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Old October 16th, 2009, 05:03 AM   #4821
pwalker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAWC1506 View Post
Yeah, these will be installed on the "beltway" around Lake Washington, which is a square made up of I-90, SR 520, I-5 and I-405. Not really a beltway since it's not one highway, but close enough I guess.

The problem now is how to enforce it, since Americans are generally opposed to any type of automatic enforcement.

I had a chance to talk with a WSDOT engineer and he said that there is so much politics involved in projects these days that the best engineering option isn't always selected. The original I-5 proposed by engineers was supposed to go around Seattle, rather than through it, but of course politicians decided otherwise...

Then I mentioned keep right except to pass, and he said that highways are now designed to compensate for people who don't follow the rules, and that's part of the reason why lanes on highways are generally taken away from the right rather than from the left, a great amount of people cruise in the left lane compared to the right...
That's interesting, and the first time I've heard that. But, if you take a lane away from the right, how does that encourage those abusing the left lane to change their behavior? It would seem the opposite...if you are "riding" the left lane, and a right lane goes away, it would seem human nature would have that left lane rider stay right where they are. What am I missing here?
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Old October 16th, 2009, 05:13 AM   #4822
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pwalker View Post
That's interesting, and the first time I've heard that. But, if you take a lane away from the right, how does that encourage those abusing the left lane to change their behavior? It would seem the opposite...if you are "riding" the left lane, and a right lane goes away, it would seem human nature would have that left lane rider stay right where they are. What am I missing here?
Well the way they're thinking about it is to take a lane that would have a lower amount of cruising traffic, in order to minimize merging. Since exits are normally on the right, and most people don't cruise on the right lane anyway, the impact to cruising traffic would be less if you take away the right lane than if you take away the left lane.

But I agree, all it does is encourage people to not follow lane discipline. There's no reason why engineers should have to compensate for drivers who are not following the law. The best practice is to work with the law, rather than bending it.
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Old October 17th, 2009, 03:08 AM   #4823
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Yeah, we need more Americans over here

The most basic form of the American road system is not that hard to understand; Interstate Highways/US Highways -> State Routes -> County Routes (or equivalent). The numbering patterns of Interstates and US Highways are also not really hard to understand; even numbers run west-east, odd numbers run south-north. They increase from west to east for I-routes and east to west for US routes.

State Routes are more different, I usually cannot find any patterns, zoning or other system, so they tend to be randomly assigned. The numbers can be reused in every state, but there are usually no US/I/SR numbers with the same number. If there is a US 50, there isn't a SR 50 or I-50 in the same state.

Another interesting thing is that not only Interstate Highways are freeways, but US Highways and State Routes can be designed as freeways too. Some roads have a somewhat lower design standard, but can still be considered freeway (equivalents). Some freeways are even unnumbered, like the many Parkways in the greater New York area, which only have a reference number. In other states, like Georgia, US and I-routes also have a reference State Route number. In areas like Los Angeles or San Francisco, State Route freeways are just as important as Interstate Highways.
Texas seems to reuse numbers for different classes. Like There is an Interstate 35, Texas 35 and F.M. 35:


[IMG]http://i35.************/jl5quo.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i37.************/11lr7tg.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i36.************/288a8n8.jpg[/IMG]


I know this is an "old" post I'm quoting but it looked fun to point out a Texas example....
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Old October 17th, 2009, 03:40 AM   #4824
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i hate that my country's highways are not like these.
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Old October 17th, 2009, 07:00 PM   #4825
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
Texas seems to reuse numbers for different classes. Like There is an Interstate 35, Texas 35 and F.M. 35:
I don't know wether thats normal in the US, but that's very normal in Europe.
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Old October 17th, 2009, 07:15 PM   #4826
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post
I don't know wether thats normal in the US, but that's very normal in Europe.
Most states try not to do that in order to avoid confusion for both drivers and administrators. In a large state like Texas or in European countries with fully contiguous numbering schemes reusing numbers may be necessary.
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Old October 17th, 2009, 08:04 PM   #4827
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ir desi View Post
Most states try not to do that in order to avoid confusion for both drivers and administrators. In a large state like Texas or in European countries with fully contiguous numbering schemes reusing numbers may be necessary.
The numbering of Interstates tried to avoid having the same Interstate and US highway number in the same state. When I-24 was extended from Nashville into southern Illinois it violated that rule, though it likely causes little confusion since the two never come close to each other.

In Georgia, though, there's some confusion over GA 20 and I-20 since they cross. And there's GA 85 and I-85. They don't cross, but they both branch off of I-75 south of Atlanta, and for a long time GA 85 was the main route to Columbus. If you're giving directions from Atlanta to anywhere on GA 85, it's best to clarify that I-85 isn't the 'highway' to take.

Oh, on an unrelated topic, this reminds me...
[img]http://i37.************/11lr7tg.jpg[/img]

Clearview signage has been installed on Green I-85 in Spartanburg, SC.
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Old October 17th, 2009, 09:09 PM   #4828
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ir desi View Post
Most states try not to do that in order to avoid confusion for both drivers and administrators.
As far as I know, that only counts for Interstate Highways, U.S. Routes and State Highways.

FM roads are another class below State Highways. (more or less like County Routes).
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Old October 18th, 2009, 05:57 AM   #4829
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
As far as I know, that only counts for Interstate Highways, U.S. Routes and State Highways.

FM roads are another class below State Highways. (more or less like County Routes).
FM roads in Texas = "farm to market"

However, many have developed well beyond that classificiation.
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Old October 18th, 2009, 08:38 PM   #4830
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
As far as I know, that only counts for Interstate Highways, U.S. Routes and State Highways.
It is up to the individual state whether it designs its route numbering system to avoid conflicts. The numbering grids for Interstates and US highways are oriented oppositely to minimize the numbering conflicts that would otherwise arise naturally, but the states are under no special obligation to prevent them. Many, like Texas, choose not to, while others, like California, allow the same number to be in multiple systems as long as the number belongs to a continuous route. Hence, California has I-110 continuing as SR 110, I-15 continuing as SR 15, etc. From California's perspective, I-110 and SR 110 are both part of Route 110.

Quote:
FM roads are another class below State Highways. (More or less like County Routes.)
North of Dallas, US 75 has exits for both SH 121 and FM 121. The FM 121 exit is further to the north and has a special sign advising traffic not to exit for DFW Airport, which is reached via SH 121.
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Old October 19th, 2009, 12:34 PM   #4831
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I took a big trip yesterday ,drove around Central / Northern Jersey

US 206 South crossing I-95 in Trenton,New Jersey


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I-95 South

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I-95 South @ US 1 in Trenton

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Crossing the Northeast Corridor I-295 South

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Interstate Art

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I-295 South

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Approaching my Exit

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Exiting I-295 South to I-195 East

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The Ramp to I-195 East

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I-195 East in Central Jersey

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Exiting to the NJ Turnpike

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Toll Gate

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To be Continued .........

~Corey
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Last edited by Nexis; April 5th, 2010 at 10:49 PM.
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Old October 21st, 2009, 02:49 AM   #4832
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Continuing on New Jersey Turnpike North To Newark/New York

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Exit 8 to NJ 33 : Freehold / Hightstown

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Dutch

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Turnpike Split

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The Car lanes North
Exit 8A : Jamesburg / Cranbury


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Joyce Kilmer Service Plaza

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Service Plaza slip road entrance to NJTPK

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East Brunswick,NJ Hotels and Conference Center

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Exit 9 : East Brunswick / New Brunswick / Rutgers University

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Crossing the Raritan River : looking south

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Exit 10 : Perth Amboy / Edison Twp. / Metuchen / Staten Island / Woodbridge / I-287 North / NJ 440 East

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Triple Decker Bridge , Second Level is the Garden State Parkway , Third is Main Street in Woodbridge

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The Toll Gate for the Exit

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North Jersey Coastal Line Crossing the NJTPK

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Grover Cleveland Service Plaza

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Exit 12 : Carteret / Rahway / Linden , connections to US 1/9

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The Industrial Sector of NJ, keeps the Gas Prices low

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Exit 13 to Staten Island / Elizabeth,NJ

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I-278 / Goethals Bridge to Staten Island

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Exit 13A to Newark Liberty In't Airport / Port Newark / Elizabeth / Jersey Gardens Mall Complex

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Newark Skyline & Airport

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Elizabeth Center Super IKEA

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A plane landing at EWR

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Cranes @ Port Newark

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Exit 14 to Newark / EWR / Newark Seaport, Exit 14A to Bayonne , Exit 14B to Liberty State Park , Exit 14C to Jersey City

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I-78 : Newark Bay Bridge

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Entering the Western Spur of the NJTPK

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The Pulaski Skyway

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New York City / Gold Coast of NJ skylines

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New Jersey Meadowlands "A New Jersey Hidden Gem"

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Exit 15W Toll Gate

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Thats it for now, i'm still not done yet

~Corey
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Last edited by Nexis; April 5th, 2010 at 10:54 PM.
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Old October 21st, 2009, 09:04 AM   #4833
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Thanks!

That part of the Turnpike (and some other roads in the Newark area) always reminds me of Italy. This could easily be the A4 in Italy:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis
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Old October 21st, 2009, 02:03 PM   #4834
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Why does the turnpike have such thick lane marking (compared to other US roads)? Is there a reason?
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Old October 21st, 2009, 02:55 PM   #4835
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enkay View Post
Why does the turnpike have such thick lane marking (compared to other US roads)? Is there a reason?
I always feel like the NJ Turnpike was modeled after a German Autobahn.
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Old October 21st, 2009, 02:56 PM   #4836
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Something different:

Interstate 40 in New Mexico



or watch in HD!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5goTOoriLig
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Old October 21st, 2009, 03:15 PM   #4837
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I always feel like the NJ Turnpike was modeled after a German Autobahn.
It was built just after the end of WW2 , its a Euro Standard Hwy Network in NJ , i feel very safe on it compared to other Hwys, it has Electronic Warning signs every mile, and 10 ft wide shoulders the whole 122 mile Network. I'm Still not done yet,lol

I-280 in Kearny,NJ

Exit 17A to Jersey City

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Newark Skyline

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Morristown-Boonton-Gladstone-Montclair (electric) Lines <-----:----> Harrison,NJ

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Stickel Lift Bridge in Newark across the Passaic River

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The Ramp to Route 21 North , its currently being redone.

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The end for now:devil:

~Corey
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Old October 21st, 2009, 05:27 PM   #4838
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enkay View Post
Why does the turnpike have such thick lane marking (compared to other US roads)? Is there a reason?
The same reason why they do their own thing on the designs of their Big Green Signs - because they are the New Jersey Turnpike and they CAN.



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Old October 22nd, 2009, 04:01 AM   #4839
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enkay View Post
Why does the turnpike have such thick lane marking (compared to other US roads)? Is there a reason?
The visibility is very much improved. I wish all U.S. highways had thicker lane markings. 4 inches is simply inadequate, especially in adverse weather conditions.
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Old October 23rd, 2009, 02:59 AM   #4840
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This appeared in the IndyStar paper yesterday.


Daniels: I-69 will be half done by 2012

Associated Press

BOONVILLE, Ind. — Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels says the state plans to complete construction of the Interstate 69 extension between Evansville and the Crane Naval Surface Warfare Center by 2012, three years ahead of schedule.

He told the Evansville Courier & Press today that state highway officials also think that stretch of the highway can be built for the $700 million originally allotted because of plans to narrow medians, eliminate some interchanges and reduce pavement thickness.


The section between Evansville and Crane covers 68 miles, nearly half the full 142-mile route to Indianapolis.

The original cost of building the extension was set at $1.3 billion, including $700 million for the Evansville-to-Crane stretch. Cost estimates have since gone up to $3.1 billion.
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