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Old October 13th, 2009, 12:02 PM   #4801
matty89
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Yep they did. Also many of our motorways are being upgraded (Gateway & Ipswich Motorways and Centenary Highway) plus 2 tunnels at the moment.

Like someone else said on this site, - Brisbane is a construction site at the moment.
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Old October 13th, 2009, 01:34 PM   #4802
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That was the old New Jersey Turnpike Western Spur Toll Gate....
This is the new one, built in 2000-2001 i think , i'm quiet sure on that though


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Old October 13th, 2009, 01:53 PM   #4803
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Cash tolls are something of the past anyway. Texas has planned to reconstruct all cash toll plazas into Zipcash or TollTags.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 05:37 AM   #4804
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E-ZPass lol.

FasTrak FTW.

Although I agree, too much concrete.I think that's the main reason why our freeways look more crappy than they actually are.Concrete is just plain ugly.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 06:25 AM   #4805
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V22 Osprey View Post
Although I agree, too much concrete.I think that's the main reason why our freeways look more crappy than they actually are.Concrete is just plain ugly.
The problem with concrete is not only that it is ugly. Concrete is designed to last longer than asphalt, significantly longer. When asphalt reaches its age limits, suddenly a lot of potholes and cracks appear, so the state governments are forced to deal with this. In case of concrete, it degrades much slowly with time, so often the states are not willing to spend money on it right away, instead waiting for up to several decades before dealing with it. This was (still is?) the case with I-80 in California near Nevada border. I posted pictures of the huge cracks on that motorway back in 2007. When you drive on that stretch of I-80, you literally become concerned for the well-being of your suspension. Honestly, I have only seen this bad situation in my home country of Ukraine/Russia. In my opinion, it is unacceptable. I don't care what they do - raise taxes or charge toll, but fix this damn thing!

American public is against fuel taxes, but at the same time they want well-maintained highways. Well, you can't have it both ways.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 06:57 AM   #4806
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Well no one wants to get charged taxes, number one. Two, gas prices are already as high as it is, the government starts charging fuel taxes then there will be no one left to use the freeways in the first place, as no one will drive their car anymore, and then if no one is driving anymore, why maintain the freeways?I dunno, you Europeans paying $7 bucks per gallon is insane.**** that.I would definitely stop driving and take a train/bus by that point or get an alternative fuel car.Also, I doubt any American is willing to pay nearly 10 bucks a gallon just to make freeways look prettier.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 07:26 AM   #4807
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V22 Osprey View Post
Well no one wants to get charged taxes, number one. Two, gas prices are already as high as it is, the government starts charging fuel taxes then there will be no one left to use the freeways in the first place, as no one will drive their car anymore, and then if no one is driving anymore, why maintain the freeways?I dunno, you Europeans paying $7 bucks per gallon is insane.**** that.I would definitely stop driving and take a train/bus by that point or get an alternative fuel car.Also, I doubt any American is willing to pay nearly 10 bucks a gallon just to make freeways look prettier.
I don't think you're getting the point. The amount of tax dollars that the U.S. has been receiving is inadequate for the amount of roads that we are trying to maintain. Do you really think we can sustain our highway network?

And the other side is to tax fuel so people will stop driving their cars, so we'll have more funds for public transportation, which we lack. And because less people will be using the cars, we don't have to focus as much on highway expansion, but rather highway maintenance.

Higher tax = more funds
Higher tax = less cars
More funds = higher-quality maintenance and construction
Less cars = less wear and tear for the highway
Less cars = less capacity needed,
less capacity = lower maintenance costs
Lower maintenance costs = more funds for public transport

And so on...
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Old October 14th, 2009, 07:39 AM   #4808
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAWC1506 View Post
I don't think you're getting the point.
I'm pretty sure I got the point.Higher gas taxes is good.

Quote:
The amount of tax dollars that the U.S. has been receiving is inadequate for the amount of roads that we are trying to maintain.
No Shit, Sherlock.

Quote:
Do you really think we can sustain our highway network?
Our roads are still standing aren't they?

Quote:
And the other side is to tax fuel so people will stop driving their cars, so we'll have more funds for public transportation, which we lack. And because less people will be using the cars, we don't have to focus as much on highway expansion, but rather highway maintenance.
Woah.I don't know about you, but I like being able to choose when and more importantly where I want to go.Can't do that with a train or bus.Instead I have to stand out in cold for an hour.**** that.


Quote:
Higher tax = more funds
Higher tax = less cars
More funds = higher-quality maintenance and construction
Less cars = less wear and tear for the highway
Less cars = less capacity needed,
less capacity = lower maintenance costs
Lower maintenance costs = more funds for public transport

And so on...
I understand that, and good points.Sometimes taking public transportation is indeed better than taking a car (*cough* Downtown LA *cough*) but if I'm going to visit someone or go to the store I'm not going through the bullshit of taking a bus.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 07:47 AM   #4809
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V22 Osprey View Post
I'm pretty sure I got the point.Higher gas taxes is good.


No Shit, Sherlock.


Our roads are still standing aren't they?


Woah.I don't know about you, but I like being able to choose when and more importantly where I want to go.Can't do that with a train or bus.Instead I have to stand out in cold for an hour.**** that.



I understand that, and good points.Sometimes taking public transportation is indeed better than taking a car (*cough* Downtown LA *cough*) but if I'm going to visit someone or go to the store I'm not going through the bullshit of taking a bus.
Our roads are standing, but they're on the verge of collapsing. By the time they do disintegrate, we'll be all screwed because one, we won't have roads that are safe to drive on, and two, we won't have the money to pay for it. The proper way to maintain highways isn't to wait until everything falls apart and redoing it. It's to always maintain it in good condition so it never gets to the point of disintegrating.

Then, obviously there is some animosity towards public transportation. Not your fault, not anyone's fault, but it's a mindset that have been engraved into Americans because of the way our cities are developed. The truth is that we are too spread out, and the amount of cars you see on the road, even in suburbs, prove that.

Transit will generate demand for transit-oriented developments, where people will begin to move towards city centers. That is the only way we can decrease sprawl and increase activities within the central business district.

And please watch the language. This isn't MySpace.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 07:50 AM   #4810
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Let me quote Barney Frank: "Trying to have a conversation with you would be like arguing with a dining room table. I have no interest in doing it." For a newbie with only 7 posts, you have quite an attitude.

Hawc, don't feed the troll.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 07:54 AM   #4811
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
Let me quote Barney Frank: "Trying to have a conversation with you would be like arguing with a dining room table. I have no interest in doing it." For a newbie with only 7 posts, you have quite an attitude.

Hawc, don't feed the troll.
Yes sir!
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Old October 14th, 2009, 12:08 PM   #4812
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Originally Posted by HAWC1506 View Post
And the other side is to tax fuel so people will stop driving their cars, so we'll have more funds for public transportation, which we lack.
Actually, in countries like ours, public transport is financed by about 30% in ticket sales, and 70% from other sources, like fuel tax or real estate. With people driving less, there's less tax money for public transport. Ticket fares are too low to cover the cost. Why do you think New York's bridges are still tolled like crazy?

I also doubt about the amount of people not driving because of a higher fuel tax. If you suddenly increase the gas price from $ 2.5 to $ 7, yes that may happen, but since no politician would ever do that, they will go for the gradual increase, say $ 0.25 per year. People just adjust their budget to it.

But I guess we need another major bridge to collapse in other to get the politicians attentions...
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Old October 14th, 2009, 07:32 PM   #4813
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Hiking US fuel taxes to European levels is a strawman anyway--nobody is seriously proposing to do that, aside from the New York Times editorial page. The blue-ribbon commission on transportation funding (convened by USDOT in the waning days of the Bush administration) recommended tripling the federal motor fuel tax, which would raise the federal component of motor taxation from about 18c/gallon to about 54c/gallon.

Assuming matching rises from the states, this would take the overall motor fuel tax burden from about 30c-50c/gallon to about 90c-$1.40/gallon. This is not large compared to a current price of about $2/gallon (or higher, depending on reformulation requirements in some states) neat of tax, or $4/gallon (also neat of tax) in the summer of 2008.

This is the upper bound of plausibility. The increases that get discussed, and get passed, in individual state legislatures tend to be much smaller--typically on the order of 5c/gallon (cf. Washington State's "nickel tax"). The federal tax itself hasn't been increased since 1993.

There are some not completely unreasonable arguments against raising the fuel tax. An increase could, for example, fuel further construction inflation, particularly if not phased in in an optimal way. But at some stage we are going to have to wake up to the fact that tolls won't make up the difference--toll-viable corridors are limited--and ordinary upkeep of the highways isn't really an optional activity.
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Old October 14th, 2009, 08:37 PM   #4814
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I don't want to play devil's advocate, but rising gas taxes doesn't always mean better roads.
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Old October 15th, 2009, 01:41 AM   #4815
V22 Osprey
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I'm not trying to be a troll.I'm just telling my side of things.

Also, yes I only have 7 posts.I assume I'm suppose to be quiet in background just because I'm new.Anyone's opinion is just as important as the dude with the 2,000 posts.

Anyway, new topic.

Does anyone have any pics of the California 60/91/ I-215 interchange?It looks really nice.
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Old October 15th, 2009, 02:27 AM   #4816
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Actually, in countries like ours, public transport is financed by about 30% in ticket sales, and 70% from other sources, like fuel tax or real estate. With people driving less, there's less tax money for public transport. Ticket fares are too low to cover the cost. Why do you think New York's bridges are still tolled like crazy?

I also doubt about the amount of people not driving because of a higher fuel tax. If you suddenly increase the gas price from $ 2.5 to $ 7, yes that may happen, but since no politician would ever do that, they will go for the gradual increase, say $ 0.25 per year. People just adjust their budget to it.

But I guess we need another major bridge to collapse in other to get the politicians attentions...
Sometimes I think so too. The collapse of the I-35 bridge got a lot of people talking, but having short-term memory, people just forgot about it. At least there's the stimulus now.
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Old October 15th, 2009, 02:40 AM   #4817
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Sometimes I think so too. The collapse of the I-35 bridge got a lot of people talking, but having short-term memory, people just forgot about it. At least there's the stimulus now.
In Michigan, which has never in the history of the world been accused of having "good roads", the DOT here actually does give priority to rebuilding bridges and overpasses over pretty much everything else.
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Old October 15th, 2009, 08:03 AM   #4818
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That's good to know. I'm just a little worried about the maintance of those structures once it's been built. But I guess the poor quality is due more to weather than engineering problems right?

Btw, Active Traffic Management like in the Netherlands/Britain/Germany is included in this rendering of SR 520 in Washington.

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Old October 16th, 2009, 03:41 AM   #4819
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Btw, Active Traffic Management like in the Netherlands/Britain/Germany is included in this rendering of SR 520 in Washington.
This ATM should help the Seattle area with never-ending traffic jams and accidents that happen just because people do not pay enough attention to the traffic around them
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Old October 16th, 2009, 04:38 AM   #4820
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This ATM should help the Seattle area with never-ending traffic jams and accidents that happen just because people do not pay enough attention to the traffic around them
Yeah, these will be installed on the "beltway" around Lake Washington, which is a square made up of I-90, SR 520, I-5 and I-405. Not really a beltway since it's not one highway, but close enough I guess.

The problem now is how to enforce it, since Americans are generally opposed to any type of automatic enforcement.

I had a chance to talk with a WSDOT engineer and he said that there is so much politics involved in projects these days that the best engineering option isn't always selected. The original I-5 proposed by engineers was supposed to go around Seattle, rather than through it, but of course politicians decided otherwise...

Then I mentioned keep right except to pass, and he said that highways are now designed to compensate for people who don't follow the rules, and that's part of the reason why lanes on highways are generally taken away from the right rather than from the left, a great amount of people cruise in the left lane compared to the right...
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