daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 1st, 2010, 06:34 PM   #5901
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

Quote:
Originally Posted by ttownfeen View Post
Jersey City has a remarkable skyline. Must suck to be overshadowed by New York City.
To be honest , New Yorkers actually respect us now with our skyline.

I took these pictures form the train.

NJ Turnpike Passaic River Bridge form Northeast Corridor

image hosted on flickr


NJ Turnpike 15X Interchange form the Concourse @ Secaucus JCT

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 1st, 2010, 08:31 PM   #5902
urbanlover
Living for the city
 
urbanlover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Detroit
Posts: 340
Likes (Received): 115

The new I-75, I-96 / Ambassdor Bridge interchange in Detroit. This was the single most expensive project in MDOT with all new interchange with the bridge and reconstructing the mainline and interchange with I-96


Bagley Ave. pedestrian bridge
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr



The new welcome center/rest area the first and only one in the city

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr



Looking north over SB I-75 mainline

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


The c/d lane for I-96
image hosted on flickr
urbanlover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2010, 09:01 PM   #5903
Penn's Woods
Deadpan Snarker
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 6,241
Likes (Received): 779

Talking of Michigan welcome centers, I've been seeing an astonishing amount of michigan.org commercials, for more than a year, that paint the state as heaven on earth. Any idea whether they're working, and any criticism of the expense? (Nothing at all against Michigan as a destination in this question, but they seem to be spending more money on certain cable channels than any other state in the Union by far lately.)
Penn's Woods no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2010, 11:59 PM   #5904
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

They have $$$ to fix up an Interstate , but not fix up there crumbling city? Weird.....
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 12:23 AM   #5905
I-275westcoastfl
Registered User
 
I-275westcoastfl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 6,146
Likes (Received): 790

It would take more money than we can imagine to bring back jobs to Michigan.
I-275westcoastfl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 01:35 AM   #5906
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

Quote:
Originally Posted by I-275westcoastfl View Post
It would take more money than we can imagine to bring back jobs to Michigan.
Still they can work harder. They should have used the $$$$ to demolish the abandoned buildings.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:44 AM   #5907
I-275westcoastfl
Registered User
 
I-275westcoastfl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 6,146
Likes (Received): 790

Thats a waste too as it would take a lot of money to get all of the buildings vs the fact nature will take care of many anyways. One day and I mean many many years from now Detroit will have a renaissance in pockets of the city that are nicer and the abandoned parts would have mostly collapsed and be hidden by nature. Right now there is too much of a crumbling city to fix but one day there will be either groups of manageable sized towns that will be feasible to fix. It's a shame that we will lose a large percent of the historic structures though.
I-275westcoastfl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:51 AM   #5908
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

They already started doing it in parts of the city.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:55 AM   #5909
I-275westcoastfl
Registered User
 
I-275westcoastfl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 6,146
Likes (Received): 790

I know because they realize the same thing, there is no chance of saving the whole city only certain parts.
I-275westcoastfl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:58 AM   #5910
Stuck in Bama
Registered User
 
Stuck in Bama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Greater Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 2772

Detroit is going through a period of transition, which is no easy task. Like any other metro in the Rust Belt they will have to be creative in how they attract new industry and people to the area. Improving transportation infrastructure is a good start.
Stuck in Bama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:59 AM   #5911
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

Quote:
Originally Posted by I-275westcoastfl View Post
I know because they realize the same thing, there is no chance of saving the whole city only certain parts.
Every city is doing , Newark did it , Camden plans on doing along with Baltimore , DC , New Haven , Hartford , Trenton ,etc. But projects like these make it appear as there sugar coating the cities problems.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 03:10 AM   #5912
Stuck in Bama
Registered User
 
Stuck in Bama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Greater Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 2772

More debate on the proposed Northern Beltline (I-422)


VIEWPOINTS: Let's build the Northern Beltline
Published: Sunday, August 01, 2010, 5:30 AM
Special to The Birmingham News
By RENEE CARTER

Lately, Birmingham metropolitan area residents have been subjected to a running debate about the future of transportation in this area.

Share Decisions made today about those projects -- highways, bridges, mass transit and the like -- will greatly affect the quality of life for our children and grandchildren as well as their ability to obtain well-paying jobs that will enable them to live productive lives here.

At issue is the advisability of constructing the Northern Beltline, a 52.5 mile interstate highway beginning at Interstate-20 in southwest Jefferson County and extending through northeast Jefferson County connecting to I-22, I-65 and I-59. The proposed beltline, to be designated I-422, would likely have the most significant economic impact of any economic development project in Alabama's history. That's a mouthful, but even conservative assumptions support that projection.

The Coalition for Regional Transportation is an organization formed to promote the development of the transportation system in and around the Birmingham and Jefferson County metropolitan area. CRT recently announced the results of a study it commissioned by the University of Alabama Center for Business and Economic Research that dramatically demonstrates I-422's impact:

+ A total economic impact during the 21-year construction phase of more than $7 billion.

+ Seventy thousand direct and indirect jobs created, half in the Birmingham metropolitan area.

+ Postconstruction impact of more than $2 billion annually.

+ New tax revenue of $155 million during construction and $54 million annually to local governments after construction.

+ Improvements in travel safety, travel time, air quality and traffic flow.

However, in spite of these staggering positive benefits, some continue to question the advisability of building the beltline. Their main argument seems to be twofold.

First, they say the dollars designated to be used for I-422 could be better used on other metro-area transportation projects. That reasoning illustrates a lack of understanding about the source of the funding. It should be clearly understood that the majority (80 percent) of the available funding is federal dollars from the Appalachian Regional Highway Program that by law can be used only for highway projects like I-422. If we don't use those funds here in Alabama on I-422, that money (our own tax dollars) will be used in other states and Jefferson County will lose its fair share once again.

Second, supporters of I-422 are accused of opposing mass transit. Nothing could be further from the truth. The CRT supports all viable transportation alternatives for this area. Beltline opponents say that projects like I-422 take dollars away from transit projects. Once again, a false argument. The fact is that at present there is no dedicated local funding available for mass transit. CRT supports other viable transportation options, but we need to take advantage of the funding that is available now -- or see those tax dollars build highways in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and other states.

And speaking of mass transit, it should be pointed out that even if Birmingham had the best mass transit system in the country, projects like I-422 would still be critical to this area's economy. Public transit, as important as it is, can't serve all needs. For instance, large quantities of manufactured goods and products cannot be moved by mass transit designed to move only people.

Finally, ask yourself these questions: Why is Birmingham virtually the only city in the Southeast that doesn't have an interconnected interstate route? If a fully connected interstate route is such a "negative," why is it the prevailing model around the country for economic growth and development? Why is it one of the greatest factors of success in cities of Birmingham's size that have thrived and prospered like Charlotte, Nashville, Jacksonville, Memphis and others?

As we all know, this area desperately needs economic growth. We all talk about it and what we can do to bring that needed growth, jobs and a better quality of life to our citizens. We also know that without an adequate transportation system -- including projects like the Northern Beltline -- that growth will almost certainly never come.

Now, we can do more than talk and wish -- we can all work together to make it a reality. It is ours for the taking.

Renee Carter is executive director of the Coalition for Regional Transportation, based in Birmingham. E-mail: [email protected].
Stuck in Bama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 03:14 AM   #5913
Stuck in Bama
Registered User
 
Stuck in Bama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Greater Birmingham, Alabama
Posts: 1,303
Likes (Received): 2772

Opposing view

VIEWPOINTS: Efficient transit is what we need
Published: Sunday, July 25, 2010, 5:35 AM
Special to The Birmingham News
By GIL ROGERS and KEITH JOHNSTON

Few decisions shape a community's future more than those involving transportation.

Share Planning the efficient flow of goods and people is vital to urban centers -- done well, it ensures a balance of economic growth and environmental protection; done poorly, it leads to unsustainable sprawl, traffic gridlock and deterioration of air and water quality.

Birmingham and surrounding communities can now position themselves to become models of sustainable growth; however, this cannot be obtained without proper transportation planning. If we mimic the ways of the past, such as building massive road projects without giving consideration to alternatives, Birmingham and surrounding areas will take a step backward.

The Alabama Department of Transportation, along with some business and development interests, are currently focusing on two expensive road projects that will create more problems than they solve. The first is the Northern Beltline. A 52.5-mile, $3 billion-plus project.

Beltways around cities were the reigning mindset in the 1950s and 1960s, and one need only look to our neighbor to the east, Atlanta, to see the resulting negative impacts a beltway can have. All of the economic growth from Atlanta's beltway occurred at the expense of the city itself. Development pushed farther and farther out, gridlock increased, air and water quality suffered, and existing infrastructure was neglected.

Building a new major interstate in north Birmingham -- in addition to what will soon be Interstate-22 to Memphis -- would further increase tailpipe emissions, harming air quality in an area already flirting with violation of the Clean Air Act. It would also negatively impact headwaters of the Cahaba and Black Warrior rivers, both of which serve as our drinking water supplies. The proposed beltline won't even connect with I-459 northeast of the city, providing limited congestion relief. We can find more effective ways to spend our transportation dollars.

The second proposal is the elevated tollway along a section of U.S. 280.

This project would widen 280 to 10 lanes through Mountain Brook and Homewood while adding an unsightly and potentially unsafe elevated road in Inverness. Everyone agrees that 280 has a traffic problem, but rather than addressing the root cause, ALDOT's proposal would push the problem farther out into Chelsea for another generation to face. In addition, elevated highways -- another outdated concept -- can siphon business away from existing shops and lead to blighted areas under the elevated highway. In fact, more localities in the U.S. are tearing down elevated highways than building new ones. Furthermore, it is not clear the U.S. 280 project will pay for itself even with a sizable toll. Alternatives to an elevated tollway on 280 exist, and these alternatives capitalize on existing infrastructure and spend less taxpayer money.

Both the Northern Beltline and ALDOT's U.S. 280 proposal represent billions of dollars in construction costs, materials and maintenance -- funds that will be unavailable for transportation investments elsewhere in the Birmingham metro area. Both projects would have profound impacts on our air and water resources, and both would derail sustainable development in our region.

Disturbingly, the Northern Beltline and the elevated U.S. 280 proposals are being presented as our only transportation options, which is simply false. Numerous opportunities exist in the metropolitan area to improve existing transportation infrastructure and expand public transit, while avoiding the negative impacts of these two massive projects. Regional transportation problems can be greatly relieved by upgrading road connections where they are cost-effective and make sense, improving secondary roads and access points, repairing existing roads and bridges, and broadening public transportation options, like bus and rail.

When it comes to transportation choices for the Birmingham metropolitan area, ALDOT and other interests are looking backward for solutions. We should learn from past mistakes here and elsewhere to make better decisions going forward. The cities that are attracting new businesses and innovation are providing modern transportation alternatives and improving the quality of life for residents. Large interstates and elevated highways are not the answer.

Gil Rogers and Keith Johnston are attorneys with the Southern Environmental Law Center, which opened a Birmingham office this summer. Website: www.SouthernEnvironment.org
Stuck in Bama no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 03:32 AM   #5914
I-275westcoastfl
Registered User
 
I-275westcoastfl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Bellevue, WA
Posts: 6,146
Likes (Received): 790

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Every city is doing , Newark did it , Camden plans on doing along with Baltimore , DC , New Haven , Hartford , Trenton ,etc. But projects like these make it appear as there sugar coating the cities problems.
In a way it is sugar coating they will keep people in the main areas while the rest rots. Detroit is a unique case because it used to be a large, fairly dense city that is shrinking at a fast rate, it will never return to previous levels. In my opinion its a unique city, the only kind like it on a large scale in the western world. This will be the first de-urbanized city in America, I really think the city will split into smaller cities. My prediction is that the city will shrink to 200,000-300,000 and the current metro will be down by about half the population. The good thing is work will return to Detroit in the form of agriculture through all the large land plots left by former parts of the city. As I said definitely will be an interesting thing to watch over our lifetimes. I look forward to stopping in Detroit on my road trip.
I-275westcoastfl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 06:54 AM   #5915
urbanlover
Living for the city
 
urbanlover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Detroit
Posts: 340
Likes (Received): 115

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
They have $$$ to fix up an Interstate , but not fix up there crumbling city? Weird.....
What's weird about fixing a road in need of work?
urbanlover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:45 PM   #5916
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,665
Likes (Received): 1261

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlover View Post
The new I-75, I-96 / Ambassdor Bridge interchange in Detroit. This was the single most expensive project in MDOT with all new interchange with the bridge and reconstructing the mainline and interchange with I-96


Bagley Ave. pedestrian bridge
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr



The new welcome center/rest area the first and only one in the city

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr



Looking north over SB I-75 mainline

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


The c/d lane for I-96
image hosted on flickr
What kind of road surface is the grooved concrete? Is there a name for that? They've been using that a lot in Michigan lately. They also used in Toledo for the I-280 reconstruction.
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:47 PM   #5917
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,665
Likes (Received): 1261

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Every city is doing , Newark did it , Camden plans on doing along with Baltimore , DC , New Haven , Hartford , Trenton ,etc. But projects like these make it appear as there sugar coating the cities problems.
Just stick to your NJTP pics. No one asked for your opinion on anything else.
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 03:30 PM   #5918
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddington View Post
Just stick to your NJTP pics. No one asked for your opinion on anything else.
Its a free forum , i'm allowed to my opinions. Clean up your cities and i wouldn't have anything nasty to say......meh i said the same on city data the detrioters on that forum agreed that this was a form of sugar coating.... Don't tell others they are not entitled to there own opinions , this is the US. Yes my state has bad cities , but in recent years they have all come back swinging except Camden but thats a different story.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section

Last edited by Nexis; August 2nd, 2010 at 03:43 PM.
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2010, 04:36 PM   #5919
sonysnob
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: North York
Posts: 963
Likes (Received): 860

^ I think that the gateway project is pretty neat. It will be nice to not immediately see drifters once off of the Ambassador Bridge heading to I-75 South, where there had previously not been a direct connection.

That said, I think Detroit needs to abandon a bit of its motor city history if it wants to prosper, instead embracing principals of the "new urbanism". A few light rail lines down some of the major corridors could breath new life into some of the 'main street' style businesses. It's a big if though -- some of Detroit is so far gone, that some areas just may never recover.
__________________
Asphaltplanet.ca
sonysnob está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 5th, 2010, 05:09 AM   #5920
ImBoredNow
I have no life : (
 
ImBoredNow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Frederick, Vellore
Posts: 1,332
Likes (Received): 192

Interstate 270 Runs from DC outskirts all the way up to northern MD. It is probably the most crowded in Maryland during peak hours.
My ride consisted from Frederick(northern MD) to Germantown going south bound.
Sorry, Having issues

Last edited by ImBoredNow; August 5th, 2010 at 05:20 AM.
ImBoredNow no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
america, california, highway, highways, interstate, los angeles, united states, urban

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium