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Old January 3rd, 2009, 04:30 AM   #3581
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I agree. But it's still better in my opinion to detour via Houston and Bowery than lose your nerves in a standstill on FDR. And you can always buy some fresh groceries in Chinatown on your way

It seems that the main problem with Manhattan Bridge on Brooklyn side is that you don't have a direct access onto I-278, the main Brooklyn thoroughfare unlike when using BB. Maybe that's why the latter attracts more trafiic.
The Brooklyn Bridge doesn't have immediate access to the BQE east, instead people on the brooklyn bridge have to use the same ramp as what people from the manhattan bridge use to access the expwy, which is adjacent to the DUMBO area. Also to 278 west, you have to travel 1/3 mile south plus a couple of traffic lights in order to reach the ramp. one of the reasons people use the brooklyn bridge more as it provides a more simpler access for heading towards the verazzano without paying the tolls at the battery tunnel. plus the brooklyn bridge provides instant access to brooklyn heights and the manhattan bridge allows trucks and very narrow, where as the maximum height on the brooklyn is only 11 ft.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 12:16 AM   #3582
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Entering Philadelphia via Schuylkill Expressway (I-76)

















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Old January 4th, 2009, 12:19 AM   #3583
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http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h2...N/DSCF5064.jpg

Interesting, I never saw the 6/10 notation before. How long is this actually? 600 yards? a 6th of a mile? 600 feet?
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Old January 4th, 2009, 12:27 AM   #3584
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6/10 mile (1,08 km) I suppose
Maybe some American here can clarify.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 12:31 AM   #3585
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0,6 miles is most likely, since all other fraction numbers on the signs are also in miles
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Old January 4th, 2009, 01:46 AM   #3586
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Quote:
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http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h2...N/DSCF5064.jpg

Interesting, I never saw the 6/10 notation before. How long is this actually? 600 yards? a 6th of a mile? 600 feet?
1 mile = 5280 feet. So 6/10 mile = 3168 feet = 965.6 m (just shy of a full km). Generally fractional mileages are whole quarters of a mile but other fractions are not unknown--I think a sign somewhere quotes 1/5 mile, Minnesota DOT has some signs quoting 1/3 mile, and there is (if memory serves) another sign elsewhere in the Philadelphia area which says 1/8 mile.

The original interchange sequence signs in California did not use conventional fractions at all. Instead, distances were quoted in miles and tenths, with the tenths digit being presented as an underlined superscript (similar to underlined o and a superscripts for ordinal numbers in Spanish and Portuguese).
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Old January 4th, 2009, 05:41 AM   #3587
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J N Winkler View Post
1 mile = 5280 feet. So 6/10 mile = 3168 feet = 965.6 m (just shy of a full km). Generally fractional mileages are whole quarters of a mile but other fractions are not unknown--I think a sign somewhere quotes 1/5 mile, Minnesota DOT has some signs quoting 1/3 mile, and there is (if memory serves) another sign elsewhere in the Philadelphia area which says 1/8 mile.

The original interchange sequence signs in California did not use conventional fractions at all. Instead, distances were quoted in miles and tenths, with the tenths digit being presented as an underlined superscript (similar to underlined o and a superscripts for ordinal numbers in Spanish and Portuguese).
could this due to the fact that california borders mexico, which uses the metric system?.i do remember a rule that the metric system never uses fractions
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Old January 4th, 2009, 09:16 AM   #3588
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http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h2...N/DSCF5064.jpg

Interesting, I never saw the 6/10 notation before. How long is this actually? 600 yards? a 6th of a mile? 600 feet?
That's weird. Most places do it by quarters. I think that Pennsylvania is the only place to do that.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 10:01 AM   #3589
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This is I-10, 18 Lanes and the widest freeway in the U.S (maybe even the widest in the world)

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Old January 4th, 2009, 12:41 PM   #3590
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How long is that section with 18 lanes?
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Old January 4th, 2009, 01:12 PM   #3591
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This is I-10, 18 Lanes and the widest freeway in the U.S (maybe even the widest in the world)

That's the recently reconstructed Katy Freeway. It's 18 lanes for only a small section, and it includes the frontage roads which are not actually part of the freeway itself.

I think some section before an interchange with a large number of lanes doesn't really count, I'd like to count only sections between two regular exits.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 02:39 PM   #3592
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Cool, we will never see something like that in Europe
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Old January 4th, 2009, 02:51 PM   #3593
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That's a good thing

I'm not a fan of such wide roads that carry that much traffic. In my opinion, 2x4 should be the max, maybe 2x5 on short sections. Large traffic flows are prone to delays because of accidents, breakdowns, incidents etc. Spreading the traffic out is better in my opinion.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 05:56 PM   #3594
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I'm not a fan of such wide roads that carry that much traffic. In my opinion, 2x4 should be the max, maybe 2x5 on short sections. Large traffic flows are prone to delays because of accidents, breakdowns, incidents etc. Spreading the traffic out is better in my opinion.
I don't think the Katy Freeway has more than five lanes on any carriageway in any direction for any substantial distance. The 18 lanes are shared among the feeder roads and the Katy Tollway (which runs in the center) in addition to untolled I-10 itself.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 06:22 PM   #3595
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That's weird. Most places do it by quarters. I think that Pennsylvania is the only place to do that.
IIRC, Texas did it early on, maybe some other places, too. But quarter miles are better.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 08:57 PM   #3596
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Texas loves to make their cities as ugly as possible.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 09:16 PM   #3597
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Texas loves to make their cities as ugly as possible.
You should really visit a city in Texas before you say an opinion like that.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 09:33 PM   #3598
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Actually Texas cities look quite nice, interesting downtowns, like in San Antonio and Dallas, and nice residential areas with tree lined roads etc. (except the newer burbs ofcourse). Commercial zones and freeway surroundings seem less attractive though, especially in Houston. But I've also seen many pics of great landscaping.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 09:52 PM   #3599
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A bit of news: Utah is now testing 80 mph on a short stretch of I-15 freeway (35 miles long). A law passed in early 2008 allows I-15 speed limits in really rural parts to be raised to 80.
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Old January 4th, 2009, 10:02 PM   #3600
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Interstate 80: Des Moines - Omaha

A fast drive across I-80 from Des Moines, Iowa to Omaha, Nebraska.



by ShingleCreek
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