daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 10th, 2008, 10:37 PM   #2901
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

@Jeroen: I thought the situation improved; I haven't heard of any incident for a few months now. But yes, it is sick. btw, I also saw these fences on a viaduct on the 128, in Massachusetts, near exit 31B
@Chris: maybe the rush hours on that road are very bad
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 11th, 2008, 03:44 AM   #2902
Tom 958
Registered User
 
Tom 958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: near Atlanta
Posts: 786
Likes (Received): 163

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I noticed this freeway in St. Louis, the SR-364, which carries 48.000 vehicles a day, but has an insane 12 lanes! Why the hell is that?
(this picture shows the 10-lane section).
Because... roads can be useful, but sometimes their function is to serve as tokens of political power and cultural subjugation. Not unlike nuclear weapons, actually. This particular road, IIRC, was the subject of long and fierce debate, running, as it did, through a large park. Unusually, the debate was settled by a referendum. The voters of the area decided to extend a middle finger to the environment and its defenders, and the road planners took the opportunity to belabor the point by making the road ridiculously wide. No doubt you also noticed that MO 364 feeds a simple four-loop interchange at I-270-- by building such a huge road feeding such a primitive interchange, the local powers that be may be able to force construction of a really huge interchange, too. And this in a metro area that's barely growing at all, at least in population and economic terms. In consumption of land, well, that's a different matter.

Heh. I'm being cute and way too inflammatory, but I've seen this type of dynamic in action before, and some of our Texan forumers have essentially said that Texas does this as a matter of course.

Last edited by Tom 958; September 11th, 2008 at 04:32 PM. Reason: typo
Tom 958 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 11th, 2008, 09:27 AM   #2903
seawastate
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 46
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by He Named Thor View Post
I thought there was a problem with snowplows tearing them out of the pavement? You almost never see the reflectors in Wisconsin.
In Washington State, many of the roads in higher elevations have reflectors placed in crevices so they aren't scraped off by snowplows. Speaking of reflectors, here are some pics of the different reflectors used in the United States.


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr

Standard raised reflectors. Commonly used in states where snowplows scraping them off are not a problem. Blue denotes a fire hydrants is nearby. Red means wrong way, yellow denotes the median and white is for lane markings.

----

image hosted on flickr

In some states such as California or Washington, botts dots are used to replace paint markings. These non-reflective dots often have reflectors interlaced in between.

----

For roads that see snowplows over them, raised pavement markers do no good as they will be scraped off. There are two alternatives I have seen. One is to place the reflector inside a crevice or scraped out hole where snowplow blades wont touch it. Another is a special reflector where metal "ribs" protect the reflector allowing the snowplow blade to pass over safely.





Sorry if this was a long post but I find reflectors rather interesting!
seawastate no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 11th, 2008, 09:51 AM   #2904
Alex Von Königsberg
Registered User
 
Alex Von Königsberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 11

In California, botts dots are the thing of the past. New highways don't have them, and probably never will. They are in the same category as the dotted guide signs on Californian motorways - still exist but will be replaced with modern reflective paint as they age.
Alex Von Königsberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 11th, 2008, 10:03 AM   #2905
HAWC1506
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Bellevue, WA + Munich, Bavaria
Posts: 1,280
Likes (Received): 28

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Aren't they called "Botts dotts" or something? You see them everywhere in urban California.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
^ Botts' dots aren't reflective, they aren't lights.
Botts dots are neither reflective nor lighted. They are simply colored plastic 'dots' that are aimed at providing a vibration when you run over them. The reflectors are just called plastic reflectors. The British call it cats'-eyes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by He Named Thor View Post
I thought there was a problem with snowplows tearing them out of the pavement? You almost never see the reflectors in Wisconsin.
Yeah snowplows are a problem. After the winter in Washington, I see probably 20% of Bots Dots torn off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
In California, botts dots are the thing of the past. New highways don't have them, and probably never will. They are in the same category as the dotted guide signs on Californian motorways - still exist but will be replaced with modern reflective paint as they age.
Same with Washington. Every new section of freeway is replaced with highly-reflective profiled plastic markings for the white dashed lines. However, in between those white dashed lines, there will be one plastic reflector. The engineer I talked to said that the profiled plastic markings are twice as expensive as Bots Dots, but last more than twice as long and offer more reflection/visibility.
HAWC1506 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 11th, 2008, 05:50 PM   #2906
mgk920
Nonhyphenated-American
 
mgk920's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Appleton, WI USA
Posts: 2,583
Likes (Received): 68

Quote:
Originally Posted by seawastate View Post
For roads that see snowplows over them, raised pavement markers do no good as they will be scraped off. There are two alternatives I have seen. One is to place the reflector inside a crevice or scraped out hole where snowplow blades wont touch it. Another is a special reflector where metal "ribs" protect the reflector allowing the snowplow blade to pass over safely.





Sorry if this was a long post but I find reflectors rather interesting!
WisDOT (Wisconsin) made widespread use of this style of reflectors during the 1990s and into the early 2000s, but stopped when they were found to not hold up under normal traffic. They are now experimenting with special high-reflectivity paint.

I would suspect that the life expectancy of ANY special reflectors is very short, indeed, in any state where tungsten-carbide tire studs are legal (they are *ILLEGAL* here in Wisconsin), too.

Mike
mgk920 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 11th, 2008, 08:31 PM   #2907
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

In Alaska they do this:
[IMG]http://i38.************/18c840.jpg[/IMG]
And you really feel it, I can tell you!
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 11th, 2008, 09:17 PM   #2908
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

Not only Alaska does that. Many states have it.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2008, 12:20 AM   #2909
Dan
Registered User
 
Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Scotland / Ireland
Posts: 1,244
Likes (Received): 3

Any current significant freeway projects of note in the US?

I know one of about 15 mi or so is opening in just a few days in the Salt Lake City metro. Any others?
Dan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2008, 02:40 AM   #2910
pwalker
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Native Seattleite
Posts: 1,438
Likes (Received): 66

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan1113 View Post
Any current significant freeway projects of note in the US?

I know one of about 15 mi or so is opening in just a few days in the Salt Lake City metro. Any others?
You are referring to the Legacy Parkway, north of Salt Lake City. Not sure it can be classified as a freeway, but it will be limited access, 4-lanes total, and a 55-mph speed. (Instead of 65 on I-15).

http://www.udot.utah.gov/legacy/overview_history.php
pwalker no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2008, 03:16 AM   #2911
HAWC1506
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Bellevue, WA + Munich, Bavaria
Posts: 1,280
Likes (Received): 28

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan1113 View Post
Any current significant freeway projects of note in the US?

I know one of about 15 mi or so is opening in just a few days in the Salt Lake City metro. Any others?
Major works are being done to I-405 in Washington. Recently a tunnel was removed to make space for additional lanes. Then about a 15 mile stretch of I-405 will gain additional lanes. Then there is a new bridge also being built to carry the extra lanes, and that is also part of the I-90/I-405 intechange improvement project. Also, there will be a new ramp configuration from I-405 to SR520. A new overpass is also going over I-405 in Bellevue. Recently, a major repaving and HOV direct access ramp project was completed in Kirkland (around milepost 15-20).

Finally, I-405 through Bellevue will be a test project for quieter pavement studies.

An engineer told me that WSDOT is going to have a record-breaking 2009 construction season.

You may be wondering why there are so many projects and this is the reason: (photos by Frasier Crane on the Bellevue Development Thread). This is the City of Bellevue with I-405 in the background.


Last edited by HAWC1506; September 12th, 2008 at 03:32 AM.
HAWC1506 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2008, 10:39 AM   #2912
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

I believe the I-405 near Bellevue is even more congested than the I-5 in downtown Seattle. Well, the 405 has a major lack of capacity.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2008, 07:55 PM   #2913
Alex Von Königsberg
Registered User
 
Alex Von Königsberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 11

From experience, I-5 and I-405 are equally congested during the peak hours. The difference is that due to exits arrangement on I-5 in downtown area, you can accelerate from from 0 to 100 km/h and then run into a stalled traffic 300 metres ahead. It might be quite dangerous. In this sense, I-405 has more predictable traffic jams
Alex Von Königsberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 12th, 2008, 08:17 PM   #2914
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,891
Likes (Received): 18168

House votes $8B relief for highway trust fund
By JIM ABRAMS, Associated Press Writer
Thu Sep 11, 5:07 PM ET

Congress on Thursday sent President Bush an $8 billion rescue package for the federal highway trust fund. The infusion comes as the trust fund, which relies on declining revenues from the federal gas tax, verges on going broke, threatening road and bridge projects in every state.

The House passed the measure on a 376-29 vote Thursday, a day after the Senate overcame objections from conservative senators and passed it on a voice vote. The legislation transfers $8 billion from the Treasury's general fund to the highway fund, ensuring that ongoing construction projects won't be interrupted.

The White House had previously threatened to veto the measure, calling it "both a gimmick and a dangerous precedent that shifts costs form users to taxpayers at large."

But the administration shifted positions after Transportation Secretary Mary Peters last week revealed that the trust fund would run out of money this month, which would delay payments to states for infrastructure projects and threaten the jobs of hundreds of thousands of construction workers.

"We must act," said Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga. "The trust fund is broke, out of money. Our state and local governments, drivers, construction workers and many others suffer when highway projects are delayed." He and others pointed out that in 1998 the government moved $8 billion from the trust fund, then enjoying a large surplus, to the general fund for deficit reduction, and that this measure returned borrowed money.

It has long been anticipated that the 52-year-old trust fund would move into the red next year, a result of the reluctance of Congress to raise the gas tax, unchanged since 1993 despite inflation and soaring construction costs. The federal fuel tax is 18.4 cents a gallon, or 24.3 cents for diesel.

But the fund, which had a $10 billion surplus just three years ago, has had a rapid change in fiscal fortune as drivers, responding to higher gas prices, have curtailed their driving and switched to more fuel-efficient vehicles.

Peters on Wednesday commended the Senate for its swift action to address the immediate crisis but added in a statement that "Congress must eliminate the billions in wasted spending, thousands of unneeded earmarks and hundreds of conflicting and contradictory special interest programs in order to make sure states don't face this situation again."

Stephen E. Sandherr, chief executive director of the Associated General Contractors of America, expressed relief that Congress had finally acted. "We knew this shortfall was coming and we have made this a priority for the last two years," he said. "The money was set to run out, states were going to be left holding the bag and contractors would have been forced to lay people off."

The few opponents of the bill blamed the current crisis on the 6,300 earmarks — lawmakers' pet projects — worth some $24 billion, included in the $286 billion highway bill Congress passed in 2005. That bill expires next year.

"Part of the reason we are having to steal money from the general fund," said Rep. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., is "we just went hog wild in 2005. We've got to stop this earmarking process."

Democrats in turn thanked the White House and Republicans for letting the stalled bill move forward. "I'm glad the Republicans came to their senses — you can't play politics with 300,000 jobs when we're in a recession," said Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calf., chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

The American Road and Transportation Builders Association, using Transportation Department figures, said that without the fix federal highway aid to the states would drop from $35 billion in the fiscal year ending on Sept. 30 to $24 billion in the next fiscal year 2009. It estimated that 379,000 jobs would be lost without congressional action.

According to the estimate, California would lose 32,000 jobs, Texas almost 30,000, New York and Florida 20,000 each and Pennsylvania 19,000.

The House first passed the $8 billion relief bill in July, but Senate Republicans have thwarted several Democratic efforts to move the legislation in the Senate, demanding they first get votes on issues such as the proliferation of earmarks in highway spending bills.

"Much of this bill is not about roads and bridges," said Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C. "It's numerous wasteful earmarks that I'm afraid could end up as part of this $8 billion."

Because highway money is paid out over a number of years, postponement or delay in starting a project can have long-term ramifications. "The urgency of this bill is very critical. We cannot delay it," said Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. Without the money, she said, next week federal reimbursements for state projects could drop to as little as 64 percent of promised funds.

___

The bill is H.R. 6532.

___

On the Net:

Congress: http://thomas.loc.gov
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2008, 08:40 AM   #2915
HAWC1506
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Bellevue, WA + Munich, Bavaria
Posts: 1,280
Likes (Received): 28

"The federal fuel tax is 18.4 cents a gallon, or 24.3 cents for diesel."

Absolutely ridiculous...
HAWC1506 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2008, 08:25 PM   #2916
jchernin
Registered User
 
jchernin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Santa Rosa/North Bay
Posts: 508
Likes (Received): 536

some pix of i-80 near sacramento, ca that i took in july coming back from tahoe. there's a bunch of other pix of some highways closer to home in the non-interstate thread as well.





jchernin no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2008, 09:06 PM   #2917
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

That's a pretty wide freeway. Doesn't look that nice to drive on though
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2008, 09:24 PM   #2918
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

5 through lanes. Kinda like the Dutch A4, Timon

However, California has a lot of 2x5 (10) lane freeways, but the number of freeways having more (through) lanes than that is very limited.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2008, 11:27 PM   #2919
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

I'm not talking about that Chris I count more than 5; 8 or sth. Perhaps they aren't through lanes, they are there and they are next to each other.
btw: I have to get used to 2×5, since I live very close to the dutch A2
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 13th, 2008, 11:28 PM   #2920
Alex Von Königsberg
Registered User
 
Alex Von Königsberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 11

In the USA, they widen motorways mostly near the junctions with other motorways/highways. It's pretty rare to see a 2x5 motorway running continuously through suburban/urban area.

On the picture above, if you continue driving toward San Francisco, you will soon (~1 km ahead) find yourself on a 2x2 motorway. It's not a big deal since most of traffic exits at CA-99. Prior to this junction, I-80 has 4 lanes in W/B direction.
Alex Von Königsberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
america, california, highway, highways, interstate, los angeles, united states, urban

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium