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Old October 26th, 2008, 07:47 AM   #1321
kyle@1008
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Originally Posted by icarus-rising View Post
Whoa! Hehehe. Then they should learn only coņotic Filipino.

But most of those that I speak to say it's because Tagalog-based Filipino alienates them from their culture and mother tongue. So English probably doesn't?
well if they're mother tounge is not tagalog, but most tagalogs of the younger gen consider tagalog as baduy.....except for staunch nationalists of course..
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Old October 26th, 2008, 07:47 AM   #1322
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Originally Posted by icarus-rising View Post
Whoa! Hehehe. Then they should learn only coņotic Filipino.

But most of those that I speak to say it's because Tagalog-based Filipino alienates them from their culture and mother tongue. So English probably doesn't?
well if they're mother tounge is not tagalog, but most tagalogs of the younger gen consider tagalog as baduy.....except for staunch nationalists of course..
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:03 AM   #1323
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Case in point, China. Standard Mandarin based on the Beijing dialect is employed all throughout China, and you don't see any vehement uprisings from other Chinese languages like Cantonese and Hokkien that are spoken within the confines of their respective provinces/regions. The Chinese people has managed to put aside their regional differences and pulled together to unite under one standard language (albeit the dialect of the nation's capital). I think the Philippines can learn something from what they did; and if they can do it, as Filipinos, we most definitely can also.
Agreed
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:03 AM   #1324
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Case in point, China. Standard Mandarin based on the Beijing dialect is employed all throughout China, and you don't see any vehement uprisings from other Chinese languages like Cantonese and Hokkien that are spoken within the confines of their respective provinces/regions. The Chinese people has managed to put aside their regional differences and pulled together to unite under one standard language (albeit the dialect of the nation's capital). I think the Philippines can learn something from what they did; and if they can do it, as Filipinos, we most definitely can also.
Agreed
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:14 AM   #1325
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Originally Posted by kyle@1008 View Post
well if they're mother tounge is not tagalog, but most tagalogs of the younger gen consider tagalog as baduy.....except for staunch nationalists of course..
The overwhelming new generation of Tagalog-speakers are still masa so I don't know who you'd been rubbing elbows with, Kyle.

My experience is that unless they know you're a foreigner or raised in a predominantly English environment, people would look at you funny if you speak English all the time. The younger gen would probably chide you by saying, "Nosebleed naman ako sa iyo." Some would mock you by repeating what you said exaggerating the accent and say, "Pwede namang mag-Tagalog 'di ba?"
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:14 AM   #1326
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Originally Posted by kyle@1008 View Post
well if they're mother tounge is not tagalog, but most tagalogs of the younger gen consider tagalog as baduy.....except for staunch nationalists of course..
The overwhelming new generation of Tagalog-speakers are still masa so I don't know who you'd been rubbing elbows with, Kyle.

My experience is that unless they know you're a foreigner or raised in a predominantly English environment, people would look at you funny if you speak English all the time. The younger gen would probably chide you by saying, "Nosebleed naman ako sa iyo." Some would mock you by repeating what you said exaggerating the accent and say, "Pwede namang mag-Tagalog 'di ba?"
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:31 AM   #1327
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nah that's what I meant, street talk may tag-lish elements plus combo words, kaya nga nosebleed diba?
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:31 AM   #1328
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nah that's what I meant, street talk may tag-lish elements plus combo words, kaya nga nosebleed diba?
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:35 AM   #1329
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Originally Posted by kyle@1008 View Post
well it's like so totoo naman kasi that filipino is like so evolving na, lam mo naman pinoys love making lenguahes,..like text talk, gay talk, conyo talk...jologs talk
all languages evolve, even in other countries. English alone is expressed differently by the Americans of the 30s and the 50s from the 20th centuries spoken english by the majority of the americans. We can consider it less formal comparing to the "yesteryear's" episodes like in the movies but we need to realize that it's part of the ever changing world, everything evolves.
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:35 AM   #1330
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Originally Posted by kyle@1008 View Post
well it's like so totoo naman kasi that filipino is like so evolving na, lam mo naman pinoys love making lenguahes,..like text talk, gay talk, conyo talk...jologs talk
all languages evolve, even in other countries. English alone is expressed differently by the Americans of the 30s and the 50s from the 20th centuries spoken english by the majority of the americans. We can consider it less formal comparing to the "yesteryear's" episodes like in the movies but we need to realize that it's part of the ever changing world, everything evolves.
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:38 AM   #1331
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yup yup agree ako dyan
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:38 AM   #1332
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yup yup agree ako dyan
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:48 AM   #1333
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I think it's also absurd that we make our colonizers' language the main lingua franca just because we don't want one local language becoming the "dominant language". Both my parents are from the Visayas and I speak thier language too. However, I tend to favor a Filipino language based on one language because it is more logical and natural to propagate. Yes Filipino based on Tagalog is flawed and I can relate to the feeling of suppression, subjugation and domination among non-Tagalog speakers when they feel "forced" to learn another language which isn't their mother tongue. However, why is it that some find it easier to embrace English and find learning mainly Tagalog-based Filipino unacceptable?

Peace to all!
I have said this words long time ago in a different thread, that is "why is it easier to embrace english or some say spanish and tagalog based Filipino as unacceptable which at times some makes it sound that they are demoralized...

Icarus is one good example for these, his heritage is from the Visayas, he embraced and is proud of him being one but at the same time, he doesn't really seems to feel that his heritage is being supressed or even defaced just because he learned how to speak tagalog. He knows he still feel he is a proud visayan and it should be that way because having one language in a country like ours just for the purpose of having a comon language we all communicate with should not make a person less of a filipino and less of a bisaya just because they learn how to speak tagalog to an average filipinos especially those whom never had an opportunity for a higher education.

We have english as a second languge and that alone helped filipinos to land a job in other countries. If a foreigner shows interests in learning our language. Why can't we be the same? we can learn bisaya or kapanpangan etc as well, I don't think it will make us less of a bisaya or kapangpangan if we learn to speak tagalog. I understand why some of us didn't feel like it should be added to the school system, it's not only the non tagalogs feel the unimportance of learning tagalog in schools, even the tagalog doesn't enjoy taking filipino classes because it's boring, as much as how americans find english classes boring as well...
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:48 AM   #1334
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Originally Posted by icarus-rising View Post
I think it's also absurd that we make our colonizers' language the main lingua franca just because we don't want one local language becoming the "dominant language". Both my parents are from the Visayas and I speak thier language too. However, I tend to favor a Filipino language based on one language because it is more logical and natural to propagate. Yes Filipino based on Tagalog is flawed and I can relate to the feeling of suppression, subjugation and domination among non-Tagalog speakers when they feel "forced" to learn another language which isn't their mother tongue. However, why is it that some find it easier to embrace English and find learning mainly Tagalog-based Filipino unacceptable?

Peace to all!
I have said this words long time ago in a different thread, that is "why is it easier to embrace english or some say spanish and tagalog based Filipino as unacceptable which at times some makes it sound that they are demoralized...

Icarus is one good example for these, his heritage is from the Visayas, he embraced and is proud of him being one but at the same time, he doesn't really seems to feel that his heritage is being supressed or even defaced just because he learned how to speak tagalog. He knows he still feel he is a proud visayan and it should be that way because having one language in a country like ours just for the purpose of having a comon language we all communicate with should not make a person less of a filipino and less of a bisaya just because they learn how to speak tagalog to an average filipinos especially those whom never had an opportunity for a higher education.

We have english as a second languge and that alone helped filipinos to land a job in other countries. If a foreigner shows interests in learning our language. Why can't we be the same? we can learn bisaya or kapanpangan etc as well, I don't think it will make us less of a bisaya or kapangpangan if we learn to speak tagalog. I understand why some of us didn't feel like it should be added to the school system, it's not only the non tagalogs feel the unimportance of learning tagalog in schools, even the tagalog doesn't enjoy taking filipino classes because it's boring, as much as how americans find english classes boring as well...

Last edited by mwg12a; October 26th, 2008 at 08:54 AM.
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:52 AM   #1335
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nah that's what I meant, street talk may tag-lish elements plus combo words, kaya nga nosebleed diba?
Conversational Tagalog has English woven into it. Some would call it "Filipino" evolving naturally. The youth doesn't speak formal Tagalog when they do street-talk of course. Not because it's baduy but because it would sound out-of-place, inappropriate. There are also words more common in circulation than others. I laughed at my housemate the other day when he said, "Ipinid ninyo ang pinto kapag umalis kayo." I said, "Ibig mo bang sabihin ay isarado?" The youth actually have high regard for pure Tagalog and use it in literature.
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:52 AM   #1336
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nah that's what I meant, street talk may tag-lish elements plus combo words, kaya nga nosebleed diba?
Conversational Tagalog has English woven into it. Some would call it "Filipino" evolving naturally. The youth doesn't speak formal Tagalog when they do street-talk of course. Not because it's baduy but because it would sound out-of-place, inappropriate. There are also words more common in circulation than others. I laughed at my housemate the other day when he said, "Ipinid ninyo ang pinto kapag umalis kayo." I said, "Ibig mo bang sabihin ay isarado?" The youth actually have high regard for pure Tagalog and use it in literature.
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A city built on a hill cannot be hidden. So also with a lamp.
People do not light a lamp and put it under a basket. But they put it on the place for a lamp. Then all the people in the house can see its light.
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:59 AM   #1337
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few people actually speak formal tagalog anymore, conversational filipino is different depends where you are, yup out-of-place ,people would actually laugh at you for speaking formal tagalog kasi nga "baduy" it has the same effect as trying to speak english to somebody, the difference is if you speak english maarte o pasosyal, while speaking in formal tagalog is "baduy" I guess that's what I meant, does that make sense...
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Old October 26th, 2008, 08:59 AM   #1338
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few people actually speak formal tagalog anymore, conversational filipino is different depends where you are, yup out-of-place ,people would actually laugh at you for speaking formal tagalog kasi nga "baduy" it has the same effect as trying to speak english to somebody, the difference is if you speak english maarte o pasosyal, while speaking in formal tagalog is "baduy" I guess that's what I meant, does that make sense...
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Old October 26th, 2008, 09:03 AM   #1339
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Originally Posted by icarus-rising View Post
Conversational Tagalog has English woven into it. Some would call it "Filipino" evolving naturally. The youth doesn't speak formal Tagalog when they do street-talk of course. Not because it's baduy but because it would sound out-of-place, inappropriate. There are also words more common in circulation than others. I laughed at my housemate the other day when he said, "Ipinid ninyo ang pinto kapag umalis kayo." I said, "Ibig mo bang sabihin ay isarado?" The youth actually have high regard for pure Tagalog and use it in literature.
Pure Tagalog or Literary Tagalog to me is nice to listen to. I remember in Highschool we had to learn Florante and Laura as required reading. It was boring, until our teacher invited an Uncle to class who is a Tagalog to show us how the lines where meant to be read...and it was like, whoah! poetic...

I noticed too that foreigners who studied Filipino in a school environment use very formal Filipino. I think it's cool...
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Old October 26th, 2008, 09:03 AM   #1340
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Originally Posted by icarus-rising View Post
Conversational Tagalog has English woven into it. Some would call it "Filipino" evolving naturally. The youth doesn't speak formal Tagalog when they do street-talk of course. Not because it's baduy but because it would sound out-of-place, inappropriate. There are also words more common in circulation than others. I laughed at my housemate the other day when he said, "Ipinid ninyo ang pinto kapag umalis kayo." I said, "Ibig mo bang sabihin ay isarado?" The youth actually have high regard for pure Tagalog and use it in literature.
Pure Tagalog or Literary Tagalog to me is nice to listen to. I remember in Highschool we had to learn Florante and Laura as required reading. It was boring, until our teacher invited an Uncle to class who is a Tagalog to show us how the lines where meant to be read...and it was like, whoah! poetic...

I noticed too that foreigners who studied Filipino in a school environment use very formal Filipino. I think it's cool...
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Last edited by higen; October 26th, 2008 at 09:09 AM.
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