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Old October 28th, 2008, 01:47 AM   #3141
HAWC1506
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Sorry, it will be a little far and expensive for me
Regarding all said above about obtaining your drivers license, there seem to be differences in how difficult it is to get it. Besides NJ, are there any other states where it is very difficult to get? I wonder if people go to the ''easy'' states if they live in a "difficult" state, if you know what I mean.
I am not entirely sure if people do that, but every state has a different law. Some states might even require you to retake the test according to their standards. You cannot drive in Oregon with a Washington license (you can, but I think there is a time limit, which is about a month or so I believe). The thing about the U.S. is that everything is so disjointed and unorganised that there isn't really a standard. Which can work out to be good in some ways, especially when you have a leader and a state who are both willing to stand up and move forward ahead of others. But so far, nothing like that has happened.
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Old October 28th, 2008, 10:39 AM   #3142
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So if you decided you wanted to move to Portland, you'd have to redo your exam? That's bad. The US really needs a nationwide standard, but with 50 states and thus 50 different opinions, that'll be very hard to get through
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Old October 28th, 2008, 06:56 PM   #3143
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So if you decided you wanted to move to Portland, you'd have to redo your exam? That's bad. The US really needs a nationwide standard, but with 50 states and thus 50 different opinions, that'll be very hard to get through
It can also work out to your benefit. For example, Texas has a very limited demerit point system, and generally does not count out-of-state violations toward it. That's nice, because insurance companies generally only look at the state reports to adjust your rates.

National standards would be a hard sell because of the varying different needs of the different states. One needs very different skillsets for driving in New Jersey compared to Wyoming.
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Old October 28th, 2008, 07:02 PM   #3144
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And what about Canada? Do they have a national standard? It seems like you also need different skills to drive in Toronto and in Yellowknife, for example.
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Old October 28th, 2008, 07:22 PM   #3145
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Canada has a similar licensing system to that of the USA. There is no nation-wide standard driving licence there.
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Old October 28th, 2008, 10:00 PM   #3146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon91 View Post
So if you decided you wanted to move to Portland, you'd have to redo your exam? That's bad. The US really needs a nationwide standard, but with 50 states and thus 50 different opinions, that'll be very hard to get through
The USA is a federal republic where the states created the federal government and not the other way around - the states handle most everyday legal stuff like licensing and criminal law, for example (note, the Feds license electronic communications and aircraft pilots). Driving licensing is handled at the state level although, under the USConstitution's 'full faith and credit clause', if you are licensed in one state, it is recognized by all states, ditto if revoked, suspended, etc. Transferring a license from one state to another usually involves little more than making sure that identification is proved (some states are more strict than others on that part).

'Commercial' driving licenses (ie, lorries, coaches, etc) are also done at the state level (using federal standards), but with much greater safeguards on making sure that if someone is revoked in one state, that revocation is recognized in all of the others.

Mike
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Old October 29th, 2008, 03:21 AM   #3147
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There's no need for this road, and I say that as an expressway enthusiast.

Road transported long distance cargo cannot and will not be the way of the future.
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Old October 29th, 2008, 04:40 AM   #3148
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Originally Posted by Timon91 View Post
So if you decided you wanted to move to Portland, you'd have to redo your exam? That's bad. The US really needs a nationwide standard, but with 50 states and thus 50 different opinions, that'll be very hard to get through
I sort of wish there was a strict, national standard. No matter which state you are in, you are still in the same country. If you live in New Mexico but will drive in the snow up in Michigan, you'll still need the skill. Every driver in the U.S. should be ready for all conditions and up to standard.
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Old October 29th, 2008, 05:41 AM   #3149
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The North American Stupid Highway ranks somewhere between the Ryugyong Hotel and building an elevator to the moon. In other words: idiocy and pure fantasy.

I suppose there is demand for this kind of project under the current US administration though. Reminds me of the serious American idea of building a fence along the entire US/Canada border. Maybe I'm out of touch; idiocy is the new common-sense.
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Old October 30th, 2008, 07:09 AM   #3150
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Hey I know this isn't a State-Route thread, but this proposal has to be worthy of notice. This is a proposal to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct for SR 99 through Seattle.

Chopp unveils ambitious Viaduct plan
House speaker's proposal includes shops, a park and yes, a highway

By LARRY LANGE
P-I REPORTER

An elevated highway, a park, shops and offices, a pedestrian-friendly place where cars can bypass downtown Seattle two stories above ground.

