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Old January 15th, 2008, 12:45 PM   #1521
ChrisZwolle
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Pics of the I-80 from Sacramento to Oakland.

Is this a metric unit?
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Old January 15th, 2008, 01:12 PM   #1522
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I renamed the thread into a more comprehensive Interstate 80 in California thread.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 01:29 PM   #1523
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Quote:
Panel: Increase gas tax to fix roadways

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A special commission is urging the government to raise federal gasoline taxes by as much as 40 cents per gallon over five years as part of a sweeping overhaul designed to ease traffic congestion and repair the nation's decaying bridges and roads.

The two-year study being released Tuesday by the National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission, the first to recommend broad changes after the devastating bridge collapse in Minnesota last August, warns that urgent action is needed to avoid future disasters.

Under the recommendation, the current tax of 18.4 cents per gallon for unleaded gasoline would be increased annually for five years -- by anywhere from 5 cents to 8 cents each year -- and then indexed to inflation afterward to help fix the infrastructure, expand public transit and highways as well as broaden railway and rural access, according to persons with direct knowledge of the report, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the report is not yet public.
I guess there will be a lot of opposition to this, but i think it's a good thing. It encourages people to buy more fuel-efficient cars, instead of those gas-eating monsters, plus the taxes will be spend on roads, which is often not the case in Europe, where gas prices are much higher than in the United States.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 03:04 PM   #1524
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
I guess there will be a lot of opposition to this, but i think it's a good thing. It encourages people to buy more fuel-efficient cars, instead of those gas-eating monsters, plus the taxes will be spend on roads, which is often not the case in Europe, where gas prices are much higher than in the United States.
Sadly in the United States car is the only choice people have to get to where they need to go in a timely fashion. Hell if I rode my bike to the closest grocery store it would take at least an 30 minutes each way. There is no bus service to my apartment and no rail service to speak of. Taking the Amtrak from Austin to Dallas is a 6 hour trip when by car it's about 3 hours and 30 minutes.

Going to Italy last year and the U.K. before really impressed me on how the whole continent seems to be perfectly networked with efficient bus and rail service.

I spout all this but everyone already knows how bad public transportation is in the United States.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 03:09 PM   #1525
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Sadly in the United States car is the only choice people have to get to where they need to go in a timely fashion. Hell if I rode my bike to the closest grocery store it would take at least an 30 minutes each way. There is no bus service to my apartment and no rail service to speak of. Taking the Amtrak from Austin to Dallas is a 6 hour trip when by car it's about 3 hours and 30 minutes.

Going to Italy last year and the U.K. before really impressed me on how the whole continent seems to be perfectly networked with efficient bus and rail service.

I spout all this but everyone already knows how bad public transportation is in the United States.
You're thinking only in terms of passenger service. What about Semi Trucks? We will always need Semis on the road and they will always be needed for our just in time logistics that we love so much. You can't stick a million bikes outside a major distribution center and expect them to deliver the goods. Our Interstates are truly vital for our Freight and no amount of "public transportation" will stop the ever growing demand for trucks that are joining the roads.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 03:11 PM   #1526
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Going to Italy last year and the U.K. before really impressed me on how the whole continent seems to be perfectly networked with efficient bus and rail service.
aaaaahahahahahaahahaha
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Old January 15th, 2008, 03:25 PM   #1527
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aaaaahahahahahaahahaha
Ok, maybe Italy could use some improvement with their strike situations.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 04:00 PM   #1528
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The I-80 between SF and Sac is one of the most traveled roads. I've been on it a fair few times (to visit friends at UC Davis), and I have to admit, its pretty crap, but no worse than roads I usually use. (read 101 between SF and San Jose).

Perhaps because of that I didn't notice. One thing I did notice was the sheer amount of traffic. Despite it being a significant stretch, all the lanes were filled and I couldn't find the room to go faster than 70.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 05:13 PM   #1529
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Public Transportation might be available a lot more in Europe, but it definatly isn't fast for commuting, except in large agglomerations of over 1 million.

The fact that there are so many traffic jams in the Netherlands has nothing to do with people loving their car, it's just that public transportation isn't a good alternative.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 05:47 PM   #1530
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Interesting fact for those who say Public transportation is better for the environment;

In the Dutch city of Haarlem (population 147.000, part of a 7 million agglomeration), they found 85 buses caused 50% of the NO2 pollution in the entire city. They switched the old Diesel buses for natural gas-powered buses, and the NO2 pollution in the city dropped a stunning 50%! And it's not like these old buses were old diesel crap, the were euro 4-category buses, which is the second highest category in fuel efficiency and pollution.

To sum up, 85 buses caused 50% of the traffic pollution of NO2. These buses have usually a low ridership, causing a pollution per traveller-mile that might be even higher than your average SUV.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 05:49 PM   #1531
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Which is why we need to bring back/introduce/expand electric trolley service.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 05:57 PM   #1532
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Trolley buses are unnecessary expensive and not very flexible. If something happens why the bus cannot drive, the whole network has a problem, something that doesn't happen with regular buses.

Natural Gas buses can be a good solution.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 06:18 PM   #1533
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NO2 is not the only pollution caused by transportation. Your statistics are skewed.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 06:22 PM   #1534
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Ofcourse not. But it is one of the most important. (together with SO2 and PM10).

I was not talking about pollution in general, but strictly to NO2 pollution in particular.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 06:24 PM   #1535
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So we have to look at total partical pollution for that area, not just NO2, the statistics probably say something different.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 06:25 PM   #1536
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
Trolley buses are unnecessary expensive and not very flexible. If something happens why the bus cannot drive, the whole network has a problem, something that doesn't happen with regular buses.

Natural Gas buses can be a good solution.


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Old January 15th, 2008, 06:33 PM   #1537
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There will be riots in the streets if fuel taxes were raised.

Not that I would be against it. While it would burn my pocket more, seeing the current state of our highways, at this point it is inevitable. It's bad in the short run, but very good in the long run.

I wonder how much I would pay for...the closest gas station to my place is $3.37/gal ($0.89/liter)...I guess it would be near $1/liter if implemented.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 07:17 PM   #1538
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
The fact that there are so many traffic jams in the Netherlands has nothing to do with people loving their car, it's just that public transportation isn't a good alternative.
Everyone should stay at home.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 07:33 PM   #1539
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I wonder how much I would pay for...the closest gas station to my place is $3.37/gal ($0.89/liter)...I guess it would be near $1/liter if implemented.
The motorway gas stations charge $ 2,23 per liter. Somewhat cheaper unmanned ones charge $ 2,07 per liter in the Netherlands. So you guys really have nothing to complain about
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Old January 15th, 2008, 08:14 PM   #1540
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
Trolley buses are unnecessary expensive and not very flexible. If something happens why the bus cannot drive, the whole network has a problem, something that doesn't happen with regular buses.
That's not completely true. They can merge 3,5 metres to each side, so if there's just one lane blocked they can pass by. Plus, they have a reserve engine which in case of emergency can be used (which makes an extremely amount of noise, so you really want to avoid that).
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