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Old December 1st, 2008, 02:00 AM   #3341
HAWC1506
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LtBk View Post
I-83 is the only freeway in MD I been on where most drivers follow the "slower traffic kept right" rule.
It's really funny how it changes from highway to highway isn't it? In Seattle, virtually no one follows it on I-5. Nobody follows it on I-405. People on I-90 follow it on some days, while people in the reversible HOV lanes follow it very well. Drivers on SR520 also follow it quite well.
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Old December 1st, 2008, 10:08 AM   #3342
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If they get rid of the bottle neck at one part, it is going to spread up to other areas. That just happens to be the effect since people are no longer stuck going through downtown, they are now stuck outside of downtown.
True. You really need an integrated plan to solve all traffic jams. Widening a few spots here and there won't completely solve things.
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Old December 1st, 2008, 10:26 AM   #3343
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yeah.
the stupid greenies argue with this:
youve built this road and spent huge amount of taxpayers money and solved nothing.
So it has no sense to build new roads....
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Old December 1st, 2008, 11:24 AM   #3344
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People follow it on I-90 in rural areas. In Seattle metro area it's mostly disregarded.
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Old December 1st, 2008, 07:05 PM   #3345
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Since there is not so much traffic in rural areas, I'm not surprised.
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Old December 1st, 2008, 10:12 PM   #3346
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Doesn't I-83 have an exit to JHU (Hopkins)
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 01:05 AM   #3347
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My article about U.S. highways is up: http://www.autosavant.com/2008/12/01...lding-us-back/
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 01:33 AM   #3348
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Quite a good article. I think you hit the nail on the head when you answered the question 'why are US roads not among the best in the world?';

it’s because the general public doesn’t have the appreciation for perfection

That's very true. Indeed, most Americans I think still believe we lead the world when it comes to highway standards. I hope we will again, but we don't now do we? Far from it.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 01:43 AM   #3349
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billpa View Post
Quite a good article. I think you hit the nail on the head when you answered the question 'why are US roads not among the best in the world?';

it’s because the general public doesn’t have the appreciation for perfection

That's very true. Indeed, most Americans I think still believe we lead the world when it comes to highway standards. I hope we will again, but we don't now do we? Far from it.
Thank you! Unfortunately, that mindset has become part of modern American culture. The most important thing for the public now is to have something that works. It doesn't have to be high quality, it just has to work. It shows up in the design of our cars, roads, appliances, etc. which are almost always never leaders (although the car industry is improving). The U.S. used to be good at building for the future, but now the general public has become too shortsighted and blind.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 01:50 AM   #3350
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I must say I've heard the word "infrastructure" dozens of times since Obama won the election a month ago- so I have some hope that maybe more and more Americans are finally saying 'the roads are awful, let's fix them'. I wouldn't expect to see German quality motorways pop up anytime soon but I would LOVE to take a drive some weekend for a few hours and not hit a stretch of bumpy highways or roads that make the ride less than fun.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 02:00 AM   #3351
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Originally Posted by Billpa View Post
I must say I've heard the word "infrastructure" dozens of times since Obama won the election a month ago- so I have some hope that maybe more and more Americans are finally saying 'the roads are awful, let's fix them'. I wouldn't expect to see German quality motorways pop up anytime soon but I would LOVE to take a drive some weekend for a few hours and not hit a stretch of bumpy highways or roads that make the ride less than fun.
I have very high hopes too. But Obama is still a politician, no matter how many things he plans to address. Most likely, he will not demand that the U.S. bring quality levels up to competition. America is in such a desperate state right now we just need to get things fixed before we try to 'self-actualise.' He's a smart guy though and with his popularity in Germany, hopefully he will be able to gain some inspiration.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 10:35 AM   #3352
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Interesting article, Jason!

Quote:
In addition, I did not notice this while traveling, but after observing pictures, you can see that as the road curves, the roadbed tilts towards the direction of the turn for better traction, very much like what you see on German Autobahns and NASCAR tracks (although not quite as prominent).
I can only hope cross slopes are standard within highway designs! You can't make a tight curve without cross slope, otherwise you would've been pushed out of your lane by G-forces. The cross slope is usually 1,5 - 2% or 2,5% in wet areas. Yes, it's also build because of drainage.

Quote:
None of the overpasses, unfortunately, carries a smooth transition.
Due to dilatation joints, the transistion can never be 100% smooth, since temperature difference causes the bridge to expand a little. Otherwise the bridge would probably collapse.

A problem with repaving is that they usually do not repave bridge sections, as this is way more expensive than adding a general new layer of pavement. This is not only an issue in the United States, you'll see it in Europe too.

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Corner Cutting
Should not necessarily be a problem, but asphalt needs to be repaved every 12 years, moreoften with higher volumes. When potholes appear, you'd either did something wrong in the beginning, or are too late with repaving. (also depends on weather and tire conditions).
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 08:15 PM   #3353
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Doesn't I-83 have an exit to JHU (Hopkins)
To get to JHU, your best bet is to get off at 28th Street and then hang a left onto Charles St.
To get to the Hospital (Johns Hopkins Hosp), hang a left on Fayette St and then hang a left on Broadway.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 10:12 PM   #3354
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I can only hope cross slopes are standard within highway designs! You can't make a tight curve without cross slope, otherwise you would've been pushed out of your lane by G-forces. The cross slope is usually 1,5 - 2% or 2,5% in wet areas. Yes, it's also build because of drainage.
Crossfall is much as you describe, but the details vary considerably from state to state. One state may have a straight 2.5% crossfall from left to right on one carriageway of a dual two-lane freeway, while another may have a 2% crossfall from the center across the traveled way, increasing to 4% on the shoulders. Most states have standard plans explaining how to develop crossfall on a shoulder when it has to be opposite in sense to superelevation (e.g. when the road curves left but water has to drain off the shoulder to the right).

The AASHTO Green Book has standards for superelevation but I wouldn't describe them as consistent. The basic purpose of superelevation is to supplement side friction demand so that the car can move at a higher speed through a circular path than would otherwise be possible. There are several competing theories of how to distribute superelevation. The one which has traditionally been used in Britain and other western European countries is that superelevation should be a constant fraction of the total centripetal acceleration, regardless of speed. The US uses a rather eccentric theory which allows it to vary with speed--I think provision of superelevation is less generous at higher speeds.

The US also allows designers to choose the maximum superelevation for a length of road according to climate factors, such as the presence of ice during part of the year. Depending on the choice of maximum superelevation (values range from 4% to 8%), a curve of the same radius at the same design speed can have differing amounts of superelevation applied to it.

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Due to dilatation joints, the transition can never be 100% smooth, since temperature difference causes the bridge to expand a little. Otherwise the bridge would probably collapse.
This is true, but the problem of settlement at bridge abutments is worse in the US and my impression is that approach slab replacements are more frequent in US states than in western European countries with similar climate. It has been observed that US standards for subgrade compaction are looser than those used in western Europe. I don't know if this accounts for the rough ride at bridge abutments, but I suspect it does.

One common trick for dealing with local road crossings, which is frequently used in Europe but is rarely seen in the US, is to put the local road in a culvert. This eliminates the whole problem of expansion joints.

Are integral abutments used extensively in Europe?
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 02:00 AM   #3355
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Due to dilatation joints, the transistion can never be 100% smooth, since temperature difference causes the bridge to expand a little. Otherwise the bridge would probably collapse.

A problem with repaving is that they usually do not repave bridge sections, as this is way more expensive than adding a general new layer of pavement. This is not only an issue in the United States, you'll see it in Europe too.
Thanks! The overpasses were repaved. The eastbound direction has very smooth transitions. One of the overpasses doesn't even have the joints exposed. The westbound direction though is relatively poorly done. It seems like U.S. highways can be built right, it's just that they don't always build it right haha
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 11:25 AM   #3356
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I-40 in western New Mexico passes through Gallup, which actually has something of a rush hour, due to the fact that Gallup has basically developed along the freeway, and therefore, the residents utilize I-40 as sort of their main street. It's over its design capacity during the afternoon rush, but I'm not sure I would ever consider it to be congested.
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 11:38 AM   #3357
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http://www.nmshtd.state.nm.us/photo_...ity_Gallup.pdf

22.500 AADT on the I-40 in Gallup. That's an extremely quiet Interstate.
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 01:24 PM   #3358
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According to Caltrans traffic counts, the busiest freeway in the United States has become a little busier.

We're talking about the I-405 near Long Beach in California.

1992: AADT: 325,000
2006: AADT: 390,000
2007: AADT: 397,000
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 04:24 PM   #3359
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
http://www.nmshtd.state.nm.us/photo_...ity_Gallup.pdf

22.500 AADT on the I-40 in Gallup. That's an extremely quiet Interstate.
I checked the state traffic flow map and it appears AADTs on I-40 are in the 20,000-30,000 range pretty much all the way from the Arizona state line to the western city limits of Albuquerque. I remember much heavier traffic from when I drove it in the winter of 2004-05, but that could very well have been holiday traffic.
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Old December 3rd, 2008, 06:15 PM   #3360
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From phillyskyline.com ...
The New Jersey Turnpike in Southern NJ...

image hosted on flickr


The NJ Turnpike and I-295 come VERY close to one another for a short time

image hosted on flickr


The Turnpike is the motorway with the much longer dash lines between lanes.

image hosted on flickr
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