daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 26th, 2007, 05:30 PM   #1421
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,665
Likes (Received): 1261

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
I like the milemarker-exits better.

The US problem with that is that while there aren't often multiple exits within 1 km, there are often multiple within a mile. Sometimes you have exit 53A - D or something. (American urban exits are usually somewhat closer to eachother than European urban exits).
In some cities like Chicago they build too many expressway exits. The ramps are really small, and as soon as an exit/entrance ramp ends another exit/entrance ramp starts. This is why the traffic is so bad in the mornings, IMO.



On the newer urban/suburban expressways they do a better job of keeping the expressway exits at least a mile apart. When I drive to work in Columbus, there's some slowdown near the expressway exits (as people try to merge, and those on the right most lane try to get out), but the difference is that in Chicago, the expressway exits are often continuous without gaps in between so the entire expressway becomes slow.
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 26th, 2007, 05:30 PM   #1422
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,665
Likes (Received): 1261

Duplicate
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2007, 06:02 PM   #1423
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

I must agree with Paddington. So many exits have a problem when the line waiting for the traffic lights starts at the freeway. So the freeway becomes clogged, and the more exits there are, the more chances there are this happens somewhere.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2007, 08:55 PM   #1424
Chicagoago
Registered User
 
Chicagoago's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,707
Likes (Received): 1451

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddington View Post
In some cities like Chicago they build too many expressway exits. The ramps are really small, and as soon as an exit/entrance ramp ends another exit/entrance ramp starts. This is why the traffic is so bad in the mornings, IMO.



On the newer urban/suburban expressways they do a better job of keeping the expressway exits at least a mile apart. When I drive to work in Columbus, there's some slowdown near the expressway exits (as people try to merge, and those on the right most lane try to get out), but the difference is that in Chicago, the expressway exits are often continuous without gaps in between so the entire expressway becomes slow.
I live in Chicago and agree. They actually tore out each and every one of those bridges the past few years and put up new onces with much better detail and decore. They also tore out a few of the ramps to improve the traffic flow. It was much needed.



You can see the new red railings in this view...and one of the older bridges behind it (that hadn't been replaced yet)
Chicagoago no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 26th, 2007, 09:05 PM   #1425
Northsider
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 4,522
Likes (Received): 121

Boston's $14.8B Big Dig Finally Complete

When the clock runs out on 2007, Boston will quietly mark the end of one of the most tumultuous eras in the city's history: The Big Dig, the nation's most complex and costliest highway project, will officially come to an end.

After a history marked by engineering triumphs, tunnels leaks, epic traffic jams, last year's death of a motorist crushed by falling concrete panels and a price tag that soared from $2.6 billion to a staggering $14.8 billion, there's little appetite for celebration.

Civil and criminal cases stemming from the July 2006 tunnel ceiling collapse continue, though on Monday the family of Milena Del Valle announced a $6 million settlement with Powers Fasteners, the company that manufactured the epoxy blamed by investigators for the accident. Lawsuits are pending against other Big Dig contractors, and Powers Fasteners still faces a manslaughter indictment.

Officially, Dec. 31 marks the end of the joint venture that teamed megaproject contractor Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff with the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority to build the dizzying array of underground highways, bridges, ramps and a new tunnel under Boston Harbor all while the city remained open for business.

The project was so complex it's been likened to performing open heart surgery on a patient while the patient is wide awake.

Some didn't know if they'd live to see it end.

Enza Merola had a front row seat on the Big Dig from the front window of her pastry shop stacked neatly with tiramisu, sfogliatelle and brightly colored Italian cookies in Boston's North End.

During the toughest days of the project, the facade of Marie's Pastry Shop, named after her sister, was obscured from view. The only way customers could find the front door was along a treacherous path through heavy construction.

"For a while we thought we weren't going to make it," Merola said. "But you know, we hung in there."

The Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Project as the Big Dig is officially known has its roots in the construction of the hulking 1950's era elevated Central Artery that cut a swath through the center of Boston, lopping off the waterfront from downtown and casting a shadow over some of the city's oldest neighborhoods.

