daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 23rd, 2009, 12:08 PM   #4401
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

This is one of the coolest Atlanta videos I have seen so far... The skylines at night are simply amazing, Buckhead is almost as good as downtown!
Make sure to watch in HD.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old June 23rd, 2009, 12:09 PM   #4402
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

This is one of the coolest Atlanta videos I have seen so far... The skylines at night are simply amazing, Buckhead is almost as good as downtown!
Make sure to watch in HD.


Buckhead:
[IMG]http://i44.************/2lwrlao.jpg[/IMG]

Midtown:
[IMG]http://i40.************/296irr4.jpg[/IMG]

Downtown
[IMG]http://i40.************/2ywzcz6.jpg[/IMG]
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2009, 01:10 PM   #4403
snowman159
Registered User
 
snowman159's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,469
Likes (Received): 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
About the road quality. Situations like this would be totally unacceptable in Europe..
Looks can be deceiving. You can't always tell from a picture what it actually feels like to drive on that road.

I remember several sections of motorway/autoroute/autobahn that were a lot worse than that - even in Germany!

Just a few rides from hell I'll never forget: French A36 (a toll highway iirc) and the toll-free A25, Belgian E411 and E25, German A13... those were the most "memorable" ones. I can't think of any interstate in the US that came even close - I was at the brink of insanity.

And, please, I don't want to provoke another juvenile Europe vs. US discussion.
snowman159 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2009, 01:30 PM   #4404
wdw35
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 471
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
About the road quality. Situations like this would be totally unacceptable in Europe.. You won't even find this in countries like Poland or Romania on freeways.

Location: I-43 near Milwaukee.
[IMG]http://i42.************/2rzunv4.jpg[/IMG]
No you won't find them in Romania (since there aren't many freeways), but then again I would prefer to have a freeway with those characteristics than a simple national road with excellent surface!
wdw35 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2009, 07:20 PM   #4405
ttownfeen
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: William T. Sherman's stomping grounds
Posts: 454
Likes (Received): 17

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
This is one of the coolest Atlanta videos I have seen so far... The skylines at night are simply amazing, Buckhead is almost as good as downtown!
Make sure to watch in HD.
The camera really doesn't do the view justice. On I-85S after you merge from GA 400, you can see off the to west (left hand side) the Buckhead towers creeping ever south along Peachtree Road. Eventually, Buckhead will merge with midtown and downtown to form one continuous urban core.
ttownfeen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2009, 08:56 PM   #4406
ADCS
Kickin' it
 
ADCS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Screwston, Plexus
Posts: 508
Likes (Received): 37

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddington View Post
Do you think most of urban Texas looks much different than that? I've travelled through Dallas and Houston pretty extensively and - outside of downtown - it basically looks like that, except even worse. There's just more lanes, more traffic, more Walmarts, more Motel 6's, more "El Loco Tacos" type places, all with big, ugly signs so that the person on the 16th lane of opposite side traffic can see it.
It would be unwise to forget how fast Texas's major cities grew in the second half of the 20th Century. Houston's metro area went from 1.4 million in 1960 (approximately when the base freeway system was planned and designed) to nearly 6 million today, an increase of 400%. Likewise, D/FW went from 1.7 million in 1960 to over 7 million today. Given the sprawly nature of this development, most of these suburban freeways were once in firmly rural areas. Not only that, but given that the feeders/service roads/access roads/frontage roads were the focal points for development in the new suburban areas, it's unfortunately inevitable that this is the result.

I'd recommend taking a look at pictures of the Hardy Toll Road (limited feeders) to see how Texas freeways could look.

[IMG]http://i39.************/1fjxpw.jpg[/IMG]
ADCS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2009, 09:20 PM   #4407
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

Yeah, I was reading the "Verkeerskunde", which translates as "traffic engineering", a magazine about traffic engineering (well it used to be, it's merely a public transport and cycling promotional magazine now unfortunatly).

It was about Houston, how the first answer to congestion was to "build more freeways".

I doubt if the author of that magazine really knew facts about Houston. First of all, Houston hasn't build new freeways for years, only some toll roads, and second of all, Houston adds 100,000 inhabitants per year. You cannot play Dutch and talk about one additional lane for 10 years then! At such population growths, you have to go big, and that's exactly what Houston is doing.

I do not always agree with how the road system in Houston is shaped, especially the commercial strips are a disaster, urban-wise, but they at least do something about it, Houston was the only city that actually saw a decrease in traffic congestion in the last 20 years while it grew by the millions in the same time.

As long as new developments are nearly 100% low-density suburban, you cannot dick around spending half the transportation budget on something only a few percent will use... This guy was actually talking about cycling, does he have any clue how big Houston is? It spans almost 60 miles! And did he know anything about Houston's climate? I guess not.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2009, 10:28 PM   #4408
mgk920
Nonhyphenated-American
 
mgk920's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Appleton, WI USA
Posts: 2,583
Likes (Received): 68

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
About the road quality. Situations like this would be totally unacceptable in Europe.. You won't even find this in countries like Poland or Romania on freeways.

Location: I-43 near Milwaukee.
[IMG]http://i42.************/2rzunv4.jpg[/IMG]
I'm not sure where near Milwaukee that part of I-43 is, but despite the look (and IIRC, that section has an asphalt surface on top of its original concrete), the ride on all of I-43 in the Milwaukee area is still pretty smooth. WisDOT usually keeps things fairly smooth - they are currently resurfacing a bad section of US 41 here in the Appleton area and just started a multi-year/$2 gigs+ project to completely rebuild and upgrade I-94 between the Illinois state line and Milwaukee's south side (about 60 km of motorway) from six to eight lanes. See: http://www.plan94.org/ for the details of this MASSIVE project.

Mike
mgk920 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 23rd, 2009, 11:09 PM   #4409
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,665
Likes (Received): 1261

I-5 through Northern California: Mount Shasta to Oregon border.



The green terrain initially is the well watered western side of of the mountain range (including Mount Shasta). Further north, the road goes through the more dry eastern side of the range. Weather patterns come from the west and tend to dump rain on the western side of mountain ranges, leaving the eastern side dry.
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 12:56 AM   #4410
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

Nice aerial of Kansas City. I-70 goes left (north) of downtown, I-670 right (south).
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 01:38 AM   #4411
ADCS
Kickin' it
 
ADCS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Screwston, Plexus
Posts: 508
Likes (Received): 37

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Yeah, I was reading the "Verkeerskunde", which translates as "traffic engineering", a magazine about traffic engineering (well it used to be, it's merely a public transport and cycling promotional magazine now unfortunatly).

It was about Houston, how the first answer to congestion was to "build more freeways".

I doubt if the author of that magazine really knew facts about Houston. First of all, Houston hasn't build new freeways for years, only some toll roads, and second of all, Houston adds 100,000 inhabitants per year. You cannot play Dutch and talk about one additional lane for 10 years then! At such population growths, you have to go big, and that's exactly what Houston is doing.

I do not always agree with how the road system in Houston is shaped, especially the commercial strips are a disaster, urban-wise, but they at least do something about it, Houston was the only city that actually saw a decrease in traffic congestion in the last 20 years while it grew by the millions in the same time.

As long as new developments are nearly 100% low-density suburban, you cannot dick around spending half the transportation budget on something only a few percent will use... This guy was actually talking about cycling, does he have any clue how big Houston is? It spans almost 60 miles! And did he know anything about Houston's climate? I guess not.
Yeah, the shocking thing is that Greater Houston MSA has a bigger area than the State of New Jersey - with two million fewer people. Needless to say, that lack of density combined with climate, compounded with the inevitable sprawl that comes with feeder development/ripping out the rail infrastructure/societal changes after the Civil Rights Era that heavily favored suburban development all led to Houston being a big mess that will be difficult to solve effectively.

The only real PT solution I can see for now is very high-speed (110 mph+ to compete with freeways) commuter rail from the suburbs, with high frequencies between major employment centers (DT, Uptown/Galleria, Energy Corridor, Greenspoint/IAH, Woodlands, Clear Lake, Sugar Land, Port of Houston) while having much less of a traditional infilled heavy or light rail system. The current plans are pretty extensive.

A more traditional system is not going to be feasible unless the suburbs start contracting, consequently increasing density, or population reaches LA levels within the current boundaries. Neither are predicted to happen for the next 20 years, so we're just going to have to deal with massive freeways along with other options in the meanwhile.
ADCS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 02:11 AM   #4412
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,446
Likes (Received): 58

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post

It was about Houston, how the first answer to congestion was to "build more freeways".

I doubt if the author of that magazine really knew facts about Houston. First of all, Houston hasn't build new freeways for years, only some toll roads, and second of all, Houston adds 100,000 inhabitants per year. You cannot play Dutch and talk about one additional lane for 10 years then! At such population growths, you have to go big, and that's exactly what Houston is doing.

I do not always agree with how the road system in Houston is shaped, especially the commercial strips are a disaster, urban-wise, but they at least do something about it, Houston was the only city that actually saw a decrease in traffic congestion in the last 20 years while it grew by the millions in the same time.

As long as new developments are nearly 100% low-density suburban, you cannot dick around spending half the transportation budget on something only a few percent will use... This guy was actually talking about cycling, does he have any clue how big Houston is? It spans almost 60 miles! And did he know anything about Houston's climate? I guess not.
Houston has a HUGE freeway network, and it has built way more than just a few toll roads. The city within the 610 loop is pretty dense and is well suited for cycling and light-rail, which it well get.

And the existing freeways are all huge and have been rebuilt/widened. There are four freeways and seven freeway legs that service DT Houston. That city has enough roads.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 02:15 AM   #4413
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,446
Likes (Received): 58

Here is a link to a site that has a map of Houston's light-rail network in 2012. It seems like a nice little system.

http://thetransportpolitic.com/2009/...stem-advances/
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 03:18 AM   #4414
zaphod
PRESIDENT OF SPACE
 
zaphod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,176
Likes (Received): 1674

Houston has seen a lot of road construction IMO. The I-10 widening should count as a whole new freeway I think, but whatever.

In the last ten years there has been openings on the Westpark, Fort Bend Tollroad, the 90A "mini freeway", the 90/Crosby freeway extension, the 249 extension, 290 extension, and so forth. They are just all in the suburbs and not in the city proper which of course has been built out as far as freeways go, except for a Hardy Toll Road connector and a 610-Fort Bend Tollway link via S. Post Oak of course
zaphod no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 04:42 AM   #4415
I-275westcoastfl
Registered User
 
I-275westcoastfl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 6,146
Likes (Received): 790

I'd rather have Houston's infrastructure than like most of the country where infrastructure is ignored and sprawl doesn't take a break even if the city or state won't upgrade the highways, just about every city in Florida is a perfect example of what sprawl would be like without the freeways.
I-275westcoastfl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 07:17 AM   #4416
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,172
Likes (Received): 10384

Well, although their highways have not been ignored, they have ignored their PT system and put all their eggs in the basket of highway building, to the degree that PT isn't even workable in that city anymore (moreso than many other US major cities).

If I was going to choose either Houston or Dallas when it comes to infrastructure, I'd choose Dallas...which has as large a highway network as Houston, but has a light rail network as well (unlike a single line like Houston). Maybe Houston could fix this problem in the future. There needs to be more of a balance, especially as the city hopefully gets more dense in the future.
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 11:35 AM   #4417
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,591
Likes (Received): 19378

But how do you get a city "more dense". You can maybe demolish a couple of inner city blocks or turn surface parking lots into apartment buildings, but Houston really need to demolish hundreds of thousands of homes and replace them with something denser to make public transportation more feasible, something I don't see happening.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 09:01 PM   #4418
mgk920
Nonhyphenated-American
 
mgk920's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Appleton, WI USA
Posts: 2,583
Likes (Received): 68

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
But how do you get a city "more dense". You can maybe demolish a couple of inner city blocks or turn surface parking lots into apartment buildings, but Houston really need to demolish hundreds of thousands of homes and replace them with something denser to make public transportation more feasible, something I don't see happening.
Much of that 'suburban' area is actually IN the City of Houston (the city limits extend WELL outside of I-610, and well outside of Beltway 8 in many directions, too) - they have had a legendary history in the annexation area. Also, without a municipal zoning law, when the market demand for more dense development 'close in' starts growing, the development will follow fairly quickly.

Mike
mgk920 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 24th, 2009, 11:30 PM   #4419
Xusein
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 26,172
Likes (Received): 10384

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
But how do you get a city "more dense". You can maybe demolish a couple of inner city blocks or turn surface parking lots into apartment buildings, but Houston really need to demolish hundreds of thousands of homes and replace them with something denser to make public transportation more feasible, something I don't see happening.
Houston doesn't even have zoning laws so the whole thing is moot, somewhat.

They do however have clusters of high density commercial districts scattered throughout the city. I suppose they can build some denser residential buildings near these office buildings, which would help commuting. However, building a PT network is probably very difficult there as I'm guessing most of these developments are around or along highways, and not railroads like in some other cities in the US.
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 25th, 2009, 01:19 PM   #4420
Jacek2000
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 107
Likes (Received): 3

Maybe somebody has pics of Los Angeles freeways. I have always found American freeways impressive. And I can't imagine how they were built. In Europe, there are only three-lane motorways without so high viaducts. I'm sure that such wide freeways and big intersections are nowhere in Europe but in America they are quite common.
Jacek2000 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
america, california, highway, highways, interstate, los angeles, united states, urban

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium