daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old February 17th, 2010, 11:05 PM   #5281
Stuck in Bama
Registered User
 
Stuck in Bama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Greater Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 2772

This is what usually happens on TV when a county in this area goes under a tornado warning.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHj_5-Yz-20

Last edited by Stuck in Bama; February 17th, 2010 at 11:21 PM.
Stuck in Bama no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old February 18th, 2010, 08:13 AM   #5282
pwalker
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Native Seattleite
Posts: 1,438
Likes (Received): 66

The last two posts are quite accurate in what happens on US media during a tornado warning. The radio alert for Chicago is exactly how it sounds when the EAS (Emergency Alert System) kicks in.

The local tv coverage is also quite typical. Most stations will interupt regular programming to provide wall-to-wall coverage of impending tornados. While their coverage is there to protect people, the not-so-known aspect is that these stations want to "brand" themselves as the "weather leader", and that is another strong reason why they do this extensive coverage.
pwalker no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2010, 08:29 AM   #5283
xzmattzx
Philly sports fan
 
xzmattzx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Wilmington, Delaware
Posts: 15,646
Likes (Received): 4266

Quote:
Originally Posted by CptSchmidt View Post
It turns the overpass into a concentrated wind tunnel. I think this video shot by a news screw is what fuelled the idea that an overpass is a good place to hide.



They were very lucky to have survived. VERY lucky.
Yes, as stated by a few people already, overpasses are very bad places to take shelter. Tornados are systems of low pressure, and so the higher and deeper you get into a tornado, the higher the winds are. If you are out in the open when a tornado hits, you want to be as low on the ground/in elevation as possible, because the winds are lowest there. That is your best chance of not getting picked up by the winds.
xzmattzx está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2010, 08:35 AM   #5284
mgk920
Nonhyphenated-American
 
mgk920's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Appleton, WI USA
Posts: 2,583
Likes (Received): 68

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post
And here is a recording of an actual tornado warning alert on TV - locations given are close-in west and northwest Chicago suburbs and neighborhoods across the city's north side and into the downtown area.



Mike
Meanwhile, that same tornado warning at Wrigley Field (it's in the Lakeview neighborhood, mentioned in the TV alert) during a Cubs game, complete with Chicago's sirens:



followed by:





NOW, back to the road!



Mike
mgk920 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 18th, 2010, 09:25 AM   #5285
Stuck in Bama
Registered User
 
Stuck in Bama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Greater Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 2772

I-20/59/US 11/AL 5 inbound around mile marker 101
Stuck in Bama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 04:06 AM   #5286
Tom 958
Registered User
 
Tom 958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: near Atlanta
Posts: 786
Likes (Received): 163

A good ladder and some green paint could make this sign really funny.

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=3...2,81.3,,0,2.49
Tom 958 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 06:28 AM   #5287
Stuck in Bama
Registered User
 
Stuck in Bama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Greater Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 2772

I-65 South at I-20/59
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&hq=&...64.12,,0,-7.95

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&hq=&...164.12,,0,7.95

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&hq=&...64.12,,0,-7.95
Stuck in Bama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 06:45 AM   #5288
Stuck in Bama
Registered User
 
Stuck in Bama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Greater Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 2772

Red Mountain Expressway
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&hq=&...12,180.82,,0,5
Stuck in Bama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 10:36 AM   #5289
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

Landslide on the Kellogg Interchange in Pomona, CA (suburb of Los Angeles).


Not to mention the 3rd world pavement they have there. Good excuse to repave this one. I bet this is the original pavement from the 1960's, and if it's not, they did a crappy job.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 11:30 AM   #5290
J N Winkler
Road enthusiast
 
J N Winkler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oxford
Posts: 265
Likes (Received): 1

"Third world pavement"? It looks beautiful! Look how meticulously the joints have been maintained. There is minimal slab cracking too.
J N Winkler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 12:27 PM   #5291
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

I Doubt they will repave , that whole hillside needs to be restablized before anything else happens ,which can take days , weeks , or months ....and by that time there will be no money left to repave. And that road probably isn't that bad. We have roads like that here, there not that badly cracked or have potholes.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 12:32 PM   #5292
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

Quote:
Originally Posted by J N Winkler View Post
"Third world pavement"? It looks beautiful! Look how meticulously the joints have been maintained. There is minimal slab cracking too.
Really? This is proper concrete pavement imo:
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 03:11 PM   #5293
Substructure
Registered User
 
Substructure's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 17,985
Likes (Received): 10238

I didn't know we were still using concrete for new highways in the EU...
Why didn't they choose regular asphalt instead ?
__________________

Substructure no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 03:16 PM   #5294
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

Concrete is still widely used in highway construction. But only for freeways, not for main roads.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 04:40 PM   #5295
J N Winkler
Road enthusiast
 
J N Winkler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oxford
Posts: 265
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Really? This is proper concrete pavement IMO:

It is also much newer than the concrete pavement in Diamond Bar shown above. I can't see joints, so it looks like CRCP, which means it will be really ugly and rough when a harsh winter causes blowouts: give the weather gods time. Dowelled JRCP FTW.
J N Winkler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 05:00 PM   #5296
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

I think it's CRCP as well (edit: I'm not sure if it's reinforced), but I like it more than those slabs with huge joints between them. Well, if I have to make a choice, I prefer asphalt. It needs more maintenance, but the acoustical and drainage characteristics are much better. Plus cracks can be repaved easier than concrete. Another political disadvantage of concrete is that it can easily be neglected because it detoriates very slowly. Road authorities are forced to replace an asphalt pavement much quicker.

Last edited by ChrisZwolle; February 19th, 2010 at 05:11 PM.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2010, 07:41 PM   #5297
J N Winkler
Road enthusiast
 
J N Winkler's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Oxford
Posts: 265
Likes (Received): 1

If it is continuous, then it is reinforced--the reinforcement is necessary to resist thermal expansion.

Your perspective on the concrete versus asphalt question is clearly conditioned by European practice, some elements of which are not followed in the US. European asphalt designs are more resistant to rutting and deformation than American ones--we don't use HRA and barely use SMA, for example. European highway agencies are also far more likely than their American counterparts to schedule some form of asphalt pavement maintenance (such as renewal of the top course) before rutting develops. Standards for subgrade CBR are in general higher and this allows European asphalt pavements to hold their surface geometry better.

There are some bad aspects to European practice with regard to asphalt pavements, such as the persistent tendency in Britain to use proprietary thin surfacing courses which break up after a heavy rainstorm, but on the whole Europeans have less to fear from their asphalt pavements than Americans do from theirs.

In the US, asphalt pavement is typically bad news during a heavy rainstorm because rutting can and does cause hydroplaning. There is less scope for open-grade surfacings because freeze-thaw cycles make it problematic to rely on rainwater percolating below the top layer of aggregate. As a result, in the US the conservative design is one that relies on water draining off the top of the pavement, without penetrating below the top aggregate layer, and that in turn means using a rigid material--concrete--which will resist rutting and hold its engineered crossfall over time. A well-drained concrete pavement is also pretty forgiving of undermaintenance.

Noise is governed by many variables and I have driven on some recently constructed instances of dowelled JRCP which were pretty quiet--I couldn't feel the transitions from slab to slab. We probably do have more of a problem with road spray, but IMO fixing it is not worth the risk of more asphalt pavement susceptible to rutting.
J N Winkler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2010, 02:06 AM   #5298
Rail Claimore
Registered User
 
Rail Claimore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 1,152
Likes (Received): 14

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Really? This is proper concrete pavement imo:
And typical on all new and rebuilt concrete roadways in the US. Practically the entire Illinois Tollway system around Chicago has concrete like that now thanks to rebuilding over the past 3 years.

Rail Claimore no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2010, 02:19 AM   #5299
dl3000
Registered User
 
dl3000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 418
Likes (Received): 10

Thats cool. My guess is JRCP is better suited to earthquake prone regions as well, at least compared to CRCP. Plus the low maintenance benefits are why JRCP is Caltrans' pavement of choice. Only instances I see asphalt are where there are several hotels adjacent to the road or dense residential areas. Im surprised the freeze thaw cycles aren't a major issue in Europe with the CRCP. I guess the mix designs are air entrained and all that.
__________________
"San Diego...drink it in, it always goes down smooth" - Ron Burgundy
dl3000 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2010, 09:14 AM   #5300
Cosmoboy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 75
Likes (Received): 1

The following is a video I took of I-85 in Charlotte, NC. I realize the quality isn't the best, but I'm hoping to upgrade to a Canon 7D soon. I, also, have other videos from NC on my YouTube account. Hope you enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuOdcXJTTFs
Cosmoboy no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
america, california, highway, highways, interstate, los angeles, united states, urban

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium