daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old February 28th, 2008, 12:22 PM   #1741
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

Yes i did.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old February 28th, 2008, 08:31 PM   #1742
Zibou
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27
Likes (Received): 0

Hello,

About of the New Jersey / Trenton area, has work begun on the NJ Turnpike (I-95) / Trenton Bypass (I-295 ?) ? When will it be fully operational, with the completion of the missing I-95 section ?
Zibou no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 28th, 2008, 09:55 PM   #1743
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

I don't think they are building anything there. As far as i know, they are rerouting the I-95 via the Pennsylvania Turnpike south of Trenton to the I-95. It requires a new interchange with the I-95/I-276 between Philadelphia and Trenton.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old February 29th, 2008, 10:18 PM   #1744
Billpa
Beer is a Tasty Treat
 
Billpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Harrisburg
Posts: 767
Likes (Received): 7

This has got to be the Thickest arrow I've ever seen....


image hosted on flickr
Billpa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 29th, 2008, 10:34 PM   #1745
xXFallenXx
Registered User
 
xXFallenXx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Temecula, CA
Posts: 3,862
Likes (Received): 170

I've seen thinker.
xXFallenXx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 01:39 AM   #1746
Galls
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 107
Likes (Received): 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billpa View Post
Interstate 410 in San Antonio, Texas. How very American:

image hosted on flickr
I have noticed in my travels that states which have excellent access to highways, and relatively congestion free highways. Have very fat people and a non-existent community.
Galls no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 02:21 AM   #1747
Tom 958
Registered User
 
Tom 958's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: near Atlanta
Posts: 786
Likes (Received): 163

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
I don't think they are building anything there. As far as i know, they are rerouting the I-95 via the Pennsylvania Turnpike south of Trenton to the I-95. It requires a new interchange with the I-95/I-276 between Philadelphia and Trenton.
And it's a TOTSO-- arrrgh!
Tom 958 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 04:08 AM   #1748
Rail Claimore
Registered User
 
Rail Claimore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 1,152
Likes (Received): 14

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billpa View Post
I do think Clearview is better than the old font, but I think I'll miss the older stuff if we ever go "all clearview, all the time".

image hosted on flickr
That must have been installed recently. I last traveled on that stretch of road a few months ago, and it still had the old highway gothic signs.
Rail Claimore no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 04:11 AM   #1749
Billpa
Beer is a Tasty Treat
 
Billpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Harrisburg
Posts: 767
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by Galls View Post
I have noticed in my travels that states which have excellent access to highways, and relatively congestion free highways. Have very fat people and a non-existent community.
That's so true. More fat in San Antonio than in NYC one would imagine.
Billpa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 06:26 AM   #1750
phattonez
Bleed Dodger Blue
 
phattonez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: The City of Angels
Posts: 1,773
Likes (Received): 38

Galls, that place looks like a mess. So ugly, I can't believe that no one argued against that on aesthetic grounds.
__________________
“Violence is not necessary to destroy a civilization. Each civilization dies from
indifference toward the unique values which created it.” - Nicolás Gómez Dávila

"A wicked man puts up a bold front, but an upright man gives thought to his ways." - Proverbs 21: 29
phattonez no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 09:15 AM   #1751
Galls
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 107
Likes (Received): 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by phattonez View Post
Galls, that place looks like a mess. So ugly, I can't believe that no one argued against that on aesthetic grounds.

I actually think that very intersection was covered in a history channel program, modern marvels, Superhighways. It is just a shame that some people see that as a benefit to society, if anything in philosophical terms it is the death of society.
Galls no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 10:54 AM   #1752
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

I don't think there is a direct relation between fatness and traffic congestion. Like someone who otherwise is in a traffic jam would walk or cycle 15 miles to work instead. The Netherlands is full of congestion, yet most people are too fat here too. I think it has more to do with the western way of living than congestion or freeways per se.

Ofcourse, people might walk more if a neighborhood is pedestrian-friendly, but i don't think anyone is gonna walk over a mile for groceries or to go to work. The problem might be when people take their car for ultra-short distances, instead of walking, but those generally do not include freeways or congestion anyway, so i think it's hard to prove congestion has something to do with the level of fatness.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 05:10 PM   #1753
Galls
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 107
Likes (Received): 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
I don't think there is a direct relation between fatness and traffic congestion. Like someone who otherwise is in a traffic jam would walk or cycle 15 miles to work instead. The Netherlands is full of congestion, yet most people are too fat here too. I think it has more to do with the western way of living than congestion or freeways per se.

Ofcourse, people might walk more if a neighborhood is pedestrian-friendly, but i don't think anyone is gonna walk over a mile for groceries or to go to work. The problem might be when people take their car for ultra-short distances, instead of walking, but those generally do not include freeways or congestion anyway, so i think it's hard to prove congestion has something to do with the level of fatness.
While what you say is true, highways could just be symptoms of a way of life, or one of a multitude of reason that cause increase in fat in those areas. When you look at that picture you can definitly assume that no one, even if they are down the street, will walk.
Galls no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 05:25 PM   #1754
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

I don't think there are such great differences between European and American cities, while the latter (especially in the Midwest) have quite huge freeway/roadsystems. For instance, it is not usually for people in the Netherlands, to walk to work/groceries/dinner etc, except in historic city centers, but they often park their car nearby.

It is more usual to take the bicycle, but that's because distances are relatively short. If distances are over 3 - 4 miles, people tend to favor the car. Given the fact that cities like San Antonio, Houston or Dallas are very large in area, i don't think it's weird not many people walk. It's just not a pedestrian-friendly environment, not because of the lack of pavements, but just because of the distances.

Well, maybe fatness can be related to traffic congestion, in the way that people are stuck in traffic jams such a long time, they aren't able to spend time in the gym. Or they have usually office jobs, which do not require much energy in a physical way.

To be frank, i never quite understand those "drive-thru" things, it creates an individual atmosphere too much.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 06:00 PM   #1755
Billpa
Beer is a Tasty Treat
 
Billpa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Harrisburg
Posts: 767
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
To be frank, i never quite understand those "drive-thru" things, it creates an individual atmosphere too much.
Not only that, it's common to see people going to the mall driving around the parking lot looking for a space close to the front door- when there are hundreds of unused spaces just a bit futher on- something that would require an extra 30 or 60 seconds of walking. By the time they find that nearby parking spot they could've already been in the mall PLUS they would've shed a couple of calories off that drive-thru meal they just consumed.
Billpa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 06:45 PM   #1756
Galls
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 107
Likes (Received): 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
I don't think there are such great differences between European and American cities, while the latter (especially in the Midwest) have quite huge freeway/roadsystems. For instance, it is not usually for people in the Netherlands, to walk to work/groceries/dinner etc, except in historic city centers, but they often park their car nearby.

It is more usual to take the bicycle, but that's because distances are relatively short. If distances are over 3 - 4 miles, people tend to favor the car. Given the fact that cities like San Antonio, Houston or Dallas are very large in area, i don't think it's weird not many people walk. It's just not a pedestrian-friendly environment, not because of the lack of pavements, but just because of the distances.

Well, maybe fatness can be related to traffic congestion, in the way that people are stuck in traffic jams such a long time, they aren't able to spend time in the gym. Or they have usually office jobs, which do not require much energy in a physical way.

To be frank, i never quite understand those "drive-thru" things, it creates an individual atmosphere too much.
Well I was arguing that the more congested the highway is in the city, the less likely you are gonna have a large fat population. Because it becomes a situation where the perceived benefits of having a car are negated by the time consumption of congestion, leading to a greater reliance on walking, biking, public transit. And there has been a positive link between alternative transit and health.
Galls no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 08:56 PM   #1757
ADCS
Kickin' it
 
ADCS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Screwston, Plexus
Posts: 508
Likes (Received): 37

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
It is more usual to take the bicycle, but that's because distances are relatively short. If distances are over 3 - 4 miles, people tend to favor the car. Given the fact that cities like San Antonio, Houston or Dallas are very large in area, i don't think it's weird not many people walk. It's just not a pedestrian-friendly environment, not because of the lack of pavements, but just because of the distances.
I guess the counterpoint to that is that the distances themselves are there because of the highways. Whereas before no one would build too far out from population centers because no one could travel that far, after the automobile caught on and improved highways were built, developers could take advantage of the cheap land on the periphery of the cities. This created that lovely vicious circle of low-density development we call sprawl.
ADCS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 10:13 PM   #1758
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

Yeah urban sprawl is definatly not a way to fight congestion, however, some Midwest cities only suffer light traffic congestion, while they sprawl like hell. But they don't have natural boundaries, like coasts, rivers and mountains, which usually create mass flows of traffic, instead of evenly distributed traffic.

Freeways definatly support urban sprawl, but also the fact that ground is cheap, and there are lots of it, in contrast with Europe, where open fields als considered "scarce", however, that is often overrated. Even in a high density population country like the Netherlands, 85% of the area is unbuild.

Los Angeles is kinda dense, in fact, more dense than a lot of mid-size European cities. But when you look at outer suburbs, like in Atlanta or New Jersey, man that's really not dense, meaning cycling is out of the question, and public transportation is also not very effective for reasonable costs. However, i think those low density suburban neighborhoods in the woods are pretty comfortable and nice to live in.

A lot of people despise suburbs, i can understand the thought why people (families) prefer this kind of housing. Personally, i am more of an apartment kind of guy.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 10:14 PM   #1759
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,595
Likes (Received): 19389

oops double
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2008, 10:27 PM   #1760
KIWIKAAS
Registered User
 
KIWIKAAS's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: The Hague
Posts: 4,521
Likes (Received): 751

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
I don't think there are such great differences between European and American cities, while the latter (especially in the Midwest) have quite huge freeway/roadsystems. For instance, it is not usually for people in the Netherlands, to walk to work/groceries/dinner etc, except in historic city centers, but they often park their car nearby.
.
I think there are huge differences between European and American cities. Infact I struggle to find much resemblence at all.
European suburbia is generally very dense. Freestanding houses with garage and driveway are extremely rare in Europe. The larger cities are full of apartment blocks. A typical outer fringe suburb in Europe would probably have a similar density to inner city suburbs in America.
KIWIKAAS no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
america, california, highway, highways, interstate, los angeles, united states, urban

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium