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Old June 28th, 2017, 11:03 AM   #12221
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Quote:
Originally Posted by browntown View Post
Eh, it's not really comparable. I actually just came into this thread to make a comment about how insane it is that the Goethals Bridge has a $15 toll and saw this comment. The difference is that basically everything in the New York area costs 10x as much as it would in a place like Georgia so the comparison is all wrong. I mean, the new Goethals bridge isn't a very big bridge at all and wouldn't even have a toll in most of the country since it's so small, but in New York it's a huge deal was an insane toll that's more than the entire NJ Turnpike just because of all the wastefulness associated with building in New York.
In that case I think I mean upstate NY, but I know where you're coming from.

I could never imagine paying $15 for a TOLL. The Grand Island Bridge toll is $1, last I checked. The supervisor of the island actually made a video about the tolls...

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Old June 28th, 2017, 08:23 PM   #12222
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Interstate 555, Arkansas

A bridge over I-555 in Arkansas sustained significant damage after a truck crashed into the support columns and caught fire.
All four columns supporting the bridge at this location were impacted. The first (easternmost) column is completely destroyed and about 25 feet of the cap (the horizontal part of the bent) has been pulled out from under three of the steel beams it supported.

The second and third columns also sustained heavy damage. The fourth column was the least impacted but showed signs of significant spall due to the intense fire. Three of the 10 beams supporting the bridge deck have no support underneath and have begun to sag under the weight of the bridge deck. This has caused the deck to crack in the immediate area. Regardless, AHTD structural engineers have determined the bridge is stable and not in danger of collapse.


http://www.kait8.com/story/35758197/...on-at-overpass
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Old July 1st, 2017, 05:08 AM   #12223
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Video of Interstate 64 through Downtown Louisville, Kentuky:

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Old July 1st, 2017, 06:14 AM   #12224
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
A bridge over I-555 in Arkansas sustained significant damage after a truck crashed into the support columns and caught fire.
All four columns supporting the bridge at this location were impacted. The first (easternmost) column is completely destroyed and about 25 feet of the cap (the horizontal part of the bent) has been pulled out from under three of the steel beams it supported.

The second and third columns also sustained heavy damage. The fourth column was the least impacted but showed signs of significant spall due to the intense fire. Three of the 10 beams supporting the bridge deck have no support underneath and have begun to sag under the weight of the bridge deck. This has caused the deck to crack in the immediate area. Regardless, AHTD structural engineers have determined the bridge is stable and not in danger of collapse.


http://www.kait8.com/story/35758197/...on-at-overpass
That's a crazy accident. It looks like there wasn't any crash protection in front of the bridge piers... They definitely appear to be somewhat set back from the traveled portion of the roadway, but it still appears to be a noteworthy omission.
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Old July 1st, 2017, 10:38 AM   #12225
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I've seen that some states are putting up barriers along bridge piers with only two columns. If one column fails in an accident, the whole bridge could collapse.

Normally there would be some kind of obstacle-free zone along the freeway, where no objects can be placed without a barrier to fend off stray vehicles.
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Old July 13th, 2017, 09:09 PM   #12226
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I-10 San Bernardino Freeway, California

10 Freeway toll lanes approved for across San Bernardino County


San Bernardino County will make its first foray into toll lanes.

A 33-mile corridor will be built on the 10 Freeway and span much of the county, transportation officials decided Wednesday, July 12.

The $1.8-billion project would add two toll lanes from the Los Angeles County line near Montclair east to Redlands. An auxiliary lane for traffic to weave in and out at ramps also will be added at various points along the general-purpose lanes.

Construction, which would be split into two stages, is expected to start in late 2018. The first segment, from the county line to the 15 Freeway, is expected to be finished by 2022. The rest would begin in 2021 and take three years to complete.
Full report: http://www.pe.com/2017/07/12/toll-la...ardino-county/

This is one of the largest expansion projects in Southern California. It will add two express lanes across a 33 mile corridor from the Los Angeles County line to Redlands, creating a continuous 12 lane freeway, with 4 general purpose lanes and 2 tolled express lanes each way. Auxiliary lanes will also be constructed at various locations.

The project alternatives (the express lane alternative was selected)


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Old July 13th, 2017, 10:42 PM   #12227
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^ While I am decidedly in favour of this project, it does seem like somewhat of a moot operation if LA County doesn't also enact something similar along it's portion of I-10 into Downtown. (Or at least builds a direct connection to the El Monte Busway). I know that LA County is currently widening the 10 Freeway west of the Kellogg Interchange, but at this point Tolled Express Lanes aren't envisioned on that corridor.
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Old July 13th, 2017, 11:51 PM   #12228
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I wonder why that was decided at the county level.
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Old July 14th, 2017, 03:26 PM   #12229
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In some states the road / transit development is the task of regional authorities, often a county or collection of counties through a council of governments (COG).

For example the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) is generally known as a transit agency, but is also responsible for the planning and funding of major freeway projects. In the Dallas area, the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) is responsible for planning and prioritizing freeway projects.
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Old July 16th, 2017, 11:38 AM   #12230
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I-94 Wisconsin

The Zoo Interchange in Milwaukee

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Old July 16th, 2017, 11:54 AM   #12231
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I-95 Delaware Turnpike

I find this interesting in the U.S. A concrete bridge deck on an asphalt highway. Apparently the bridge deck also doubles as the driving surface, so if they want to smoothen out the pavement, the whole deck needs to be replaced.

