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Old February 8th, 2012, 02:31 AM   #7801
Botev1912
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myosh_tino View Post
If you're including raised reflectors, then I strongly disagree with you because painted lines have a tendency to "disappear" when it's raining. At least RPMs provide an audible cue to drivers when they drift out of their lane.
They would be fine if they looked like the markings in New Zealand. But when most of them break fast, they make the road look terrible. What's the point of wasting money for something that doesn't last as expected but it is still used?
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Old February 8th, 2012, 07:06 AM   #7802
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myosh_tino View Post
If you're including raised reflectors, then I strongly disagree with you because painted lines have a tendency to "disappear" when it's raining. At least RPMs provide an audible cue to drivers when they drift out of their lane.
Yeah raised reflectors should be used. However, it also depends on the type of pavement. If the pavement is open-graded porous asphalt, the water seeps through and there won't be standing water on the roadway. In those situations, a reflective stripe would be sufficient.

But in areas where non-porous asphalt and concrete is used, the lines would disappear, so raised reflectors should be used.

Also, in many countries, painted lines are actually embedded in the pavement. A groove is made and then the lines are installed into the groove, which makes them last longer.

RPMs in Seattle cost anywhere between 50 cents each to a few dollars, depending on the contract and the amount ordered. I've seen prices as high as $4.00 per marking...
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Old February 8th, 2012, 08:49 PM   #7803
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
They would be fine if they looked like the markings in New Zealand. But when most of them break fast, they make the road look terrible. What's the point of wasting money for something that doesn't last as expected but it is still used?
Depends on your definition of "break fast" is. In California, RPMs have a lifespan of 5-10 years and since they are installed in groups of 4, it's not a big deal if one of them breaks.

In more recent paving jobs, a combination of RPMs and thermoplastic striping have been used for lane-line striping.
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Old February 8th, 2012, 10:52 PM   #7804
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Portions of some controlled-access highways in Texas (mainly the interstates) are gonna look like they're on steroids, like Katy Freeway.
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I honestly think all development projects must be sustainable and futureproof.

You support the good projects... and oppose the bad.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 04:52 AM   #7805
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Originally Posted by tradephoric View Post
Here's the road network that INRIX analyzed in Tampa. I don't know how good of a job INRIX does evaluating congestion within a city when only freeways are analyzed. US-19 carries up to 80,000 vehicles per day yet since it's mainly a surface street with signalized intersections the route wasn't analyzed (at least the section through Clearwater):
That explains why Metro Atlanta got such a good ranking.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 06:52 AM   #7806
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In more recent paving jobs, a combination of RPMs and thermoplastic striping have been used for lane-line striping.
They put new markings on a lot of street in Seattle area that past summer. Now several months later, there are spots on the roads, where these markings are completely gone or there is only 1 left out of 4.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 08:09 AM   #7807
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I'm trying to expand a little bit on the INRIX congestion ratings. Here is the road networks to cities with relatively bad congestion to population rating ratios:

Bridgeport -Congestion Ranking: #24


San Jose - Congestion Ranking #18


Austin - Congestion Ranking #26


San Francisco - Congestion Ranking #6


Baltimore - Congestion Ranking #14


Seattle - Congestion Ranking #10


Minneapolis - Congestion Ranking #11


Denver - Congestion Ranking #16
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Old February 9th, 2012, 08:20 AM   #7808
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And here's cities with relatively good congestion to population ratios...

Tuscon - Congestion Ranking: #88


Tampa - Congestion Ranking: #38


Orlando - Congestion Ranking: #43


Detroit - Congestion Ranking: #22


Miami - Congestion Ranking: #15


Phoenix - Congestion Ranking: #19


St. Louis - Congestion Ranking: #25


Is there any comparisons that can be made? Just looking through the maps it seems that cities with a rats nest of concentrated freeways are more congested then cities with well defined freeway networks.

Last edited by tradephoric; February 9th, 2012 at 08:32 AM.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 08:57 PM   #7809
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
They put new markings on a lot of street in Seattle area that past summer. Now several months later, there are spots on the roads, where these markings are completely gone or there is only 1 left out of 4.
Actually, I'm a little surprised that WSDOT uses raised pavement markers due to the fact that is snows in Seattle a few times each year and snowplows are an RPM's worst nightmare. California does not use RPMs on I-80 over Donner Pass or on I-5 north of Redding because of the use of snowplows during the winter months. In fact, Caltrans will "embed" the reflectors in the road surface (concrete or asphalt) so they won't be scraped off by snowplows.
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Old February 10th, 2012, 08:16 AM   #7810
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
They put new markings on a lot of street in Seattle area that past summer. Now several months later, there are spots on the roads, where these markings are completely gone or there is only 1 left out of 4.
Seattle DOT uses RPMs almost exclusively with paint. I find that it's not even the snow plows that do the most damage. By the time snow plows get to it, the buses have already pushed them all off the street. I honestly don't understand the fascination with RPMs in this state.

WSDOT is phasing them out, opting for profiled plastic markings instead like in the Netherlands.
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Old February 10th, 2012, 09:24 AM   #7811
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Lynnwood and Bellevue use these markings without paint and they don't hold up. I can't understand why they keep using them.
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Old February 10th, 2012, 05:36 PM   #7812
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HAWC1506 View Post
Seattle DOT uses RPMs almost exclusively with paint. I find that it's not even the snow plows that do the most damage. By the time snow plows get to it, the buses have already pushed them all off the street. I honestly don't understand the fascination with RPMs in this state.

WSDOT is phasing them out, opting for profiled plastic markings instead like in the Netherlands.
Keep in mind that studded tires are legal in Washington and they will also remove road markings very quickly, in addition to quickly cutting deep ruts into the road's surfaces themselves.

They are very expensive to highway departments and is why Wisconsin outlawed them back in about 1975.

Mike
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Old February 11th, 2012, 10:53 PM   #7813
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Lynnwood and Bellevue use these markings without paint and they don't hold up. I can't understand why they keep using them.
Most of the time (and I find this common in many transport agencies, whether it be highway or public transport) is the mindset of "We've always done it this way."

It's very common among organizations I've seen and I have no idea why. To them, it's almost like nobody knows about the world beyond the U.S.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post
Keep in mind that studded tires are legal in Washington and they will also remove road markings very quickly, in addition to quickly cutting deep ruts into the road's surfaces themselves.

They are very expensive to highway departments and is why Wisconsin outlawed them back in about 1975.

Mike
There was an estimate that studded tires in Washington causes $18 million of road damage a year. I find that number to be too low, seeing how many highways that were paved just a few years ago are starting to show signs of deterioration.

Several attempts have been made to outlaw studded tires, but of course the industry's against it...
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Old February 14th, 2012, 11:34 PM   #7814
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I think that USA thread of "non interste highway" should have a thread of every state as europe countries has. California has one Texas, Maine and so on as in europe we have france has one thread, sweden spain and so on.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 11:35 PM   #7815
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I think that USA thread of " USA interste highway" should have a thread of every state as europe countries has. California has one Texas, Maine and so on as in europe we have france has one thread, sweden spain and so on.[/QUOTE]


Forget of the "non" I meant USA I H. Sorry
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Old February 16th, 2012, 05:35 AM   #7817
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I think that USA thread of " USA interste highway" should have a thread of every state as europe countries has. California has one Texas, Maine and so on as in europe we have france has one thread, sweden spain and so on.


Forget of the "non" I meant USA I H. Sorry
State highways are all lumped together within the Non-Interstate thread.

However, this thread is for the national Interstate Highway System, which is the same system in all 50 states and Puerto Rico.
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Old February 16th, 2012, 09:30 AM   #7818
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The westbound deck of the San Francisco Bay Bridge (I-80) is scheduled to close this Presidents’ Day weekend.





For more information: http://baybridgeinfo.org/

Just for fun, some renderings of the completed bridge, set to open next year:


http://www.mtc.ca.gov/planning/bay_bridge/


http://techstar.agatho.com/products_cable.html


http://baybridgeinfo.org/media/image...e#.TzyyTLSwVM0

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Old February 16th, 2012, 06:23 PM   #7819
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It looks really nice.
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Old February 21st, 2012, 04:07 AM   #7820
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What will happend to the old bridge
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