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Old August 30th, 2009, 10:28 PM   #4641
J N Winkler
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Shurely US 281? (Some have suggested it as the actual dividing line between East and West--it's the one I personally like.)
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Old August 30th, 2009, 10:32 PM   #4642
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Yeah that's the one I meant

The dividing line is interesting, although the cultural dividing line is still more the Mississippi, even if this geographically is not exactly in the center of contiguous United States.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 04:06 PM   #4643
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Yeah that's the one I meant

The dividing line is interesting, although the cultural dividing line is still more the Mississippi, even if this geographically is not exactly in the center of contiguous United States.
I think 50 years ago, you're absolutely right. Nowadays, either 281 or I-35 is a better line, I think. There's no real distinction between the industrial cities of the East and Midwest and the resource-extraction cities of the Eastern Plains, while points west still differ greatly
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Old August 31st, 2009, 04:22 PM   #4644
J N Winkler
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The dividing line depends on what is under consideration. US 281 makes sense more in terms of climate (it is where the arid West begins). Meanwhile, the 100th meridian is essentially the dividing line between checkerboard counties (usually 30 miles square) and the much larger counties seen further west where land uses are less intensive than grain farming.
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 09:29 AM   #4645
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADCS View Post
I think 50 years ago, you're absolutely right. Nowadays, either 281 or I-35 is a better line, I think. There's no real distinction between the industrial cities of the East and Midwest and the resource-extraction cities of the Eastern Plains, while points west still differ greatly
The way you categorized the cities just seemed really cool like how you said resource extraction etc. Is there some sort of urban studies categorization of all major cities in the USA and their primary contributions to the national economy I wonder? Now I know generalizations are often too general, but geography is geography, cities are there for a reason.
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 05:02 PM   #4646
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U.S. highways numbering runs from 1 to 101 on N-S axis and from 2 to 98 on W-E axis. Interestingly, U.S. 101 is still considered as a two-digit highway (10 counting as a single digit).
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 11:31 PM   #4647
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Wow, I had no idea. I always thought it was a far off "spur" of U.S. 1.
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 11:32 PM   #4648
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Another weird thing is US 400 in Kansas as there is no US 00.
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 11:37 PM   #4649
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100 Most Congested Roadway Segments in Texas

http://apps.dot.state.tx.us/apps/rider56/list.htm
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 11:52 PM   #4650
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I supose with such a large amount of roads it's hard for all of them to be "correctly" numberd.
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 07:29 AM   #4651
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J N Winkler View Post
Quite a lot. Funding distributions, the highway planning process, the role of MPOs and federal government agencies like EPA and USACE, etc. Even at the level of highway trivia, there are things like numbering patterns in various states, the distinction between primary and secondary state highway systems in some states, variations in signing practices (which in turn are related to subtleties in how the MUTCD is formulated and the presence or absence of state supplements or own-state replacements for it), etc. There are similar complexities everywhere (Spain and France come to mind), but they are only just now starting to be discovered and discussed since those countries have lagged the US in putting their road-related materials online.

Specialized discussion of US road issues hardly ever happens on SkyscraperCity--there just isn't the knowledge base for it here. The Usenet newsgroup misc.transport.road has historically had a lot of in-depth discussion (and is accessible through Google Groups), and the AARoads forum is increasingly becoming a popular place for it as well. There are country-based forums now which achieve a similarly high level of specialization for countries or regions outside the US (SABRE for the UK, SARA for France, Wegenforum.nl for the Low Countries, etc.).

In Minnesota the numbering system is complicated and doesn't make a lot of sense. This is because some of the system is written directly into our state constitution while the rest was approved by the legislature.

The trunk highway system of 70 routes was approved by referendum in 1920. When the U.S. Highway system was created, many of the U.S. Highways ran concurrently with state routes... but rather than take down the state routes, no effort was made so you had a lot of duplications. This happens today with U.S. Interstates that run along old U.S. Highway paths. Interstate 94 through most of Minnesota is signed as both 94 and U.S 52. The difference is that since parts of U.S 52 still exist, it would be stupid to fracture the highway by removing signage where interstates now run concurrently with them.

So, in Minnesota you have:

U.S. Interstate Highways: Paid for and regulated by the federal government, but maintained by the state of Minnesota.

U.S. Highways: There is less regulation with U.S. Highways and they vary from controlled access freeways to simple 2 lane rural highways. The U.S. Highways around where I live (71 and 2) have been upgraded in recent years to include lefthand turn lanes, widened shoulders, rumble strips, and an increased speed limit to 60mph on rural 2 lane portions (65 on divided 4 lane portions).

State Highways: Paid for and maintained by the state. Again, these vary much like the U.S. highways from controlled access freeways (Highway 100 or the Crosstown (MN 62)) to narrower 2 lane roads with gravel shoulders.

County State-Aid-Highways: These are special highways that the county proposes to the state that are then funded by the state based on criteria of traffic flow and the road's ability to connect communities/markets. They are maintained by the county. Usually they are improved 2 lane highways with paved shoulders.

County Roads: Funded and maintained by the county. Speed limits vary but are usually either unmarked (55mph) or are marked at 55mph. Since these roads aren't improved as much as state funded roads, they have sharp curves and more hills, so suggested slower speeds are often posted at sharp corners.

City streets/township roads: Are funded by either the city or township through its property taxing authority. They are often maintained either by the city or by the county. My township, for example, contracts out to the county for plowing and sanding in winter time.

There are also forest service roads that are minimally maintained roads in state and national forests. These are not meant for through traffic, but for maintenance/stewardship of the forests and for recreation.

Each level of roads can be funded by other sources. For example, a street resurfacing in my city was upgraded because of federal stimulus money and was completely torn up with new utility pipes put in underneath with new sidewalks, curbs, and storm drains.

Federal stimulus money also paid for applying rumble strips to all busier county highways.

Another example is the complete reconstruction of the main road through our city which is a state highway. While the state provided the bulk of the money, the county, city, soil and water conservation district, and even donations helped pay to completely redesign and beautify the roadway.

The road runs on an isthmus between two lakes that our city is situated on. Originally it was just an undivided four-lane road running right along the shore of Lake Bemidji. The old road (which had been replaced by the newer one in the 1960s) ran on the other side with businesses in between.

The project included rebuilding the bridge (a standard bridge before) into a two-span mock stone suspension type bridge with river stones on the outside. The road then splits up with two lanes per direction.. one following the original roadway (westbound) and the new eastbound following the old road that had been replaced in the 1960s.

The shrinking of the roadway on the Lake Bemidji side allowed for a wider space between the road and the lake. Large bike/walking paths have been constructed on both sides now with the oldest bridge constructed in the 1910s now closed to car traffic.

The Soil and Water conservation district came in and reconstructed teh shoreline to prevent erosion and planted native grasses, shrubs, and trees along the shore to help with erosion as well. In the islands where the road splits up and reconverges, they planted flowers, shrubs, and trees (including disease resistant elms).

The road is also curvier now and a bit narrower. It is meant to slow drivers down as they enter the city.

Here is a picture of the result.. (sorry, it's not the best picture.. but hey, what can you do?)

http://www.freeberggrund.com/images/.../TH197%203.jpg

edit: the picture is too big and I can't figure out how to resize it. Just click the link.
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 12:05 PM   #4652
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Speaking of Numbering. I always of the opinion that when Corridor X is finally complete I was assuming that I would be numbered as I-30 that would duplex I-40 from Little Rock to Memphis, than split to have I-30 to run to Birmingham. How did the feds come up with I-22??
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 12:15 PM   #4653
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hi guys..
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 12:24 PM   #4654
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I-22 won't connect with I-40 directly. It will start near the edge of Memphis at the future I-269 beltway. I personally am not a fan of such long multiplexes. I-22 is not a violation of the numbering system, as it is north of I-20 and south of I-40.
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 02:28 PM   #4655
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Quote:
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I-22 won't connect with I-40 directly. It will start near the edge of Memphis at the future I-269 beltway. I personally am not a fan of such long multiplexes. I-22 is not a violation of the numbering system, as it is north of I-20 and south of I-40.
Yeah I understand that its compliant with the interstate numbering system, and I did forget that it will not connect with I-40 directly. I guess the #22 is just as good as any.

Multiplexes are not all bad, I live about 3 miles from an interstate that is a multiplex for about 150 miles. Cant tell you why that was the case, but I did hear sometime ago that I-20 was originally routed that would split from I-59 near Tuscaloosa and basically run through Columbus, MS, Greenville, MS and El Dorado, AR. Basically along the US 82 corridor.
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 06:37 PM   #4656
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Here's my thoughts;

Maybe I-20 was originally routed via Meridian - Montgomery - Columbus - Macon - Savannah.
I-22 could've served Memphis - Birmingham - Atlanta - Greenville - Florence.

Savannah would make more sense for the I-20 terminus than the small city of Florence.
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Old September 3rd, 2009, 07:37 PM   #4657
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I've thought about that scenario, but instead of I-22, it should be an extension of I-30 considering the size of cities it serves.
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Old September 5th, 2009, 01:51 AM   #4658
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One of the major stack interchanges in Detroit, M-39 (Southfield Fwy) and I-94 (Jeffries Fwy).







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Old September 5th, 2009, 08:18 AM   #4659
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Here's my thoughts;

Maybe I-20 was originally routed via Meridian - Montgomery - Columbus - Macon - Savannah.
I-22 could've served Memphis - Birmingham - Atlanta - Greenville - Florence.

Savannah would make more sense for the I-20 terminus than the small city of Florence.
They DEFINITELY wanted an I-x0 running through Atlanta.

Reason being:

Interstates that end in 0 and 5 are principal routes that go through major cities, many of them cross-country (e.g. I-10 through Los Angeles, Phoenix, San Antonio, Houston, New Orleans, Mobile, Tallahassee, and Jacksonville; I-95 through Portland [ME], Boston, Providence, New York, Philadelphia, Wilmington, Baltimore, Washington DC, Richmond, Jacksonville, and Miami).

There are a few, such as I-45 and I-85 that were never designed to be that long, but their sheer importance (I-45 through Dallas, Houston, and to Galveston and I-85 through Petersburg, Durham, Greensboro, Charlotte, Greenville/Spartanburg, Atlanta, and Montgomery) meant that they were deserving of I-x5 denominations.
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Old September 6th, 2009, 08:44 AM   #4660
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Interstate 35 Northbound in Kansas

From Flickr (OKRoads)

image hosted on flickr
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