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Old November 15th, 2008, 06:53 PM   #3281
sotonsi
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you mean route 238 in CA partially being a state route, partially being an Interstate. That's like the equivalent of part of the A404 in the UK being a motorway - the A404(M) near Maidenhead. I-74 has the US route and Interstate will meet at right angles at each end of a long multiplex, with US74 being a freeway for at least a short distance after losing I-74 in each direction. I-74 in the Carolinas is really a N-S Interstate (slightly more diagonal than I-73), whereas US 74 is very much E-W. A further example, future I-41 would be far more an I-238 thing where it's an interstate portion of US41.

In California routes carry one, unique, number. There are both interstate and non-interstate parts of routes 8, 15, 110, 210 (IIRC), 710 (the bit connected to 210) and 238. These routes' numbers all follow the interstate numbering system, save 238. Other routes, when part of them changed to interstate, had the number of the interstate part changed to one that fitted the system (17 to 880, 24 to 980). The problem was the lack of spare x80 numbers for the route 238 bit (though I-980 is pretty much signed To I-580/To I-880 throughout, and similar signage exists on I-238, though there's more I-238 shields to rub it in). I guess one could call it I-380, and have mileage markers working as if I-380 crossed the bay. 710 is in two chunks, awaiting completion, why not 380 (even though there are no plans to cross the Bay).

I like quirks, so I-238 can stay.

I guess, the best solution to the Bay City numbers problem is to renumber the 58 as 40, and have I-580 east of Oakland as I-58. Then you can renumber some x80s as x58s and have some new x80s and x58s in the Bay Area. Then again, all that renumbering would be costly!

The best solution to the I-74/US74 problem would be to number the I-26 to Wilmington US74 freeway as I-28, and have I-74 end south of Greensboro, or better yet, not enter NC, with the planned I-74 and I-274 routes picking up 3di numbers from other interstates (I-840 for I-274, with I-840 round Greensboro picking up an x73 number, and then I-777, I-373 or both for the I-74 route)
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Old November 16th, 2008, 02:45 AM   #3282
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In New York parkway doesn't mean a single type of a road. It can be a regular wide street in the city, like ocean parkway in Brooklyn:



Or it can be a regular highway like Belt Parkway:



The only difference between a belt parkway and a highway is that if you have commercial license plates then you're not allowed to drive there. Though everyone just thinks of it as of a regular highway, no difference between BQE, West side highway or the Belt, they're all highways to regular users. From my experience it doesn't matter if you're driving a truck or a tiny compact car, all that matters is the class of your license plates. I learned it when I was driving a little PT Cruiser that had commercial license plates and found out, to my surprise, that half of the highways were off limits for me.
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Old November 16th, 2008, 05:27 AM   #3283
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It's not that simple

Actually, the term parkway in New York is used when there is a lot of greenery; it's like a park in a roadway. Ocean Parkway is a prime example, as shown in your photo. You're right in the license plate issue, though, and legally, that is the only difference between parkways and other streets or highways.
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Old November 18th, 2008, 12:13 AM   #3284
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Around here (in southwest virginia), there is one type of parkway, and there is one example of that type: The Blue Ridge Parkway, running from god-knows-where in North Carolina, maybe, i have no idea really where its southern end is, up to just north of I-64 in Virginia where it becomes Skyline Drive, a toll road (very rare around these parts). The BRP is often little more than a rural limited access 2-lane undivided road with occasional "overlooks" for drivers to stop and look off into the mountains and valleys and whatnot. The BRP is technically a national park, so all signs related to it are brown with white text, but since it follows the Blue Ridge for several hundred miles, and is a road rather than what most of us think of as a national park (Yellowstone or Shenandoah nat'l park for example) that fact is not well known.

As far as its road style goes, i's pretty much what most state routes are like: two lanes, not divided, white edge lines with a center line depending on where passing is allowed or not, speed limit generally 45 or 55. The edge barriers are usually wooden, rarely more than a foot high, and made just perfectly so that if you run off the road, your car will be upside down when it hits the ground (these barriers are used alongside a steep dropoff on the ridge) The curves aren't much less sharp than curves on other mountain roads...

The main differences are:
- Alcoholic beverages strictly prohibited
- Occasional asphalt-lined drainage ditches on one or both sides
- Periodic overlooks with a small parking lot for people to enjoy the view
- Speed limit signs say "Parkway speed 45" or "Parkway speed 55" depending on conditions
- The road is limited access, with occasional ramps to leave but no at-grade intersections
- The parkway only goes along the top (more or less) of the Blue Ridge, never going into any valleys or other mountains or ridges (except the spur for Mll Mountain near Roanoke, VA)
- Park rangers are the primary law enforcement, rather than state police or local police/sheriff deputies
- Signs pointing to it on other roads are brown rather than green, and look nothing like standard highway signs (such as "interstate 81" signs, or "US 220" signs)
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Old November 19th, 2008, 03:36 AM   #3285
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As a kid, The Franconia Notch Parkway ment that I was nearly home.
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Old November 19th, 2008, 11:04 AM   #3286
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
What tram at the Getty Centre? There's the thing they call a tram but that isn't it.
OK, the light rail terminal.
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Old November 19th, 2008, 01:44 PM   #3287
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Sorry - that was missing a wink. I was being jokingly pedantic.
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Old November 20th, 2008, 09:53 PM   #3288
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Interesting map I found:
That map disproves the argument that America can't afford to fix its infrastructure.
It can't afford NOT to.

Bush and his GOP cronies were supposedly so good on economic policy but couldn't figure it out that a good infrastructure is necessary to have a good economy!!!
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Old November 20th, 2008, 10:03 PM   #3289
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They just did everything by plane and the SUV's to get them around had such thick tires that you won't feel any bump
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Old November 21st, 2008, 01:01 AM   #3290
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timon91 View Post
They just did everything by plane and the SUV's to get them around had such thick tires that you won't feel any bump
They travel in American cars, which have overly thick tires and soft pillowy suspension to begin with.
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Old November 21st, 2008, 01:17 AM   #3291
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Interesting map I found:
Where is that money getting "lost" to? Someone's getting paid. I need to figure out how to get some of that money to be "lost" into my bank account.


I wonder though how great it would be for the economy if traffic jams were eliminated in the United States. I think it's possible.
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Old November 21st, 2008, 01:43 AM   #3292
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There's definitely something wrong with our infrastructure when Kansas has more highways than Washington...

Check out this article:
----------------------------------------------------
Semis, truck kill herd of cows on Highway 93

10:55 AM PST on Thursday, November 20, 2008

Associated Press

BOISE, Idaho -- Idaho State Police say 16 cows were hit and killed by a semi truck and two other vehicles on Highway 93 near Hollister.

No motorists were injured in the collisions Thursday morning.

Police say Christopher Kutzler, of Glendive, Mont., was driving the semi truck and trailer that first collided with several cows. The drivers of a Chevy Malibu and a Cadillac also struck the animals.

No citations were issued, and brand inspectors say the region is not considered open rangeland.
----------------------------------------------------

Poor cows.
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Old November 21st, 2008, 01:56 AM   #3293
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAWC1506 View Post
There's definitely something wrong with our infrastructure when Kansas has more highways than Washington...

Check out this article:
----------------------------------------------------
Semis, truck kill herd of cows on Highway 93

10:55 AM PST on Thursday, November 20, 2008

Associated Press

BOISE, Idaho -- Idaho State Police say 16 cows were hit and killed by a semi truck and two other vehicles on Highway 93 near Hollister.

No motorists were injured in the collisions Thursday morning.

Police say Christopher Kutzler, of Glendive, Mont., was driving the semi truck and trailer that first collided with several cows. The drivers of a Chevy Malibu and a Cadillac also struck the animals.

No citations were issued, and brand inspectors say the region is not considered open rangeland.
----------------------------------------------------

Poor cows.
I believe Kansas has more highways than Washington because there are more small farm towns across every part of the state, where as Washington has a lot of untouched land.

Hitting animals in the rocky mountain states is quite common. Eastern Idaho, in particular has a lot of problems with elk on highways, and believe it or not, dogs roaming on the roads in some areas as well.
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Old November 21st, 2008, 08:14 AM   #3294
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In the week is spent in southern BC, I saw a car hitting a deer twice. In Alaska we were quite afraid to hit a moose, because they're much bigger. Luckily the Alaskans moved a couple of metres of forest on either side of the road, which makes it much safer IMO. We saw moose standing in this small side area about seven times.
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Old November 21st, 2008, 11:36 PM   #3295
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
Where is that money getting "lost" to? Someone's getting paid. I need to figure out how to get some of that money to be "lost" into my bank account.


I wonder though how great it would be for the economy if traffic jams were eliminated in the United States. I think it's possible.
The money is "lost" or wasted due to longer shipping times, idling engines that burn fuel while the car goes nowhere, and lost productive hours at work.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 11:37 PM   #3296
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwalker View Post
I believe Kansas has more highways than Washington because there are more small farm towns across every part of the state, where as Washington has a lot of untouched land.
Kansas has something like the fourth or fifth largest public road mileage in the US, simply because it is a relatively large state (13th in area) with an almost completely developed grid of section-line roads. There are fewer public road miles overall in most Western states because the road grid tends to become highly attenuated in desert areas, and also less miles in most Eastern states because they are smaller and do not have enough local road mileage within their cities to compensate for the smaller area.

This said, the map is rather misleading. I am pretty sure all of the roads shown as gray lines are primary state highways of some description, but the Kansas map seems to show all state highways (Interstates and US and state routes) while the Missouri map is much more attenuated and seems to show just the US routes while Missouri is close to Kansas in terms both of rank and quantity of public road mileage.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 11:39 PM   #3297
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I don't know how exact that map is. I can't believe the I-40 in western New Mexico has that much traffic problems in the deserts.
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Old November 25th, 2008, 11:41 PM   #3298
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What's the map really about? Roads or railways?
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Old November 25th, 2008, 11:48 PM   #3299
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Roads.

It says "estimated roadway capacity". But they do mention railways. (the 500 freight trains a day in Chicago. We can learn from that in Europe).
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Old November 26th, 2008, 01:44 PM   #3300
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Nice video of the I-84 in New York crossing into Pennsylvania (Northwest of New York City).

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