daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 19th, 2008, 12:03 PM   #3081
Tom 958
Registered User
 
Tom 958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: near Atlanta
Posts: 786
Likes (Received): 163

Quote:
Originally Posted by HAWC1506 View Post
That bridgedeck looks really thin.
Yes, it does. It's something of an optical illusion since the deck is thicker in the middle and tapers at the edges, but it still looks as though the weight of a train would be enough to tip the whole thing over. But it isn't-- I asked an engineer friend about it. Concrete is heavier than it looks...

Still, MARTA went for a more traditional design on later segments. I hope the early design doesn't turn out to be something we deeply regret doing.

I worked on a section of the South Line that used this design. The deck is made of precast sections about ten feet long set atop an eight foot wide steel box girder. One Saturday some segments were being set with a crane near an auto repair shop. A customer drove in, parked his car, then went inside the shop to talk with the owner. While he was inside, the ground collapsed under one of the crane's outriggers and the precast segment fell on his car, squashing it flat as a pancake.
Tom 958 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 20th, 2008, 10:43 PM   #3082
Verso
Islander
 
Verso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ljubljana
Posts: 22,086
Likes (Received): 4749

Nice pics, Timon. How long were you in the US?
Verso no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 20th, 2008, 11:35 PM   #3083
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

About 5½ weeks.
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2008, 02:48 AM   #3084
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,445
Likes (Received): 56

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post


He seems about right here. Problem is the road network did not catch up with the extreme vastness of the Atlanta agglomeration. But what to do about it? You can widen or add freeways in those suburban areas but how wide should the system be around downtown? You can't just add endless amounts of lanes around downtown areas. And downtown Atlanta's freeways are already pretty wide. Maybe it's the way how the network is layed out. Too much traffic centers around the I-75/I-85 overlap. Perhaps they should've build a small beltway around downtown with a bit more radiating expressways/freeways so traffic is more spread out and reduces the chances for huge delays on the one freeway that's actually there.



Yeah makes sense. Higher densities give public transport a chance of being efficient, however PT does not takes enough traffic off the road in order not having to increase capacity of the existing highway network.
The freeway system you are advocating would have completely gutted Atlanta of its core neighborhoods, you know, the bricks and mortar of a city.

Atlanta has a vast freeway system and all of its main freeways are very wide. Yet traffic is awful. Building more freeways only encouraged people to move further away from the city center and enticed developers to build autocentric sprawl.


Atlanta needs to build a commuter rail system to alleviate traffic congestion.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2008, 10:59 AM   #3085
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,568
Likes (Received): 19354

You're trying to characterise me as someone who wants to pave of metro Atlanta, always good for NIMBY's huh.

Building a commuter rail to alleviate traffic congestion is money down the drain. They would only spend half or more of their transportation budget to accomodate only a few percent of the traffic. Therefore, problems on freeways will only increase because of lack of funding.

You can't just build a commuter rail in a virtually semi-rural area and then say all problems are over. The entire Atlanta area needs to be restructured in order to make the public transportation stand a chance. Something what would be far more radical for the Atlanta public than building a few expressways here and there.

Though I don't think either modality would solve traffic problems. It's the way Atlanta is build.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2008, 03:37 PM   #3086
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

Another problem is of course that the suburbs are very widespread. And everyone has big houses with big gardens, meaning that the pop density is relatively low. This means that on average people have to travel bigger distances to get to the train station, which causes other problems.
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2008, 01:47 AM   #3087
HAWC1506
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Bellevue, WA + Munich, Bavaria
Posts: 1,280
Likes (Received): 28

Hey how about let's enjoy some 'Autumn' sites of Washington :]

After getting off I-90 and making a few turns, I took these with my phone:

































Enjoy :]
HAWC1506 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2008, 04:45 PM   #3088
Verso
Islander
 
Verso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Ljubljana
Posts: 22,086
Likes (Received): 4749

Nice colors.
Verso no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2008, 05:14 PM   #3089
Timon91
Error
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: just outside Germany
Posts: 5,783
Likes (Received): 46

Over here it's getting there. It's getting colder and we have more wind and rain. Time to get my rain suit out (today was nice though)
__________________
My Flickr account.
Some of my photoseries: Northern Ireland, Prague, Boston, Alaska part 1, 2, 3, Smoggy Moscow, Warsaw, Wrocław, Kiev, Donetsk, Odessa and Chişinău.
Timon91 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2008, 06:42 PM   #3090
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,445
Likes (Received): 56

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
You're trying to characterise me as someone who wants to pave of metro Atlanta, always good for NIMBY's huh.

