telegraph Media Group Limited and must not be reproduced in any medium without licence. For the full copyright statement see Copyright
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Old September 15th, 2007, 04:57 AM   #773
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Beijing Airport Express

Beijing Capital International Airport Link's ART MK II Vehicles Debut in Changchun





On Sep. 7, the first train, which comprises 4 ART (Advanced Rapid Transit) MK II vehicles, that is to be used for Beijing Capital International Airport Link connecting Dongzhimen Station to the Beijing Capital International Airport using Bombardier's ART technology made its debut in Changchun.

In March 2006, Bombardier received an order from Changchun Railway Vehicles (CRC) as part of a contract awarded to CRC by the Beijing Dongzhimen Airport Express Rail Co. Ltd. for the supply of 40 ART MK II vehicles for the Beijing Capital International Airport Link.

It is known that Bombardier participates in project management and is responsible for vehicle systems engineering and integration, design and manufacture of the bogies as well as the propulsion and braking systems while Changchun Railway Vehicles (CRC) manufactures the 40 ART MK II vehicles.

Once fully operational, the airport link will serve four different stations: Dongzhimen, Sanyuanqiao, Beijing Capital International Airport's Terminal 2 and Terminal 3. Passengers will be able to interchange trains conveniently at the Dongzhimen and Sanyuanqiao Stations, where connections to the 2008 Olympic village will be available.

In addition, a special lounge at the Dongzhimen Station will allow passengers to initiate flight-boarding procedures before arriving at the airport as well.
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Old September 15th, 2007, 01:06 PM   #774
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nice train
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Old September 15th, 2007, 04:32 PM   #775
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Don't know if these particular photos were once posted here. I can't locate them in this thread so many pages.

Anyways test run of automatic people mover.







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Old September 15th, 2007, 11:43 PM   #776
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image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
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Old September 16th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #777
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^ wow thats nice.

Any interior pics? I tried to look for it in that carnoc site but couldnt read Chinese errrr...
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Old September 16th, 2007, 05:30 AM   #778
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I like the airport train, nice long and wide seats. the isle looks a bit too narrow, considering tourists are bigger size.
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Old September 17th, 2007, 12:58 AM   #779
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zergcerebrates View Post
^ wow thats nice.

Any interior pics? I tried to look for it in that carnoc site but couldnt read Chinese errrr...
No. haven't got any interior pics.
Its time for you to learn Chinese
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Old September 17th, 2007, 12:05 PM   #780
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Sep 12

T3 will be completed by the year end, opening Feb 2008.

T3 interior


Outside


Terminal people mover rail
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