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Old June 29th, 2007, 03:24 PM   #861
ChrisZwolle
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Beautiful scenery, but the road on that pic above my post looks kind of dated. 55 or 60mph, it's all very slow. But i don't think it makes much of a difference, considering the size of Oahu island.
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Old June 30th, 2007, 02:32 AM   #862
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Not meaning to be an ass here, but besides being a huge freeway with many lanes per direction and all, what diference will it really make compared to any other interstate??

Ok, the idea of the train lines going by is cool, but is it really goog to try to putt all the things in one? I mean, if you want to put a line for rail freight alongside you will have to have really mild inclinations for example, which will make it much more difficult.
Wouldn't it be better to separate?
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Old June 30th, 2007, 08:04 AM   #863
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Will it actually go in Mexico?
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Old July 6th, 2007, 02:23 AM   #864
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Do y'all think Houston actually has that bad of traffic.

People around here always say Houston has terrible traffic but from my experiences, I don't think I've been in that bad of traffic (that I can remember). And whenever I look on google maps-traffic, it never seems like there is a lot of traffic, but yea, there IS traffic though. It just usually isn't as much as cities that, according to Wikipedia, supposedly don't normally have as much traffic as Houston.

Sorry if this isn't the right forum. OH, and pics of Houston traffic are more than welcome!
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Old July 6th, 2007, 06:23 AM   #865
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Every big city has traffic problems but honestly Houston's has a good highway system.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 06:26 AM   #866
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Yeah, Houston has probably one of the better highway systems in the US.

It's just there's not much of an alternative there...
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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:21 AM   #867
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I'm not saying Houston doesn't, but how does it have a better highway system than other cities?

And just for the heck of it, I thought I would post a picture I took flying into Bush Intercon. Airport.

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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:42 AM   #868
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I've heard that Houston has no rail network? is that true, coz if it is you're pretty ****ed if you dont have a car
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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:47 AM   #869
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^ Houston has a small light rail system, which is being extended.
It also has railroads, and a Amtrak train station, but I figure that most rail used is for frieght.

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I'm not saying Houston doesn't, but how does it have a better highway system than other cities?
I've never been to Houston, but from what I've heard, the system was better designed because the development grew as the highways were built, unlike in other cities where plenty of neighborhoods were demolished to make way for the highways.

Plus, I like the radial system, with the two beltways. Route 6 on the map is not a highway.

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Old July 6th, 2007, 08:01 AM   #870
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by light rail, do you mean trams/streetcars?

Houston's freeway network is massive personally I think its the best in the whole country! If in doubt, check Texasfreeway.com. Ultimate
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Old July 6th, 2007, 12:03 PM   #871
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Houston has a very efficient freeway/tollway system. And the city doesn't encounter geographic problems like oceans and mountains (like Los Angeles).

I heard Houston is the largest city in size within the city proper.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:34 PM   #872
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angry Bob View Post
you're pretty ****ed if you dont have a car
Very True
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Originally Posted by TenRot View Post
Route 6 on the map is not a highway.
What?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris1491 View Post
I heard Houston is the largest city in size within the city proper.
I don't no if that's true or not but if it is, it's not hard to believe. Houston is pretty big!
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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:41 PM   #873
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Quote:
Chandler: guys are signing their 401Ks to me!

Phoebe: You work with robots?!!
Could you BE any more addicted to friends?
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Old July 6th, 2007, 08:21 PM   #874
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Quote:
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Could you BE any more addicted to friends?
I probably could
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Old July 6th, 2007, 09:11 PM   #875
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin_wk View Post
What?
I meant that Route 6 isn't a limited access freeway like the other loops are.
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Old July 16th, 2007, 04:46 AM   #876
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Boston's Big Dig - Lessons Learned

US looks for lessons in Boston's $15 bln "Big Dig"

BOSTON, July 12 (Reuters) - From his store in Boston's Italian North End, John DiPaolo watches as workers plant trees in a park that, when complete, will mark the end of the $15 billion "Big Dig" road and tunnel construction project.

"It was a waste of time and money," said DiPaolo, 56, standing behind the counter of D&G Meat Market on a street next to Boston's 15-year project. "The costs keep rising and instead of a park I'd rather see homes there."

DiPaolo's view reflects the conflicted emotions in Boston toward the costliest public works project in U.S. history a year after cement fell from a tunnel ceiling, crushing a car, killing a woman passenger and shattering public confidence.

Some, like DiPaolo, question the merits of an urban engineering project compared in scale to the building of the Panama Canal, while others extol the benefits of a swifter commute through a notoriously congested city and the sprouting of trees and plants where a rusting highway once stood.

With 7.5 miles (12 km) of underground highway and a 183-foot (56-metre) wide cable-stayed bridge, the "Big Dig" replaced an ailing elevated expressway to fix chronic congestion and reunite downtown Boston with its historic waterfront neighborhoods.

Despite a "stem to stern" inspection last year that found it fundamentally safe, many Bostonians still regard it with trepidation, citing years of mismanagement of the kind highlighted on Tuesday by the National Transportation Safety Board in its review of last year's fatality.

The U.S. transportation investigator blamed the collapse on the wrong kind of glue used to hold up the concrete ceiling, and criticized the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority for poor oversight and noted mistakes by contractors including private U.S. ceiling designer Gannett Fleming Inc.

The problems reverberate beyond Boston to other U.S. cities considering so-called "mega-projects" that involve the tearing down of aging elevated highways built in a construction boom of the 1950s and 1960s to channel growing traffic underground and free up land for parks or other facilities.

PROJECTS IN OTHER CITIES

"People look at the Big Dig and it makes them more skeptical, and therefore they ask harder questions -- whether it's on the cost side or the management side," said David Luberoff, a Harvard researcher and co-author of "Mega-Projects: The Changing Politics of Urban Public Investment."

"The Big Dig underscores what happens if you don't get it right. Hopefully, people will learn from this," said Luberoff.

Seattle is struggling to convince voters that replacing the earthquake-vulnerable Alaska Way Viaduct on its waterfront with a $3 billion to $3.6 billion tunnel is worth the cost.

Brooklyn, whose waterfront could be transformed if an elevated expressway were buried, faces a similar problem.

Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley is conducting a criminal investigation of last year's accident that killed a 38-year-old woman and could decide soon whether to seek indictments. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has urged her "to hold accountable all those who should be held accountable."

Still, many Bostonians praise the Big Dig while grumbling about its execution.

About 260 acres (105 hectares) of new parks, trees and sidewalks were freed by it. It also cut the average peak travel time on northbound Interstate 93 by 17 minutes to about 3 minutes after major road construction ended last year, according to a Massachusetts Turnpike Authority study.

And it has been a tourism boon to the North End, a dense district of restaurants, cafes and historic buildings bordering the area where the highway once stood and where landscapers are finishing two grassy parks set to open by October that represent the project's final phase.

"It's been great both in bringing more people to the North End and, at the same time, changing people's perceptions of this historic part of the city. It has reconnected the North End back to Boston," said Guild Nichols, a longtime North End resident who runs www.northendboston.com .

Dan McNichol, author of "The Roads that Built America," said cities that could benefit from a Big Dig-style underground highway include Philadelphia, where an elevated section of Interstate 95 divides the city from the Delaware River, and St. Louis, where Interstate 70 runs along the Mississippi River.

But legal skirmishes over the project look set to linger. The family of the woman killed last year has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the Turnpike Authority and several companies associated with the project, including project manager Bechtel/ Parsons Brinckerhoff, which have said they stand behind their work.
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Old July 19th, 2007, 10:57 AM   #877
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Of all the drivers over United States, DC metro area has one of the worst. I guess DC drivers are still adjusting to the fast growing traffic jams that make this area as one of the worst traffic jams in US (and many accidents occured everyday). On the other hand, LA Drivers are one of the most aggressive and assertive drivers yet they know what they are doing. They drive like 80 - 85 mph but I don't see frequent accidents unlike the one I see in DC everyday and you rarely hear or see accidents on the news. I guess driving is a big culture for LA or people are just that good?
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Old July 19th, 2007, 09:55 PM   #878
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Why speed limits in USA are so low?
Some states have them as low as 65mph which is just 105kmph.
Even fast states (New Mexico for example) have lmit set at 75mph (121kmph)
In most European countries limit is 130 kmph (80mph) even if European freeways have more curves and are often narrower than American.
Beside limit is often ignored and quite a lot of people drive around 150kmph (92mph) and police seems not to care to much.
I don't even mention German highways
Maybe answer is in using km, not miles. Only country in Europe which I know having ridiculous limit (70 mph –112kmph) is UK J
Just joking!!
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Old July 19th, 2007, 10:03 PM   #879
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And European rural motorways are generally much busier than the deserted and lone Interstates west of the Mississippi/Missouri.
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Old July 20th, 2007, 05:46 AM   #880
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
Why speed limits in USA are so low?
Because of the false assumption that speed is the main reason for traffic collisions. In the USA, the biggest crime is speeding and not stopping for the STOP signs. Most traffic tickets are exactly for these two types of offences.

Quote:
Some states have them as low as 65mph which is just 105kmph.
Some eastern states have a maximum limit of 90 km/h.

Quote:
Even fast states (New Mexico for example) have lmit set at 75mph (121kmph)
Actually, in Texas they recently raised the limit to 130 km/h. Other states have lower limits.
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