This is uncommon in Europe (I'd say it's quite rare), usually the entire highway is either concrete or more commonly, asphalt. So they pour asphalt on top of the bridge deck, so they can resurface the pavement without having to replace the bridge structure.

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Old July 16th, 2017, 08:38 PM   #12232
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I-11, Nevada

The first 2 mile section of Interstate 11 southbound will open to traffic by the end of July. It runs through the Railroad Pass near Henderson, from the current I-515 terminus through the pass, to a new flyover to US 93/95.

https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/n...e-end-of-july/

The whole project will be completed by late 2018.

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Old July 17th, 2017, 12:58 AM   #12233
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
10 Freeway toll lanes approved for across San Bernardino County


San Bernardino County will make its first foray into toll lanes.

A 33-mile corridor will be built on the 10 Freeway and span much of the county, transportation officials decided Wednesday, July 12.

The $1.8-billion project would add two toll lanes from the Los Angeles County line near Montclair east to Redlands. An auxiliary lane for traffic to weave in and out at ramps also will be added at various points along the general-purpose lanes.

Construction, which would be split into two stages, is expected to start in late 2018. The first segment, from the county line to the 15 Freeway, is expected to be finished by 2022. The rest would begin in 2021 and take three years to complete.
Full report: http://www.pe.com/2017/07/12/toll-la...ardino-county/

This is one of the largest expansion projects in Southern California. It will add two express lanes across a 33 mile corridor from the Los Angeles County line to Redlands, creating a continuous 12 lane freeway, with 4 general purpose lanes and 2 tolled express lanes each way. Auxiliary lanes will also be constructed at various locations.

The project alternatives (the express lane alternative was selected)


I hope we never build toll lanes in Arizona
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Old July 17th, 2017, 03:02 AM   #12234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I find this interesting in the U.S. A concrete bridge deck on an asphalt highway. Apparently the bridge deck also doubles as the driving surface, so if they want to smoothen out the pavement, the whole deck needs to be replaced.

This is uncommon in Europe (I'd say it's quite rare), usually the entire highway is either concrete or more commonly, asphalt. So they pour asphalt on top of the bridge deck, so they can resurface the pavement without having to replace the bridge structure.

This is actually pretty common on American roads. I wouldn't call it universal, but it is a normality.
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Old July 17th, 2017, 11:44 PM   #12235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
This is actually pretty common on American roads. I wouldn't call it universal, but it is a normality.
I read somewhere that it has got to do with snow/ice. Not sure how true that is.
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Old July 17th, 2017, 11:44 PM   #12236
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I hope we never build toll lanes in Arizona
Or their worse sibling - toll lanes.
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Old July 20th, 2017, 10:57 AM   #12237
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I read somewhere that it has got to do with snow/ice. Not sure how true that is.
I don't know how keeping bare concrete on bridges would help with ice and snow. In fact it might make things worse.
Salt used for combating snow and ice is quite corrosive to concrete. If you have layer of asphalt (like in Europe) you can just replace the wearing course every few years quite easily (again common practice in Europe).

If the concrete structure of the bridge have to be replaced or fixed it is much more complicated and expensive.

What's more striking that even on concrete highways in Europe bridges are often paved with asphalt. Completely opposite than in the US where many bridges on concrete and asphalt bridges are just left as concrete.

Does anyone have explanation for such divergent approach on both sides of the Atlantic? Is it just due to historical and cultural reason (like "we have always done it that way")?
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Old July 21st, 2017, 09:29 AM   #12238
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One reason is because the the ground and subsequently the asphalt as well, settles on either side of the bridge (we're talking short bridges) creating a dip in the road right before and after the bridge. Keeping the deck concrete allows for a more seemless connection between between the road and the bridge. Much smoother transition
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Old July 21st, 2017, 11:07 AM   #12239
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One reason is because the the ground and subsequently the asphalt as well, settles on either side of the bridge (we're talking short bridges) creating a dip in the road right before and after the bridge. Keeping the deck concrete allows for a more seemless connection between between the road and the bridge. Much smoother transition
That can't be a reason, bridges in Europe don't have any bigger "dips" than in the US despite being covered by asphalt. In fact I find the difference between the average bridge deck level and the highway level bigger when driving in the US.

Honestly, I could never find definite answer why American engineers stick to policy of concrete decks and European ones to asphalt decks, regardless what is the surface of the highway itself.

It could be, as I mentioned, simply cultural, something like "we have always done it that way". I really don't know.
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Old July 21st, 2017, 09:36 PM   #12240
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Quote:
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Honestly, I could never find definite answer why American engineers stick to policy of concrete decks and European ones to asphalt decks, regardless what is the surface of the highway itself.
That goes down to standardisation. Guidelines set the limits in with engineers can find a solution. In some cases the limits are so tight that only one option is available to chose from. That leads to a uniform outcome which is quite often an explicit aim. It is simpler to operate and maintain structures like bridges if they are all very similar.
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