Building a commuter rail to alleviate traffic congestion is money down the drain. They would only spend half or more of their transportation budget to accomodate only a few percent of the traffic. Therefore, problems on freeways will only increase because of lack of funding.

You can't just build a commuter rail in a virtually semi-rural area and then say all problems are over. The entire Atlanta area needs to be restructured in order to make the public transportation stand a chance. Something what would be far more radical for the Atlanta public than building a few expressways here and there.

Though I don't think either modality would solve traffic problems. It's the way Atlanta is build.
Actually, there are several good potential commuter rail corridors in Atlanta. I have studied the area.

A NW line out to Smyrna, Marietta, and beyond would do a great job taking passenger traffic off of I-75. Extending MArta north to Alpharetta would reduce congestion on U.S. 19. A commuter line heading northeast to Lawrenceville would take traffic off of I-85. You get the picture.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 22nd, 2008, 06:55 PM   #3091
AUchamps
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 386
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
Actually, there are several good potential commuter rail corridors in Atlanta. I have studied the area.

A NW line out to Smyrna, Marietta, and beyond would do a great job taking passenger traffic off of I-75. Extending MArta north to Alpharetta would reduce congestion on U.S. 19. A commuter line heading northeast to Lawrenceville would take traffic off of I-85. You get the picture.
We don't call it US 19.

Call it 400 from here on out, because that's the name of the road. Simply, "400".
AUchamps no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 24th, 2008, 04:07 AM   #3092
Tom 958
Registered User
 
Tom 958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: near Atlanta
Posts: 786
Likes (Received): 163

Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
Actually, there are several good potential commuter rail corridors in Atlanta. I have studied the area.

A NW line out to Smyrna, Marietta, and beyond would do a great job taking passenger traffic off of I-75. Extending MArta north to Alpharetta would reduce congestion on U.S. 19. A commuter line heading northeast to Lawrenceville would take traffic off of I-85. You get the picture.
I'm a supporter of commuter rail in Atlanta, but it's unlikely that it would have a detectable effect on congestion. Any capacity improvement is subject to the effects of triple convergence: users avoid a congested facility by using alternate routes, alternate modes and/or alternate travel times, and if capacity is increased, many of those users will return. Plus there will be new users in such a fast-growing area.

MARTA up 400 is a nonstarter. It's too expensive to build, too expensive to operate, and wouldn't serve the travel demands of the corridor. The last segment of MARTA rail to open-- in the 400 corridor-- forced a fare increase that drove away more riders than the new extension attracted. System ridership fell. That's part of the reason why there are no extensions of MARTA heavy rail in the RTP.

Chris is right: "The entire Atlanta area needs to be restructured in order to make the public transportation stand a chance." To that I'll add that accomplishing that reconstruction will require either truly wrenching economic changes or a degree of political will that's totally out of character for the Atlanta region.

Last edited by Tom 958; October 24th, 2008 at 04:08 AM. Reason: typo
Tom 958 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2008, 04:47 AM   #3093
Tom 958
Registered User
 
Tom 958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: near Atlanta
Posts: 786
Likes (Received): 163

Double post, change of topic: Double level waterfront freeway, I-229 in St. Joseph, MO.

http://www.google.com/maphp?hl=en&q=...08862&t=k&z=16

The interchange with US 36 just south of here is... not what I would've expected.
Tom 958 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2008, 10:06 AM   #3094
HAWC1506
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Bellevue, WA + Munich, Bavaria
Posts: 1,280
Likes (Received): 28

I've just realised how much space American highways waste, especially on ramps and interchanges. Wouldn't it be cheaper if it were more condensed like Europe and used less land?
HAWC1506 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2008, 11:42 AM   #3095
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,568
Likes (Received): 19354

A Texas stack consumes less space than a Dutch cloverleaf
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2008, 12:17 PM   #3096
Astralis
Out of time
 
Astralis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: ATW
Posts: 11,932
Likes (Received): 26

Highways, interstates and roads in general are much wider than in Europe. Besides having more lanes (usually 5, 6 or more near and in the big cities) the lane itself is wider than lane in Europe plus you have service lanes on both left and right sides in each way. Even normal roads (they call them highways sometimes; they can have 2+ lanes in each way in some unimportant rural place but they also have traffic lights all the way meaning not all of the intersections have multi levels) have service lanes on both sides no matter if it has only one lane or 2+ lanes in each way. All of this results with greater safety on the US roads. I was always wondering how come it is so easy to get the driving licence in US (I mean you can easily get a permit for driving heavy trucks) and accidents are pretty rare. Now I know the reason . This summer I made about 8-9 thou km alltogether in US and I've seen only 2 accidents (which were mild and due to really bad weather).
Astralis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2008, 05:00 PM   #3097
konrakfon
User of Thailand
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Samut Sakhon - Korat
Posts: 332
Likes (Received): 0

Interstate 5 Northbound

California State Exit 136B

From www.westcoastroads.com

__________________
" SAMUT SAKHON PROVINCES "
konrakfon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2008, 05:06 PM   #3098
konrakfon
User of Thailand
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Samut Sakhon - Korat
Posts: 332
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by HAWC1506 View Post
35W sculptures aren't just for looks


Cemstone became the first company in the nation to use a new form of concrete that removes carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides and sulfur dioxide from the atmosphere.

The photocatalytic concrete debuted as a pair of 30-foot sculptures installed in the median of the new Interstate 35W Bridge.

The two sculptures are constructed from a unique concrete that uses ultraviolet sunlight to promote and accelerate oxidation at the surface of the structures. In addition to keeping the sculptures a bright white color, the concrete allows for the conversion of smog-causing gases such as carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides and sulfur dioxide to higher oxidized states. This is the same process used by a catalytic converter in automobiles.

The monuments were designed using the international cartographic symbol for water.

Founded in 1927, Cemstone operates more than 50 ready-mix concrete plants in Minnesota, western Wisconsin, and northern Iowa.



Oh !!!!
Very Good !!!!
__________________
" SAMUT SAKHON PROVINCES "
konrakfon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2008, 11:08 PM   #3099
LtBk
Registered User
 
LtBk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Greater Baltimore
Posts: 3,102
Likes (Received): 3705

Quote:
Originally Posted by Astralis View Post
Highways, interstates and roads in general are much wider than in Europe. Besides having more lanes (usually 5, 6 or more near and in the big cities) the lane itself is wider than lane in Europe plus you have service lanes on both left and right sides in each way. Even normal roads (they call them highways sometimes; they can have 2+ lanes in each way in some unimportant rural place but they also have traffic lights all the way meaning not all of the intersections have multi levels) have service lanes on both sides no matter if it has only one lane or 2+ lanes in each way. All of this results with greater safety on the US roads. I was always wondering how come it is so easy to get the driving licence in US (I mean you can easily get a permit for driving heavy trucks) and accidents are pretty rare. Now I know the reason . This summer I made about 8-9 thou km alltogether in US and I've seen only 2 accidents (which were mild and due to really bad weather).
The US has a lot of accidents, you just don't see them or hear much about them(except from traffic reports).
LtBk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 26th, 2008, 12:46 AM   #3100
Dan
Registered User
 
Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Scotland / Ireland
Posts: 1,244
Likes (Received): 3

Yeah, in fact the US has one of the worst accident/death rates of the developed world, sadly.
Dan no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
america, california, highway, highways, interstate, los angeles, united states, urban

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium