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Old March 12th, 2011, 02:46 PM   #6581
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Out of curiosity: how much does such service cost in a regular US repair shop or service station nowadays?
I'm generally not familiar with pricing on car repair, but it's had some work done on it - a broken valve stem on the tire was fixed at no cost (a real shocker)...a new set of engine bushings cost $250 installed...tire rotation, $20.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 06:18 PM   #6582
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...For example the W-N and N-W connections on the I-35/I-670 interchange are missing. Also; the I-70/I-670 interchange in Kansas is also missing connections, plus I-35 has only 4 through lanes on the western loop of downtown KC.
Indeed. That's surely a big part of the reason why I-70 was left on its legacy route instead of being moved to the more-direct I-670 corridor. Imagine the difficulty of properly signing connections to and from other Interstates, especially considering the morass of non-Interstate route overlaps that already exists in downtown KC. Plus, designating the new route as I-670 enabled Interstate designations to be applied to the entire KC inner belt, which is always a bit of a challenge when an inner beltway carries only two through Interstates.

Also note that the western connection of I-70 and I-670 assigns priority to neither route-- I-670 exits I-70 from the left but enters from the right. I suspect that the authorities hadn't decided how to handle routings when the design was approved, though that's just a guess.

Between GPS and the familiarity of local drivers with their own road system, the number of drivers who choose the slightly-longer I-70 routing over the more-direct I-670 for a trip from Topeka to St. Louis will surely be very small.

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It's much better to demolish the entire industrial area at Kaw Point and turn it into a second CBD if necessary.
Yeah, with good light rail service!
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Old March 13th, 2011, 09:07 PM   #6583
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Originally Posted by Stuck in Bama View Post
These are not roads to nowhere, for example corridor X (I-22) will connect two mid-size metro areas in this region (Birmingham and Memphis). Again Southern states are also struggling with transportation budgets like anywhere else in the country.

This earmarked money cant just be spent on any road project. It has to qualify for the money.
Memphis and Birmingham were already connected by U.S. 78. Was an interstate connection really necessary?

What about building the northern leg of the Birmingham beltway? There is no traffic in that part of the county to warrant this road. What about extending I-85 through Selma to Meridian when U.S. 80 more than suffices? BOONDOGGLE.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 09:11 PM   #6584
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of the many opinions, arguments for or against, and written conversations on the subject of high speed rail in our country, one of the most sensible ones is made by nexis. the reality is that, while high speed rail might work well in the northeast, on the west coast, maybe in florida, and a very few additional places, i just don't understand these individuals who keep trying to push this concept for the nation. it is not fiscally responsible, the population in most areas fails miserably to justify such a thing, and it would be cost prohibitive for the average ridership. i don't see why these things aren't easily seen, and i have asked time and time again, who is it that is pushing this agenda throughout america? i could see the expansion of amtrak, and i would love to see the major cities of states connected via amtrak, and the return of the use of trains to travel to all parts of america through high speed rail. however, the cities that have light rail (because it looks cool, as i have been told on so many occasions) are having major difficulty filling seats. i don't know what the adr is in most of the smaller cities, such as slc, charlotte, for example, but cities like nashville, memphis, b'ham, and basically similarly sized cities could never justify the money spent on a major rail line connection to spend federal dollars and public money w/ such small metro populations.

i like the plan memphis has to put in light rail from the airport to downtown and tie it in to the downtown medical districts; however, to try to hook up the entire metropolitan area cannot be justified because of numbers and the unrealistic costs. currently, nashville, is trying to run something similar to an old coal burning or steam engine train (may be a prop from petticoat junction, lol) in order to appear that nashville is bringing in loads of people from the pastures---i think they are actually begging people to ride it---yet, again, these trains are obviously needed in areas where 8 to 13 million people are strung together, or where 3 to 7 million, etc exist. maybe, atlanta might qualify, houston, dallas-fort worth, but a definite lack of justification everywhere else, for both the money, the return, and so many other additional concerns.
Never mind this post being COMPLETELY off topic, but who in the Hell is promoting a nationwide HSR network? NO ONE. If mass transit is so unpopular, why are local tax increases overwhelmingly supported by the people to pay for increases transit services?

You built a straw man argument to justify your poorly punctuated rant.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 02:14 AM   #6585
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Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
Memphis and Birmingham were already connected by U.S. 78. Was an interstate connection really necessary?

What about building the northern leg of the Birmingham beltway? There is no traffic in that part of the county to warrant this road. What about extending I-85 through Selma to Meridian when U.S. 80 more than suffices? BOONDOGGLE.
Birmingham and Memphis, two metro areas with over a million people each, was connected by a high traffic, mostly two lane, US surface highway. Obviously a interstate connection was needed.

The I-85 extension is gonna spark development in the state's and probably one of the nation's poorest areas. The Northern Beltline would route mainly commercial truck traffic, etc around Birmingham.

What the need of the I-69 extention from Indianapolis to Evansville?. Is there enough traffic to warrant an interstate connection.

If you have an issue with how federal road dollars are being spent, then take it up with your representatives and senators.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 02:22 AM   #6586
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Looking at the map, I-22 is definitely necessary.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 03:37 AM   #6587
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I guess the Interstate designation is less important than the fact it has to be a 2x2 grade-separated route. Of course, including it on the Interstate list means federal money available..

Now if one asks me about major Interstate links (not only metropolitan ones) I think US still misses most, I'd go for the following alignments:

- upgrading US-101 to full Interstate standards all the way from San Jose to Los Angeles

- Las Vegas - Phoenix (along US-93 corridor)

- Amarillo - Wichita Falls - Fort Worth (the route is now a patch of expressways and non-upgraded US highways), with a side extension of I-27 south of Lubbock to I-20.

- Kansas City - Springfield - Little Rock and a completion of the Shreverport - I30 link and a link of Pine Bluff with Greenville and Jackson (MS).

- Montgomery - Tallahassee (as one can see, I think Deep South lacks many important connections).

- link I-64 (VA) with Morgantown (WV), opening a new Appalachian highway crossing

- a Kingsport - Columbus (OH) connection. That area is poorly served by old US routes meandering on the hilly/mountainous terrain

- a 30-year needed Norfolk - WIlmington link all the way though Delaware

- an Upstate NEw York Loop connecting I-81 to I-87 along the Canadian border + decent highway cross over Lake Champlain (NY-VT connections are a shame a.t.m.)

- Albany - Concord - Portland (ME) link, to offer a bypass for traffic routing south from the congest areas around Boston and New York metro. It would be a northern version of I-81: a route used heavily by long-distance freight trucks.

- a highway alongside the Mississippi from Minneapolis to St. Louis

- finally, a connection from Duluth to St. Saint Marie (Canada border), to be linked with a NE extension of I-43 from Green Bay (MI)



=========

I also have my dream unfeasible lists of highway projects, like some SE-NW highway all the way from Oregon to New Mexico via NV and UT.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 07:36 AM   #6588
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The thing missing from your Duluth-SSM musing is traffic on the part of US 2 west of US 41. It is a lonely drive, indeed, on those looooong stretches of highly-engineered two-lanes. You can go for 10-20 minutes and not meet another vehicle that is going the other way.

East of US 41, yes, IMHO, it would be a good corridor for a potential I-route extension. The closer it gets to I-75, the busier it gets, especially during tourist season.

Mike
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Old March 14th, 2011, 07:54 AM   #6589
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Morgantown already has I-68 and I-79, or so says Google Maps - what's that got to do with 64? I-66 is vastly closer anyway, and besides, it's too close to I-68, if you wanna get from Washington to Morgantown just use I-66 west, then I-81 north, then I-68 west and you're there.

A much better project IMO is to upgrade the entire length of I-81 in Virginia. It's got far too much traffic for a 4-lane highway, even just adding one lane each direction would vastly help. There have been plans thrown this way and that over the past decade about upgrading it but nothing's come of it. Perhaps the new intermodal railyard they're gonna build (or already building?) near Roanoke will help take some of the freight off...
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Old March 14th, 2011, 09:59 AM   #6590
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Originally Posted by nerdly_dood View Post
Morgantown already has I-68 and I-79, or so says Google Maps - what's that got to do with 64? I-66 is vastly closer anyway, and besides, it's too close to I-68, if you wanna get from Washington to Morgantown just use I-66 west, then I-81 north, then I-68 west and you're there.

A much better project IMO is to upgrade the entire length of I-81 in Virginia. It's got far too much traffic for a 4-lane highway, even just adding one lane each direction would vastly help. There have been plans thrown this way and that over the past decade about upgrading it but nothing's come of it. Perhaps the new intermodal railyard they're gonna build (or already building?) near Roanoke will help take some of the freight off...
That stalled or is about to....due to Virgina's Highways over Rail policy.... SMART highways would fix Virgina's congestion issues....
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Old March 14th, 2011, 05:28 PM   #6591
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Originally Posted by nerdly_dood View Post
Morgantown already has I-68 and I-79, or so says Google Maps - what's that got to do with 64? I-66 is vastly closer anyway, and besides, it's too close to I-68, if you wanna get from Washington to Morgantown just use I-66 west, then I-81 north, then I-68 west and you're there.
...
Or 270 to 70 to 68.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 05:33 PM   #6592
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Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post

The thing missing from your Duluth-SSM musing is traffic on the part of US 2 west of US 41. It is a lonely drive, indeed, on those looooong stretches of highly-engineered two-lanes. You can go for 10-20 minutes and not meet another vehicle that is going the other way.

East of US 41, yes, IMHO, it would be a good corridor for a potential I-route extension. The closer it gets to I-75, the busier it gets, especially during tourist season.

Mike
I don't think some people in Europe get how sparsely populated huge chunks of the U.S. are.... (No disrespect meant, Suburbanist, but the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, so Wikipedia tells me, has the land area of the Netherlands and the population of Utrecht.)
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Old March 14th, 2011, 05:36 PM   #6593
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I guess the Interstate designation is less important than the fact it has to be a 2x2 grade-separated route. Of course, including it on the Interstate list means federal money available..

Now if one asks me about major Interstate links (not only metropolitan ones) I think US still misses most, I'd go for the following alignments:

- upgrading US-101 to full Interstate standards all the way from San Jose to Los Angeles
And leave it as US-101. Some people want this to be I-3, but Californians don't.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- Las Vegas - Phoenix (along US-93 corridor)
How about number it I-13 and name it the Bad Luck Highway? This could go over the bridge located just South of Hoover dam...

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- Amarillo - Wichita Falls - Fort Worth (the route is now a patch of expressways and non-upgraded US highways), with a side extension of I-27 south of Lubbock to I-20.
US-287 Amarillo-Bowie and US-81 Bowie-DFW. Perhaps, I would number it I-34. In addition I would extend I-27 to Limon, CO along US-287, creating a link between Denver and the DFW area.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- Kansas City - Springfield - Little Rock and a completion of the Shreverport - I30 link and a link of Pine Bluff with Greenville and Jackson (MS).
Shreveport to I-30 is planned as part of I-49 to Kansas City. I would merge the other two routes with I-530 and I would name it I-53.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- Montgomery - Tallahassee (as one can see, I think Deep South lacks many important connections).
A reroute of I-65?

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- link I-64 (VA) with Morgantown (WV), opening a new Appalachian highway crossing
I would agree with Nerdly_Dood. I even have a better route to go from Washington DC to Morgantown: I-270, then I-70, then I-68. But I see that as another N-S corridor, just reroute I-79 there and name current I-79 to Charleston I-68.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- a Kingsport - Columbus (OH) connection. That area is poorly served by old US routes meandering on the hilly/mountainous terrain
Then I-26 should get renumbered to an odd number! But it is very difficult, because all odd numbers there are already in use...

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- a 30-year needed Norfolk - WIlmington link all the way though Delaware
It would be I-99, but a guy named Bud Shuster put it on the middle of PA... so it should be I-101. And I would extend to Wilmington NC (Thus creating a Wilmington-Wilmington highway ) or even to Savannah.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- an Upstate NEw York Loop connecting I-81 to I-87 along the Canadian border + decent highway cross over Lake Champlain (NY-VT connections are a shame a.t.m.)
I-98. I would continue it to I-95 in ME.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- Albany - Concord - Portland (ME) link, to offer a bypass for traffic routing south from the congest areas around Boston and New York metro. It would be a northern version of I-81: a route used heavily by long-distance freight trucks.
I-92. But I would end it at Portsmouth NH.

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- a highway alongside the Mississippi from Minneapolis to St. Louis
Avenue of the Saints anywhere? Maybe, but it should be numbered as a number that doesn't already exists as an US road! Maybe I-47, but then I-39 and I-43 should be renumbered as they are East of this potential I-state...

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
- finally, a connection from Duluth to St. Saint Marie (Canada border), to be linked with a NE extension of I-43 from Green Bay (MI)
Western I-98. I would extend it further West along US-2, with some proposals going as far as Spokane!

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Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
I also have my dream unfeasible lists of highway projects, like some SE-NW highway all the way from Oregon to New Mexico via NV and UT.
Once I had an idea for an I-38 going all the way through the country, from the Bay area to the Outer Banks. But that should be numbered as I-x0, no I-38. But it justified the I-238 in the Bay area.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 06:47 PM   #6594
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I agree with I-26 being renumbered. I grew up in Pikeville, Ky and US 23 is how we would get to Columbus to the north and Tri-cities to the south.
We always wondered if 26 would make it to Pikeville and then connect to Mountain Parkway and connect to I-64 in Winchester. But why renumber anyway..... leave it I-26 all the way to Columbus. If I-238 can exist 26 can be a weirdo interstate too

I was also told growing up that I-64 was originally to be routed from Beckley to Pikeville and then turn north to connect to the Mountain Parkway and onto its original route from Winchester to Lexington. Apparently West Virginia had a role in getting 64 routed onto the WV turnpike and then to connect Charleston to Huntington and then route it across KY's northern tier to Winchester. Not sure if there is truth in that.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 07:42 PM   #6595
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I don't think some people in Europe get how sparsely populated huge chunks of the U.S. are.... (No disrespect meant, Suburbanist, but the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, so Wikipedia tells me, has the land area of the Netherlands and the population of Utrecht.)
I have lived in Wyoming, so I get the idea of sparsely populated areas. However, even there in Wyoming, I-80 was relatively busy, mainly with truck traffic. So I though that an Interstate in Upper Michigan could boost Ontario-Midwest traffic, for instance, and maybe help revert stagnation on the area.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 08:20 PM   #6596
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I have lived in Wyoming, so I get the idea of sparsely populated areas. However, even there in Wyoming, I-80 was relatively busy, mainly with truck traffic. So I though that an Interstate in Upper Michigan could boost Ontario-Midwest traffic, for instance, and maybe help revert stagnation on the area.
Ah. Wyoming is sparsely populated, it's true!
But still, you're talking about connecting northen Minnesota and upper Michigan to northern Ontario and northwestern Quebec. None of which areas are all that populated. Most of the Midwest has connections to the most populated part of Ontario, through southern Michigan. Now, if Canada did something from Sault Sainte Marie to Montreal in conjunction with your Upper Peninsula, your Upper Peninsula Interstate might make more sense.
Now, what would people be transporting by truck? The thing I associate with northern Minnesota is iron ore, which - since the 19th century - they've been putting onto ships at Duluth.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 08:21 PM   #6597
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I have lived in Wyoming, so I get the idea of sparsely populated areas. However, even there in Wyoming, I-80 was relatively busy, mainly with truck traffic. So I though that an Interstate in Upper Michigan could boost Ontario-Midwest traffic, for instance, and maybe help revert stagnation on the area.
I agree that Interstates can spur some development and employment. I think Hays, Kansas could be an example of that. It's in the middle of nowhere but has numerous hotels and food services. Without I-70 I doubt any of that would have ever developed. A part of me would hate to see the UP change to a landscape with billboards and a scar on the land but it could be a great way to funnel some of the I-75 traffic that usually goes through lower Michigan and onto 90/80 into Wisconsin instead and points west/south.

Me and the Bf vacation with friends in Northern Michigan and since there's no direct way there from Kansas City we are choosing to fly to Detroit and drive up 75. If there was a faster route through the UP we'd drive instead.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 08:40 PM   #6598
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Memphis and Birmingham were already connected by U.S. 78. Was an interstate connection really necessary?

What about building the northern leg of the Birmingham beltway? There is no traffic in that part of the county to warrant this road. What about extending I-85 through Selma to Meridian when U.S. 80 more than suffices? BOONDOGGLE.
I don't think somebody from the Midwest should be lecturing us about unnecessary interstates. I look at Illinois alone, and the number of interstates there that don't seem to connect anything is mind-boggling.

I-72? I-88? I-39? I-57?
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Old March 14th, 2011, 08:54 PM   #6599
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I-39 is hardly "unnecessary". It allows traffic in many directions to avoid the Chicago area.

I-57 is a major long-distance freight route.
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Old March 14th, 2011, 08:57 PM   #6600
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The Montgomery-Tallahassee connection is served already by US 431/US 231 until I-10. It's pretty fast free-flowing highway, except for the cities the highways go through. I would recommend a piecemeal upgrade, starting first with freeway bypasses around Troy and Ozark. I would then start upgrading 231 between I-10 and Dothan to a freeway and 431 from Dothan towards Montgomery. Then finish off with a connection between the freeways north and south of Dothan.
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