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Old February 21st, 2016, 04:56 PM   #11381
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I-44 rest area near St. Clair (MO), located inside the median. After a fatal accident (car slammed on the back of a slow moving truck entering the left lane), people are calling the local DOT to do something about it


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Quote:
Weekley was driving a Ford Focus on Jan. 31 as they headed east through Franklin County on Interstate 44. Neither wore a seat belt, according to a Missouri Highway Patrol report.

At 7:10 p.m., a tractor-trailer driven by a man from Covina, Calif., had just entered the interstate from the rest stop and was accelerating with its hazard lights on.

Weekley crashed into the back of the semi, driving under the trailer portion of the truck.

He and Sutherland were killed.

(...)

She said she had traveled frequently and had never seen a rest area in the median of an interstate. She wants officials to move it to prevent more crashes.

“Something definitely needs to be done,” Holt said of the rest area’s location. “Nobody should have to bury their 22-year-old son.”

But state data show the accident rate around the rest area is in line with the state average near rest stops. And on a recent visit to the rest stop, drivers took heed of the signs about a mile from the rest area in each direction warning of its unusual location.

Signs also alert eastbound drivers that it’s the last rest area in Missouri. Westbound travelers are told there’s not another rest area for 127 miles.

(...)

The rest area has bathrooms, plenty of covered picnic tables and expansive parking lots for cars and big rigs.

Construction began in 1967 on the rest area — built on the site of a 75-foot-deep, open-pit coal mine that was filled in with dirt — and it opened the next year, according to Post-Dispatch archives.

These days, about 32,000 vehicles a day drive by it

MoDOT will take a close look at the recent accident report to see if there’s anything to be done to prevent other crashes, she said, such as building an acceleration lane on Interstate 44.

“That’s one of the solutions we could look at if we had the funding,”
source
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Old February 21st, 2016, 05:04 PM   #11382
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The eastbound rest area is on an uphill stretch of highway. The merging lane is rather short, they could extend the merging lane, there's plenty of space for it.
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Old February 21st, 2016, 10:15 PM   #11383
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Here's a recent picture of I-95 nearby Fort Lauderdale Airport:


flickr.com

And here's my picture from the same stretch of I-95, shot back in 2009:



If you look closely, you will see that they have changed the signs with some new ones in the meantime.


/I'll confess: I just wanted to share with you the first picture. It's superb.
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Old February 21st, 2016, 10:20 PM   #11384
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They've also changed the plane
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Old February 21st, 2016, 10:23 PM   #11385
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The eastbound rest area is on an uphill stretch of highway. The merging lane is rather short, they could extend the merging lane, there's plenty of space for it.
Honestly, it seems it was primarily the driver's fault....
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Old February 21st, 2016, 11:44 PM   #11386
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The eastbound rest area is on an uphill stretch of highway. The merging lane is rather short, they could extend the merging lane, there's plenty of space for it.
The problem ultimately derives from the basic issue of having left-hand exits and entries. The best solution would be fly-overs. Yes, its expensive, but this can be compensated by only having one rest area in the middle serving both directions.
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 12:01 AM   #11387
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Left-lane exits are not ideal, but left-lane entrances are worse.
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 12:02 AM   #11388
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
The problem ultimately derives from the basic issue of having left-hand exits and entries. The best solution would be fly-overs. Yes, its expensive, but this can be compensated by only having one rest area in the middle serving both directions.
Probably cheaper to demolish the rest area entirely and build two new ones.

edit

actually, incredibly it is two rest areas already !
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 12:52 AM   #11389
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Left-hand exits should be reserve solely for HOV ramps and nothing else, to discourage left-lane camping.
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 01:13 AM   #11390
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Originally Posted by Joshua Dodd View Post
A much needed upgrade! Construction has started for a brand new interchange for the 360 and I-30 interchange in Arlington, Tx. According to the Star Telegram, this project is going to be massive. On par to the High Five big.

Here is a render of the new interchange:
What a monster!!!
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 08:55 PM   #11391
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Roads in the U.S. are made of concrete if it's a bridge only, except in some freeways like the ones in Houston which are fully concrete made.
A lot of urban freeways are concrete, rural are almost always asphalt.
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 08:58 PM   #11392
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In Europe, most toll road operators also prefer asphalt over concrete, even with high truck volumes. Nearly all toll roads in France or Italy are paved with asphalt and are almost always in top-notch condition, no matter how old the road is.
I haven't seen concrete bridges in Europe. Are there any? Almost all bridges in the US and Canada are concrete.
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 09:06 PM   #11393
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I-49 Kansas City DDI

European bridges usually are made of concrete, including the superstructure, but are paved with asphalt on top of it. As far as I know many U.S. bridges have a situation where the concrete superstructure is also the pavement.

Here's an unusual diverging diamond interchange design, planned for I-49 in Kansas City.

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Old February 22nd, 2016, 09:21 PM   #11394
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
European bridges usually are made of concrete, including the superstructure, but are paved with asphalt on top of it. As far as I know many U.S. bridges have a situation where the concrete superstructure is also the pavement.
Usually, there's a thin "wearing" layer on top of the actual structural material.

Quote:
Here's an unusual diverging diamond interchange design, planned for I-49 in Kansas City.

...or, how to get turned around completely and find yourself going the way that you came!

(cue yakety sax or watch the Grand Finale from the original Pink Panther movie)
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 09:29 PM   #11395
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hacci View Post
Roads in the U.S. are made of concrete if it's a bridge only, except in some freeways like the ones in Houston which are fully concrete made.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
A lot of urban freeways are concrete, rural are almost always asphalt.
It pretty much depends where you are and what the different areas felt like paying for. In metro Baltimore you'll find both depending on which municipality you're in.

I don't think I've found a modern concrete freeway in North Carolina just yet, rural or otherwise. Some of the older non-Interstate freeways here may still have some concrete sections.
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Old February 23rd, 2016, 06:33 AM   #11396
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
European bridges usually are made of concrete, including the superstructure, but are paved with asphalt on top of it. As far as I know many U.S. bridges have a situation where the concrete superstructure is also the pavement.

Here's an unusual diverging diamond interchange design, planned for I-49 in Kansas City.

I like this design

I bet you could accommodate 2 way frontage roads that are separate from the ramps(thus avoiding scary crossovers) by having a big 6 way roundabout at each of the bridge. Mega-dumbell. Would work for rural areas where there is a huge distance between overpasses but low traffic.
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Last edited by zaphod; February 23rd, 2016 at 06:40 AM.
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Old February 28th, 2016, 07:46 PM   #11397
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If that interchange design was here in Cincinnati, people would DIE! People can barely manage a turn-signal, red light or lane merge here.
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Old February 28th, 2016, 08:12 PM   #11398
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I wonder how the flow would work out
It looks like anything more than a small traffic flow across the local road would congest immediately
But turning movements are good
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Old February 28th, 2016, 10:22 PM   #11399
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I-75, Tennessee

A rockslide has blocked a part of I-75 in northern Tennessee. It blocked the northbound lanes, but the freeway is closed in both directions due to slope stability concerns. I-75 could be closed for multiple weeks, according to the media. The posted detour is via US 25W.



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Old February 29th, 2016, 05:00 AM   #11400
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The person in the article who says they've never seen a rest stop in the median has obviously never driven on I-95. Our rest stop in Delaware is in the median, and the Chesapeake House and Maryland House in Maryland are in the median as well. I think I remember a rest stop in the median in New England somewhere, as well.

Seems like the problem is the driver. A 22-year old that we already know wasn't wearing a seat belt, which is against the law and indicates personal disregard. I'm guessing that he was going 80 mph, 90 mph, or higher, and didn't even have the space to slam on the brakes. It also seems he didn't pay attention to traffic up ahead to slow down to a reasonable speed under the limit, like 50 or so, as he passed the rest stop.
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