Speaker of the House Frank Chopp's idea for replacing the Alaskan Way Viaduct, he said Tuesday, is " a way of including everybody's bottom line."

There have been long arguments over whether to replace the viaduct with a tunnel, another elevated highway or remove it altogether and disperse the traffic to other streets and into buses.

Chopp's ambitious idea, not yet given a price tag, would replace the viaduct with a mile-long, four-level structure open to retail space on the first level, offices on the second, highway lanes on the third and a park on top.

The new structure would accommodate more traffic than a "surface-transit" replacement, would provide a new waterfront park with sweeping views and could be partly paid for with rents on the retail and office space.

The idea stirred great interest among about two dozen Manufacturing Industrial Council members, business managers and industrialists who have been skeptical of the idea of removing the viaduct and shifting the traffic to the surface.

"Out of everything I've seen so far, this is the most exciting," said Tukwila plastics manufacturer Clint Cox.

Engineers from the city, state and county are analyzing the eight options to see how each option performs. One of them is Chopp's proposed "waterfront parkway," though it's described among the eight-option list as a "four-lane integrated elevated" highway.

Other possibilities include one other elevated four-lane highway without park or other amenities; two tunnels; three "surface" traffic options; and a partially lidded trench that would distribute traffic above ground to the Battery Street Tunnel.

Chopp, a Seattle Democrat, has worked on the proposal for more than a year but has remained relatively quiet about it until now.

At Tuesday's session with the business officials he displayed drawings showing ground-level businesses with access to the waterfront and elevators taking pedestrians to upper levels and the park. He said the new structure could be built in two steps, from west to east, possibly in a shorter time than other options. He'd leave four lanes of traffic on much of Alaskan Way.

The plan now envisions two bus stops but no ramps to downtown, a change that brought questions. He said amenities such as the park couldn't be built by the state but could be financed with leases revenue and sale of development rights. He could not say how much of the cost might be raised or what effects the construction would have.

Chopp said designers and developers, many in favor of removing the viaduct and redesigning the waterfront, have so far listened "and then they want to keep their mouths shut." Tuesday's attendees said traffic movement was their priority.

"You can paint it pink as far as we're concerned, as long as you can get through on it," said Peter Whitehead, owner of Nelson Trucking.City, county and state staffers will complete analysis of Chopp's option and the other seven next month and report their results to a 30-member committee of citizen "stakeholders" for comment. They are then expected to offer two or three options to Gov. Chris Gregoire, Mayor Greg Nickels and King County Executive Ron Sims by the end of the year.

State legislators were intrigued but had a wait-and-see reaction. Nickels declined to comment and Sims' spokeswoman, Carolyn Duncan, said Sims is "keeping an open mind. In general, Ron has been most supportive of a surface-transit option and I don't believe that has changed. Of course, that's not what Chopp's proposal is."
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Old October 31st, 2008, 04:44 AM   #3151
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Yes, this highway is a horrible idea. HSR does not have to be as a part of this new mega highway that will destroy VAST swaths of land.

Upgrade I-35 if necessary. Investing in expanded freight and passenger rail along I-35 will take a lot of traffic off the highway.
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Old October 31st, 2008, 04:58 AM   #3152
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It's pretty easy to get a driver's license in Indiana. You go the DMV, take the written exam (50 questions, I can't remember how many you can get wrong before you fail the test). Then you can schedule an appointment to take your driving test. If you pass that, then you get your license!!

Driver's ed is not required to get a license, but it does lower insurance premiums.
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Old October 31st, 2008, 05:35 AM   #3153
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No driver's ed? Our driving standards are much worse that I realized.
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Old October 31st, 2008, 06:09 AM   #3154
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
It's pretty easy to get a driver's license in Indiana. You go the DMV, take the written exam (50 questions, I can't remember how many you can get wrong before you fail the test). Then you can schedule an appointment to take your driving test. If you pass that, then you get your license!!

Driver's ed is not required to get a license, but it does lower insurance premiums.
Driver's ed isn't really a requirement in most, if not all states for people over the age of 18. Those mandatory driver's ed requirements for provisional licenses have been targeting the youngsters.

Alabama is a lot like Indiana... I just took a written test, and a 10 minute road test and had my license. I had driver's ed in high school, but it didn't lower my premiums nor was it a requirement.
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Old October 31st, 2008, 10:27 AM   #3155
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My dad got his license in the army, and he didn't pay a single guilder for it. Now I have to pay at least 2000 euros, almost 4500 guilders
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Old October 31st, 2008, 07:22 PM   #3156
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In all the areas I knew Driver's Ed was a scheduled class in your public schools for 15-16 year olds.

The classes are free, and if you pass the class you don't have to take a drivers test at your local government office to get your license. You just bring in your slip of paper from the school saying you passed.

A license costs $16 to obtain.

So overall myself and all my friends growing up spent $16 (although I think it was cheaper back then, 10 years ago).
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Old October 31st, 2008, 07:43 PM   #3157
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The USA is a federal republic where the states created the federal government and not the other way around - the states handle most everyday legal stuff like licensing and criminal law, for example (note, the Feds license electronic communications and aircraft pilots). Driving licensing is handled at the state level although, under the USConstitution's 'full faith and credit clause', if you are licensed in one state, it is recognized by all states, ditto if revoked, suspended, etc. Transferring a license from one state to another usually involves little more than making sure that identification is proved (some states are more strict than others on that part).

'Commercial' driving licenses (ie, lorries, coaches, etc) are also done at the state level (using federal standards), but with much greater safeguards on making sure that if someone is revoked in one state, that revocation is recognized in all of the others.

Mike

Exactly, I wish more people would remember this when they talk about things done strangely here.

This country was formed by many different states with different identities who grouped together and formed The United States of America as a blanket power that would streamline economics, defense and foriegn relations for all those states who joined their union. Strength in numbers. It was much like the European Union really when it was created. The states are in charge of all daily matters and the life and situation of its residents. The Federal Government is there to protect everyone involved, to oversee the economy and to make broad rules to assure that all 50 states function together as a friendly unit. Until WWI and WWII, the federal government was actually extremely small and did not exert much power over the country as a whole. Think back in the 1800's, it took months to figure out who was elected, and people didn't really care about the federal government. Only when information technology and transportation/communication became so fast was the Federal Government able to have solid control over things on a daily basis.

States get in fights all the time over things, but it never gets out of control because the Federal Government is there all the time to make sure that the union holds together and we don't lose that stability.



We all know we're Americans, and we can have that national pride, but in your personal life and the life of your family, your state tends to come before anything else. Growing up I knew I was born and bred in IOWA. I was an Iowan and that was must more important in my life than being part of the United States, which is a hodge podge of so many different areas and people that I have nothing in common with. Your individual life revolves around your state, but the entire population of the 50 states falls under the USA.

Last edited by Chicagoago; October 31st, 2008 at 07:48 PM.
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Old November 1st, 2008, 03:33 AM   #3158
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In all the areas I knew Driver's Ed was a scheduled class in your public schools for 15-16 year olds.

The classes are free, and if you pass the class you don't have to take a drivers test at your local government office to get your license. You just bring in your slip of paper from the school saying you passed.

A license costs $16 to obtain.

So overall myself and all my friends growing up spent $16 (although I think it was cheaper back then, 10 years ago).
Yeah it all depends on the state. In Washington, Drivers Ed is offered in school and outside of school. If you take drivers ed though, you get a waiver for the written test to get your PERMIT. You still have to take the written test for the license. License is like...30 dollars I think? The drivers ed course was $200 or something.
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Old November 1st, 2008, 03:34 AM   #3159
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My dad got his license in the army, and he didn't pay a single guilder for it. Now I have to pay at least 2000 euros, almost 4500 guilders
My dear! Another government's step in limiting the number of motorists?
In Poland it costs (a course and an exam) about 400 euro
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Old November 1st, 2008, 10:41 AM   #3160
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For that price we get good lessons, so we are really "ready for the road" when we get our license. At least better than in the USA. However, the price is way too much. Young people can hardly afford it themselves anymore. Some of my friends who've just become 18 have their license because their parents paid for it. Some other 18 year old friends of mine don't have their license because they have to pay for it themselves and they can't afford it. I'm not sure whether I'm going to get my license once I get 18, because students get a so called "OV-jaarkaart" with which they can travel with the public transport for free (you can choose whether you want it on weekdays or in weekends). That is also a good and safe way to get around. But if parents pay, I'm fine with it.
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