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Old November 7th, 2009, 04:25 AM   #4901
WA
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Anyone know what this was, never was? It's Interstate 93 just north of Boston
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Old November 7th, 2009, 04:35 AM   #4902
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I'm guessing that ramp was constructed for the northern junction of I-695.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 09:57 AM   #4903
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
No, you are wrong. Chicago is a perfect example of freeway construction spurring suburban development. The construction of I-90 and I-88 west of Chicago resulted in MASSIVE sprawl and the rapid growth of independent cities like Aurora and sleepy farm towns like Naperville into major 100,000+ population cities.

Sprawl has closely followed these two freeway routes.
That doesn't explain the sprawl that's occurred in the western half of Lake County and McHenry County despite having no expressway or tollway in that quadrant of suburban Chicagoland. Many of the suburbs along I-88 and I-90 west of Chicago were already established thanks to the commuter rail lines, much the same way the Pacific Electric Lines allowed suburban communities in LA to establish themselves. Expressways and tollways do more to spur large employment centers than anything else, and suburban residential sprawl usually follows as a result of those employment centers.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 12:29 PM   #4904
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
No, you are wrong. Chicago is a perfect example of freeway construction spurring suburban development. The construction of I-90 and I-88 west of Chicago resulted in MASSIVE sprawl and the rapid growth of independent cities like Aurora and sleepy farm towns like Naperville into major 100,000+ population cities.

Sprawl has closely followed these two freeway routes.
Well, that's logic. If you have population growth, where do you develop it? In the middle of nowhere with NO infrastructure, or along existing freeways? However, Chicago did show it grew at other places with no freeways too. If there's no alternative, urban areas will continue to grow. Philadelphia and Atlanta are examples too, they have a lot of suburban areas that are far from freeways.

If you want no traffic growth, you either need huge unemployment (Wallonia, Ruhr) or a decimation of the population (world war III or emptying of cities (Rochester, NY, Buffalo, NY etc).
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Old November 7th, 2009, 12:48 PM   #4905
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Yeah, well Houston is a 5.7 million metropolitan area, so a light rail line can be expected to draw some travelers. I think another rail lines to Uptown and the airport can also count on some traveler potential.

However, Houston is extremely large, and I don't think light rail are a solution for transportation in large parts of the city. Houston is a private transport-reliant city, and always will be, considering the layout and expansion of the city.
There are other cities that are built on similar models ...large spread out urban areas that rely on the private car as the main means of transport. In recent years though, we have seen that many of these areas, Los Angeles being one city where the car was thought to be king, change their attitude somewhat, and make progress with introducing light rail, intercity trains, suburban rail , subway, and improved buses. With the recent economic crisis, the price of gas in America surpassing the $4 a gallon mark, Americans countrywide are more opt to leave the car for other forms of reliable modes of transport.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 01:03 PM   #4906
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gas increased from $ 6 to $ 11 in the Netherlands last year and nobody drove less.
That driving-less-due-to-gas-price-increases is more wishfull thinking than reality. Or do you think people won't go to work anymore? The only way that happens is an economic recession (as a perfect example the current one that reduces congestion).
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Old November 7th, 2009, 01:34 PM   #4907
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For instance, in California, the unemployment rate is 12.2% of the total population. In Metropolitan Los Angeles, there are 17,776,000 people in the CSA. If 12.2% of those are unemployed, this means 2,169,000 less commuter trips. Back and forth, that is a traffic volume drop of 4.3 million vehicles per day! Now that's significant.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 02:03 PM   #4908
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
For instance, in California, the unemployment rate is 12.2% of the total population. In Metropolitan Los Angeles, there are 17,776,000 people in the CSA. If 12.2% of those are unemployed, this means 2,169,000 less commuter trips. Back and forth, that is a traffic volume drop of 4.3 million vehicles per day! Now that's significant.
That analysis is overly simple. For starters, I question whether Wikipedia is giving unemployment figures as percentages of total population--are there really so few retirees?

From the standpoint of traffic, what really matters is the difference between present unemployment and the lowest unemployment rate (usually computed as between 4% and 5%) that is associated with a stable labor market. Assuming the California statewide rate applies to the LA basin, this difference is 8% of whatever is counted as the population for purposes of compiling employment statistics. Not all of these people will be driving to work, since large segments of the LA population (think South Central) are dependent on bus transit. Moreover, being out of a job does not necessarily mean that a person stops driving. But because LA is full of freeways which operate at LOS E or F throughout much of the day, the reduced employment rate makes a dramatic difference in terms of hours per day of stop-and-go operation. (This is somewhat offset, though, if reduced employment translates to reduced bus patronage, which in turn can result in route closures or service cancellations which put more cars on the road. Many California transit providers, particularly in the Bay Area, have been forced to implement deep service cuts.)
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Old November 7th, 2009, 02:16 PM   #4909
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J N Winkler View Post
That analysis is overly simple.
Of course, it's like a cigar box calculation However, I didn't want to throw in too many figures.

Quote:
For starters, I question whether Wikipedia is giving unemployment figures as percentages of total population--are there really so few retirees?
I was actually wondering about that too, as far as I know, unemployment stats are usually given as a percentage of the working population, not total population.

Quote:
Assuming the California statewide rate applies to the LA basin,
Well, greater LA represents 50% of the California statewide rate.

Quote:
Not all of these people will be driving to work, since large segments of the LA population (think South Central) are dependent on bus transit.
About 90% drives to work (throw in some carpools too ). 10% uses other means of transport, usually the bus (PT usage in the U.S. and the Netherlands is actually not that different, but we use another mode; the bicycle)


Quote:
Moreover, being out of a job does not necessarily mean that a person stops driving.
No, that's why only included commuter trips

Quote:
But because LA is full of freeways which operate at LOS E or F throughout much of the day, the reduced employment rate makes a dramatic difference in terms of hours per day of stop-and-go operation.
I take it rush hours will especially narrow down. On some freeways in Los Angeles, congestion is occuring nearly all day, in other areas, only between 6 and 11 and between 3 and 7. This may narrow down, rush hours won't last as long as the extra capacity created by unemployment is now used by people who used to travel earlier or later during the rush, or by people who used alternate roads.

That last thing is also important to consider when widening or building a freeway. It creates different travel patterns in time and route. This is often underestimated.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 05:17 PM   #4910
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New section of interstate commissioned today (2009-11-07)

The existing PA 60 and US 22/30 freeway and tollway between I-80 at Sharon, PA and I-79 at Carnegie, PA (just outside of Pittsburgh, PA) is now 'I-376', with PennDOT crews making the signing changes this weekend.

I-279 from there eastward through the Fort Pitt Tunnel into downtown Pittsburgh was changed earlier this year.

See:
http://www.dot.state.pa.us/penndot/d...e?OpenDocument



Mike
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Old November 7th, 2009, 05:25 PM   #4911
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Oh that's nice. I-376 will be significantly longer now. It used to run only in the Pittsburgh urban area, but it now extends all the way to Sharon.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 10:20 PM   #4912
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I found some really interesting videos about Freeways in the US. The users are FreewayBrent and ScrewdUPClickV2. I don't know if you guys posted some of them before, but I will show some Interstate Highways in the San Antonio Area. It seems TxDOT really invested a lot of Money in the Loop 410 expansion to 8 and 10 lanes, and the New I-10, US-281 stacks and Bandera Road Ramps, I think they are just as massive as they could.

I-410 (TX), U.S. 90 To I-35


I-37 US-281 N



I-10


I-35
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Last edited by ManRegio; November 7th, 2009 at 11:05 PM.
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Old November 7th, 2009, 11:01 PM   #4913
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I love Texas highways except for the frontage roads
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Old November 8th, 2009, 12:26 AM   #4914
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FreewayBrent, lol. This genre has really taken off.
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Old November 8th, 2009, 09:39 AM   #4915
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Entering The PA Turnpike on my way home form my Cousins Farm in PA

image hosted on flickr


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Later after I-76 splits off to goes South , my camera Malfunctioned and produced Blurry Images.

Now on I-276 East


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


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Approaching the I-476 Interchange

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US 1 Interchange

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Delaware Bridge Toll Gate

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I'll post the rest later on Today

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Old November 9th, 2009, 07:19 AM   #4916
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Bummer the leaves are all gone. Was there this time last year, they were just blowing off the trees. It was pretty awesome.
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Old November 9th, 2009, 12:59 PM   #4917
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Popquiz; what's wrong about this picture?

http://www.aaroads.com/forum_images/...xit_034_01.jpg

(I don't think I can hotlink AAroads pics)
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Old November 9th, 2009, 02:52 PM   #4918
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Some freeways in Texas (at least portions of them) seem to be begging for repairs :
http://www.aaroads.com/texas/texas28..._us-290_eb.jpg
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Old November 9th, 2009, 05:27 PM   #4919
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Uhh... That is repaired. In Ohio they do a good job with patched roads which - though not pretty - drive just as smooth as a freshly paved one. Texas usually does a pretty good job with their roads.

America's continental climate is a lot more extreme than Europe's so don't go comparing European solutions with American ones.
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Old November 9th, 2009, 05:44 PM   #4920
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Yep, and besides that, the DOT funds are declining in purchasing power, so they can't afford to do much projects. That's why you see more and more toll roads.
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