Read more...
Northsider no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 11:14 AM   #1426
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Boston's Big Dig - nation's costliest highway project - comes to an end
25 December 2007

BOSTON (AP) - When the clock runs out on 2007, Boston will quietly mark the end of one of the most tumultuous eras in the city's history: The Big Dig, the nation's most complex and costliest highway project, will officially come to an end.

Don't expect any champagne toasts.

After a history marked by engineering triumphs, tunnels leaks, epic traffic jams, last year's death of a motorist crushed by falling concrete panels and a price tag that soared from $2.6 billion to a staggering $14.8 billion, there's little appetite for celebration.

Civil and criminal cases stemming from the July 2006 tunnel ceiling collapse continue, though on Monday the family of Milena Del Valle announced a $6 million settlement with Powers Fasteners, the company that manufactured the epoxy blamed by investigators for the accident. Lawsuits are pending against other Big Dig contractors, and Powers Fasteners still faces a manslaughter indictment.

Officially, Dec. 31 marks the end of the joint venture that teamed megaproject contractor Bechtel/Parsons Brinckerhoff with the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority to build the dizzying array of underground highways, bridges, ramps and a new tunnel under Boston Harbor -- all while the city remained open for business.

The project was so complex it's been likened to performing open heart surgery on a patient while the patient is wide awake.

Some didn't know if they'd live to see it end.

Enza Merola had a front row seat on the Big Dig from the front window of her pastry shop -- stacked neatly with tiramisu, sfogliatelle and brightly colored Italian cookies -- in Boston's North End.

During the toughest days of the project, the facade of Marie's Pastry Shop, named after her sister, was obscured from view. The only way customers could find the front door was along a treacherous path through heavy construction.

"For a while we thought we weren't going to make it," Merola said. "But you know, we hung in there."

The Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Project -- as the Big Dig is officially known -- has its roots in the construction of the hulking 1950's era elevated Central Artery that cut a swath through the center of Boston, lopping off the waterfront from downtown and casting a shadow over some of the city's oldest neighborhoods.

Almost as soon as the ribbon was cut on the elevated highway in 1959, many were already wishing it away.

One was Frederick Salvucci, a city kid for whom the demolition of the old Central Artery became a lifelong quest.

"It was always a beautiful city, but it had this ugly scar through it," said Salvucci, state transportation secretary during the project's planning stages.

Rather than build a new elevated highway, Salvucci and others pushed a far more radical solution -- burying it.

Easier said than done.

Those who built the Big Dig would have to undertake the massive highway project in the cramped confines of Boston's narrow, winding streets, some dating to pre-Colonial days.

Of all the project's Rubik's Cube-like engineering challenges, none was more daunting than the first -- how to build a wider tunnel directly underneath a narrower existing elevated highway while preventing the overhead highway from collapsing.

To solve the problem, engineers created horizontal braces as wide as the new tunnel, then cut away the elevated highway's original metal struts and gently lowered them onto the braces -- even as cars crawled along overhead, their drivers oblivious to the work below.

It was the just one of what would be referred to as the Big Dig's "engineering marvels."

The Big Dig's long history is also littered with wrong turns -- some unavoidable, others self-inflicted.

One of the biggest occurred in 2004 when water started pouring through a wall of the recently opened I-93 tunnel under downtown Boston. An investigation found the leak was caused by the failure to clear debris that became caught in the concrete in the wall during construction. Hundreds of smaller drips, most near the ceiling, were also found.

Some delays were unrelated to construction.

The Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge -- the project's signature element -- went through dozens of revisions as designers labored to come up with the most practical and elegant way to cross the Charles River.

But the project's darkest day came near the end of construction in 2006 when suspended concrete ceiling panels in a tunnel leading to Logan Airport collapsed, crushing a car and killing Del Valle, 39, a passenger in the vehicle driven by her husband.

The tunnel was shut down for months as each of the remaining panels was inspected and a new fastening system installed. A federal investigation blamed the use of the wrong kind of epoxy and the Massachusetts attorney general indicted the epoxy manufacturer.

Four workers also were killed working on the project. During peak construction, more than 5,000 workers labored daily on the project.

The project's escalating budget also became an unwanted part of its legacy.

In 2000, former Big Dig head James Kerasiotes resigned after failing to disclose $1.4 billion in overruns. A frustrated Congress capped the federal contribution.

"It never should have taken so long. It never should have been so expensive," said former Gov. Michael Dukakis, who left office just as major construction was to begin.

For those who grew up with the noise and clutter of the old Central Artery, the transformation of downtown Boston is still a wonder to behold.

The darkened parking lots under the old elevated highway have been replaced by parks, dubbed the Rose Kennedy Fitzgerald Greenway after the mother of Sen. Edward Kennedy, who grew up in the North End. Buildings that once turned their backs to the old Central Artery are finding ways to open their doors to the parkway.

Mayor Thomas Menino, who presided over the city during most of the construction, said that for the first time in half a century, residents can walk from City Hall to the waterfront without trudging under a major highway.

"When I came into office in 1993, people said your city isn't going to survive," he said. "Now we have a beautiful open space in the heart of the city. It knits the downtown with the waterfront. All those dire predictions by the experts didn't come true."

Drivers also give the Big Dig a big thumbs up.

A study by the Turnpike Authority found the Big Dig cut the average trip through Boston from 19.5 minutes to 2.8 minutes.

"Before we drive bumper to bumper, but now they are moving very well," said Gamal Ahmed, 38, who has been driving a cab in Boston for seven years. "Sometimes we are stuck, but not like before."

For Salvucci, who warns gridlock could soon return without a major commitment to public transportation, the Big Dig -- for all its whiz-bang engineering -- was always second to the city itself.

"The Big Dig is not a highway with an incidental city adjacent to it. It is a living city that happens to have some major highway infrastructure within it and that highway infrastructure had to be rebuilt," he said. "This was not elective surgery. It had to be done."

--------

Associated Press writer Rodrique Ngowi contributed to this report.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 11:14 AM   #1427
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Important dates in the history of the Big Dig
25 December 2007
AP

Some important dates in the history of Boston's Big Dig highway project:

1982 -- Original estimate for the project pegged at $2.6 billion.

1987 -- Congress approves initial federal funding.

1991 -- Construction begins on Ted Williams Tunnel beneath Boston Harbor.

1995 -- Ted Williams Tunnel under Boston Harbor to Logan Airport opens.

1998 -- Cost estimate jumps to $10.8 billion.

1999 -- Big Dig Chief James Kerasiotes step down for failing to disclose cost overruns.

2002 -- Leonard P. Zakim Bunker Hill Bridge over the Charles River is completed.

2003 -- I-90 connector tunnel and the northbound and southbound lanes of I-93 tunnel open.

2004 -- Leak sends water pouring into I-93 tunnel, highlighting ongoing leak problems.

2005 -- Investigators find 169 defective panels in I-93 tunnel, most needing minor repairs;

May 2006 -- Six men who worked for the Big Dig's largest concrete supplier are arrested on charges they falsified records to hide the inferior quality of concrete.

June -- Main Big Dig tunnel dedicated for late House Speaker Thomas P. "Tip" O'Neill Jr.

July 10 -- A woman is crushed to death by falling ceiling panels in connector tunnel leading to Ted Williams Tunnel, sparking criminal investigations.

Aug. 5 -- Big Dig Chief Matthew Amorello forced out in wake of ceiling panel collapse.

Aug. 8, 2007 -- Epoxy supplier indicted in connection with ceiling panel collapse.

Dec. 24 -- Family of Milena Del Valle announces $6 million settlement with the epoxy supplier for her death.

Dec. 31 -- Big Dig comes to an end as an active construction project.

Source: Massachusetts Turnpike Authority and Associated Press news reports
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 11:15 AM   #1428
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Big Dig Figures
By The Associated Press
25 December 2007

Figures associated with Boston's Big Dig highway project:

Original cost estimate: $2.6 billion

Current cost estimate: $14.798 billion

Length of project: 7.5 miles, about half in tunnels

Amount of dirt removed: 16 million cubic yards

Number of workers at peak construction: 5,000

Number of workers killed: 4

Number of lanes on the old elevated highway: 6

Number of lanes on the new highway system: 8-10

Number of historic artifacts excavated from the Big Dig's path: 200,000

Weight of the project's final environmental impact report: 44 pounds

Number of leaks discovered in roof-wall joints in 2004: 2,000 to 3,000

Number of cars using the old elevated highway when it opened in 1959: 75,000/day

Number of cars expected to use the new underground highway by 2010: 245,000/day

Average trip through the center of Boston on the old Central Artery: 19.5 minutes

Average trip through the center of Boston using the Big Dig: 2.8 minutes.

Source: Massachusetts Turnpike Authority and Associated Press news reports
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 11:16 AM   #1429
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Engineering Feats Connected With Big Dig
By The Associated Press
25 December 2007

Some engineering feats associated with Boston's Big Dig project:

-- Tunnel Jacking.

Part of the project called for a tunnel extension under an active Amtrak railroad. Project managers realized the soil was so unstable that the rail lines could collapse. Engineers built a gigantic concrete box open on both ends, froze the soil using hundreds of rods and nudged -- or jacked -- the box under the railroad a few feet at a time. The top of the box supported the rail lines, the inside became part of the tunnel.

-- Slurry Wall Construction.

The Big Dig featured the most extensive use of slurry wall construction in North America. To create the tunnel walls in downtown Boston, excavators dug a narrow trench, sometimes more than 100 feet down. To keep the trench walls from collapsing, a thick slurry mixture was pumped into it. The slurry was then displaced as the trench was filled with concrete.

-- Supporting the Old Elevated Highway.

To keep the old six-lane elevated highway running as they built an eight to 10 lane tunnel directly underneath, project officials had to devise a way to remove the old support columns without the elevated highway collapsing. The solution? Build wider horizontal supports, then cut away the bottom parts of the original struts and lower them onto the new horizontal braces, shifting the entire weight of the overhead highway onto the new horizontal braces.

-- Casting Basin.

Building a tunnel under Fort Point Channel, an extension of Boston Harbor into South Boston, proved to be another challenge. The channel was too narrow to float in tunnel sections, so engineers built a massive casting basin or dry dock to build the concrete sections on site. The basin was then flooded and the section floated and sunk exactly into place -- no second attempts possible.

Source: Massachusetts Turnpike Authority and Associated Press news reports
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 12:32 PM   #1430
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

It´s not completely fair to compare 1982 2.6 billion dollars to 2007 14.8 billion dollars.

There is a lot of inflation since 1982.

according to inflationdata.com the inflation between 1982 and 2007 was 114.65%.

Ofcourse, it´s still a huge rise from the initially budget, though it´s very hard, not to mention impossible to calculate the costs 25 years beforehand.

And every major infrastructure project becomes more expensive over the years. (besides inflation). Those 1982 2.6 billion was more a nice sale talk probably. We have the same thing happening in the Netherlands or other European countries. It's something you can expect, especially in this ambitious big dig project, one of the largest civil-engineering projects ever.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 05:43 PM   #1431
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,844
Likes (Received): 18132

Quite amazing that the government was willing to continue with the plan and pay for it despite the cost overruns, but that may also mean other cities are not likely going to get support for similar yet needed projects in the future.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 05:48 PM   #1432
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

Yeah, but what are you gonna do? Stop halfway the construction? That would be even more a waste of money.

What was the real problem here?
Some unforeseen costs, or a scam or fraud?
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 06:00 PM   #1433
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,572
Likes (Received): 19366

I see on wikipedia the 2,6 billion figure was only a first estimate. When construction began, it was estimated at 5,8 billion. Now it costed nearly 15 billion dollars.

According to inflationdata.com the inflation between 1991 (start construction) and 2007 was about 50%. That means the initial estimate was 8,7 billion 2007 dollars. Now they spend 15 billion dollars, which is a cost overrun of 6 billion dollars or nearly 70%.

To compare; the Channel Tunnel between England and France had a 80% cost overrun, and is by far not profitable.

I don't see it's that bad, spread out the 15 billion dollars over the 16 years of construction you spend almost 1 billion a year, which should not be a very big problem for Massachusetts or federal funding.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 09:34 PM   #1434
Chicagoago
Registered User
 
Chicagoago's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,707
Likes (Received): 1451

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
Before starting the war in some other Middle Eastern country, try to repair your interstates Or you can do the above two things simultaneously if you raise the taxes, but Americans wouldn't like this idea for sure.

For the most part, individual states are responsible for the roads, not the federal government. The Fed's are around to protect us, help with infrastructure improvements, and regulate the economy. I think people forget that Americans deal with their state government in their every day lives, not really the federal government.

Health...education....roads...etc. These are all up to individual states. That's why some states have HORRIBLE roads, then you drive across the line into another state and it's suddenly much much better. Honestly though, people in the US are just use to it, they don't really care if the road is COMPLETELY smooth and in excellent shape. I just drove back through rural Illinois and saw a few potholes, and the road was full of cracks. I really didn't even give it a second thought, it just was what it was. Unless your car is being damaged or it's REALLY bumpy, I don't think people bother to get upset...
Chicagoago no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 09:38 PM   #1435
RawLee
Registered User
 
RawLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Budapest
Posts: 9,447
Likes (Received): 1083

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoago View Post
For the most part, individual states are responsible for the roads, not the federal government. The Fed's are around to protect us, help with infrastructure improvements, and regulate the economy. I think people forget that Americans deal with their state government in their every day lives, not really the federal government.

Health...education....roads...etc. These are all up to individual states. That's why some states have HORRIBLE roads, then you drive across the line into another state and it's suddenly much much better. Honestly though, people in the US are just use to it, they don't really care if the road is COMPLETELY smooth and in excellent shape. I just drove back through rural Illinois and saw a few potholes, and the road was full of cracks. I really didn't even give it a second thought, it just was what it was. Unless your car is being damaged or it's REALLY bumpy, I don't think people bother to get upset...
Just dont neglect maintenance until something similar happens as with that ominous bridge...
RawLee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 27th, 2007, 09:48 PM   #1436
scalziand
Naugatuckian
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Naugatuck, CT
Posts: 455
Likes (Received): 181

Along with all the uncompleted ones, 10rot?
scalziand no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 03:04 AM   #1437
TheCat
IsraCanadian :)
 
TheCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 1,358
Likes (Received): 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoago View Post
For the most part, individual states are responsible for the roads, not the federal government. The Fed's are around to protect us, help with infrastructure improvements, and regulate the economy. I think people forget that Americans deal with their state government in their every day lives, not really the federal government.

Health...education....roads...etc. These are all up to individual states. That's why some states have HORRIBLE roads, then you drive across the line into another state and it's suddenly much much better. Honestly though, people in the US are just use to it, they don't really care if the road is COMPLETELY smooth and in excellent shape. I just drove back through rural Illinois and saw a few potholes, and the road was full of cracks. I really didn't even give it a second thought, it just was what it was. Unless your car is being damaged or it's REALLY bumpy, I don't think people bother to get upset...
Yeah, Canada is very similar since the provinces are responsible for the roads. You drive on Highway 401 in Ontario, and then suddenly you cross into Quebec (where the 401 becomes A20), and suddenly the pavement quality deteriorates.
__________________
Check out my driving videos on Youtube | Please visit the Highways & Autobahns forum
TheCat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 03:47 AM   #1438
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,665
Likes (Received): 1261

Ohio's roads are generally in good condition. They also tend to have plenty of capacity (lanes), and less problems with traffic than other states.

The state DOT also does a good job with standards like plenty of ramp space, adequate signage, and good sized shoulders.
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 03:52 AM   #1439
go_leafs_go02
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: London/Hamilton, Canada
Posts: 490
Likes (Received): 2

Ohio is my favourite state in terms of roads that I've driven on. I haven't been to many..only about 12, 13 states. But Ohio definitely has the best standard.

Kentucky isn't bad either.

Michigan is TERRIBLE.
go_leafs_go02 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 07:41 AM   #1440
Brisbaner21
Sunshine City
 
Brisbaner21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Posts: 2,336
Likes (Received): 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by go_leafs_go02 View Post
Ohio is my favourite state in terms of roads that I've driven on. I haven't been to many..only about 12, 13 states. But Ohio definitely has the best standard.

Kentucky isn't bad either.

Michigan is TERRIBLE.
That is exactly what I thought, Ohio has some really nice ones, along with North Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, but Pennsylvania, Michigan and New York's were terrible.
Brisbaner21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
america, california, highway, highways, interstate, los angeles, united states, urban

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium