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Old April 10th, 2008, 07:28 AM   #2101
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About time. They should have these variable speed signs on all highways in the US and Canada.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 10:19 AM   #2102
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I don't see the point of variable speed signs. It's a freeway and they should just raise all speed limits to 85mph for cars and trucks. Rural freeways should have no speed limit for cars/light trucks and 85mph for heavy trucks.

60mph is way too slow for a freeway in my opinion.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 11:44 AM   #2103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
I don't see the point of variable speed signs. It's a freeway and they should just raise all speed limits to 85mph for cars and trucks. Rural freeways should have no speed limit for cars/light trucks and 85mph for heavy trucks.

60mph is way too slow for a freeway in my opinion.
I agree, these shouldn't be used to control congestion, but should instead be used for weather-related issues/other cautions only. The argument they have is to bring traffic in slower so cars don't pile up quickly. Well if the speed limit was raised, they could get traffic through faster too. I think this is money going to waste. It's a good concept, but a bad execution.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 04:41 PM   #2104
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The faster traffic goes, the faster it enters congestion, the harder it brakes, the bigger the jam......
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Old April 10th, 2008, 07:06 PM   #2105
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By that rationale, we should just sit at home all day,lol.

Anyhow, I don't know if the benefits justify the cost. I would think that the traffic flow would dictate speed limits anyhow, unless they use it in a precautionary means, which would piss me off.

If the road slowed down to 30, I might as well take other roads.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 08:12 PM   #2106
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We use the system in the Netherlands very extensive, and with good results. It's a way to control a traffic jam, and warning upcoming traffic that a traffic jam is ahead, resulting in fewer accidents, which eventually worsen the T-jam.

Sometimes, it's better to have a variable speed limit, what is often see in Germany, is, that in otherwise quiet freeways, which sometimes have heavy traffic, some people still try to drive 160km/h in busy traffic. With variable speed limits, this kind of traffic jam/sluggish traffic encouraging behaviour can be avoided.

The traffic flow is the best when people drive more or less the same speed.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 08:27 PM   #2107
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Will they use a European style for speed limit signs? Would be awesome. On mountain stretches of I-90 they already have variable speed limits, but those are just textual signs saying "Speed limit XX", and they only depend on weather conditions (rain, snow, ice, etc)



I think that slowing down traffic on a motorway when approaching a traffic congestion could be done by displaying this sign , and not by changing the speed limit.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 08:42 PM   #2108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
I don't see the point of variable speed signs. It's a freeway and they should just raise all speed limits to 85mph for cars and trucks. Rural freeways should have no speed limit for cars/light trucks and 85mph for heavy trucks.

60mph is way too slow for a freeway in my opinion.
With gasoline and diesel hitting records daily, I don't see this ever happening.

In fact, I think if these records continue in the future, the opposite will happen, like it did in the seventies. I believe that, if gas ever hits $4 or so, the government will lower speed limits.

I heard something here in my state about a state senator pushing to lower the speed limit back to 55 mph (~90 km/h). Until the late 1990s, this was the speed limit in Connecticut, one of the lowest in the country. The bill died, but I think as gas prices continue to rise, these bills will be more common in the future.

BTW: I noticed that truck drivers here in Connecticut are driving a lot slower than they used to before. Then again...they are trying to conserve cost. Some stations are selling diesel close to $4.40/gal ($1.16/liter) now.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 09:26 PM   #2109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post

I think that slowing down traffic on a motorway when approaching a traffic congestion could be done by displaying this sign , and not by changing the speed limit.
I think seeing a sea of bright red brake lights works well for me. It would be redundant if there was a sign noting congestion ahead. Going into San Antonio on south Interstate 35 there is an electronic sign that flashes "congestion ahead" and it does nothing for you because as you're slowing down seeing that sign flashing you think to yourself "no shit, thanks for the reminder!!!"

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With gasoline and diesel hitting records daily, I don't see this ever happening.

In fact, I think if these records continue in the future, the opposite will happen, like it did in the seventies. I believe that, if gas ever hits $4 or so, the government will lower speed limits.

I heard something here in my state about a state senator pushing to lower the speed limit back to 55 mph (~90 km/h). Until the late 1990s, this was the speed limit in Connecticut, one of the lowest in the country. The bill died, but I think as gas prices continue to rise, these bills will be more common in the future.

BTW: I noticed that truck drivers here in Connecticut are driving a lot slower than they used to before. Then again...they are trying to conserve cost. Some stations are selling diesel close to $4.40/gal ($1.16/liter) now.
I think lower speed limits will be costly for everyone because more people would be pulled over. I find it sad when a state of the art Interstate has the same speed limit as a farm road or a city street. Some freeways in San Antonio have a speed limit of 50mph but who in the hell would drive 50mph on a freeway? As for car efficiency I don't think because a car is driving slower it's more efficient. Cars differ in their speed vs. fuel efficiency.

Even with the way gas prices are these days I still drive over the speed limit when I feel like it. Seeing a 55 speed limit sign out in the desert would do absolutely nothing more than frustrate me. If I want to burn more gas driving faster I'd rather be the judge of that, not the U.S. or state government.
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Old April 10th, 2008, 09:33 PM   #2110
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I would like speed limits to go up too, however, I don't see it happening now of all times.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 01:56 AM   #2111
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I would like speed limits to go up too, however, I don't see it happening now of all times.
Amen, I think we should just follow Germany and have a recommended speed limit.

But then, the U.S. drivers ed program is such a joke I don't think high speeds will be safe for everyone. Get the grannies out of the passing lane first, then we can start talking about raising limits.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 02:56 AM   #2112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
I think seeing a sea of bright red brake lights works well for me. It would be redundant if there was a sign noting congestion ahead. Going into San Antonio on south Interstate 35 there is an electronic sign that flashes "congestion ahead" and it does nothing for you because as you're slowing down seeing that sign flashing you think to yourself "no shit, thanks for the reminder!!!"



I think lower speed limits will be costly for everyone because more people would be pulled over. I find it sad when a state of the art Interstate has the same speed limit as a farm road or a city street. Some freeways in San Antonio have a speed limit of 50mph but who in the hell would drive 50mph on a freeway? As for car efficiency I don't think because a car is driving slower it's more efficient. Cars differ in their speed vs. fuel efficiency.

Even with the way gas prices are these days I still drive over the speed limit when I feel like it. Seeing a 55 speed limit sign out in the desert would do absolutely nothing more than frustrate me. If I want to burn more gas driving faster I'd rather be the judge of that, not the U.S. or state government.

No one is forcing you to go the speed limit. But if you are caught going over it, then you deserve a punishment. Go ahead and be an idiot and burn more fuel, no one is stopping you.

And yes, engines burn more gas at higher speeds, so driving faster increases fuel consumption. That is an incontrovertible fact.

Freeways have more cars using them and thus have greater congestion, meaning vehicles cannot drive at 90 mph all the time on them.

And the signs warning of congestion often are placed in advance of the actual bottleneck to warn motorists so they don't have to slam on their breaks and endanger the flow of traffic.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 02:57 AM   #2113
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"It seems necessary to them (officials)," said driver Steve Massee. "Every year I get property tax increases. Now I know where the money goes."
That guy is a ******* retard. Property taxes don't pay for projects on state and federal highways, fuel taxes do.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 07:25 AM   #2114
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That guy is a ******* retard. Property taxes don't pay for projects on state and federal highways, fuel taxes do.
Haha I didn't notice that in the article. I think I've mentioned this before though. Washington State taxes itself on construction projects. So the gas tax dollars that are used to fund construction projects are actually taxed, and the tax goes to other general funds not related to transportation, like schools, healthcare, police/fire, etc. Some people don't support this (republicans), but the democrats are actually fighting to keep this "double-tax." What a waste of fuel tax...
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Old April 11th, 2008, 07:53 AM   #2115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
I think seeing a sea of bright red brake lights works well for me. It would be redundant if there was a sign noting congestion ahead. Going into San Antonio on south Interstate 35 there is an electronic sign that flashes "congestion ahead" and it does nothing for you because as you're slowing down seeing that sign flashing you think to yourself "no shit, thanks for the reminder!!!"
I can't believe you have never experienced a situation where you bump into an unexpected traffic jam and have to use emergency braking not to slam into a car in front of you. In California it happened quite often. "Sea of red light" may not be enough to warn you that you have to start braking RIGHT NOW, and a lot of rear-end collisions happen because people underestimate the speed difference between them and a traffic jam ahead. In Germany, for instance, those who spot traffic jam early turn on their emergency lights to warn vehicles behind to be prepared to slow down or stop. I do it regularly, but in the USA I have seen others doing it only 3 times in 7 years.

As for the warning sign, like hoosier said, it would be displayed ahead of the congestion and would show an approximate distance to it.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 08:07 AM   #2116
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No one is forcing you to go the speed limit. But if you are caught going over it, then you deserve a punishment. Go ahead and be an idiot and burn more fuel, no one is stopping you.

And yes, engines burn more gas at higher speeds, so driving faster increases fuel consumption. That is an incontrovertible fact.

Freeways have more cars using them and thus have greater congestion, meaning vehicles cannot drive at 90 mph all the time on them.

And the signs warning of congestion often are placed in advance of the actual bottleneck to warn motorists so they don't have to slam on their breaks and endanger the flow of traffic.
We waste lot of gas anyway.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 03:43 PM   #2117
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BTW: I noticed that truck drivers here in Connecticut are driving a lot slower than they used to before. Then again...they are trying to conserve cost. Some stations are selling diesel close to $4.40/gal ($1.16/liter) now.

Netherlands:

Diesel: $ 1.86/liter -> $ 7 gallon
Gas: $ 2.4/liter -> $ 9.1/gallon

You guys still have a long way to go

And nobody in the Netherlands is driving slower or less to compensate for high fuel prices.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 03:44 PM   #2118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 10ROT View Post
BTW: I noticed that truck drivers here in Connecticut are driving a lot slower than they used to before. Then again...they are trying to conserve cost. Some stations are selling diesel close to $4.40/gal ($1.16/liter) now.

Netherlands:

Diesel: $ 1.86/liter -> $ 7 gallon
Gas: $ 2.4/liter -> $ 9.1/gallon

You guys still have a long way to go

And nobody in the Netherlands is driving slower or less to compensate for high fuel prices.
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Old April 11th, 2008, 05:17 PM   #2119
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It's a far cry from 8 years ago when petrol (in the US) was 1/4 of the price as in Holland. Proportionately the increases in the US have been far higher than in Europe.
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Old April 12th, 2008, 02:57 AM   #2120
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LOL. 8 years ago, you could have filled a car for less than $20!

Now, it would cost almost 50 dollars.
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