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Old December 2nd, 2010, 07:26 AM   #181
mohammed wong
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lawfin View Post
Dealing with Howard I think could get a boost from a Metra station

Call your representative soon to be 48th aldeman Harry Osterman

He plans a new metra stop at peterson/ ridge / ravenswood

calling for lots more parking he says for the common good

A new station at devon and remove the one at lunt

and in its place a metra at howard tied to the CTA

would help spark redevelopment of Devon and Howard some say is all but sunk

I am for a stop at Howard too,
though not sure if I would get rid of the one at Lunt,
just cuz its closer to my place,
but in anycase will be interesting to see.

Yeah the new stop at peterson wil be cool
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Old December 2nd, 2010, 09:24 PM   #182
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What I meant to say but perhaps was unclear
is that station at peterson will bring nothing but tears
of frustration as choked traffic snarls round ravenswood ridge
we'd be far better off with a station north a few blocks by a smidge

I live near Lunt so I know how you feel
and removing it would for me would be a nearly daily deal
but metra and cta our transportation draft horses
are not personal play thing but meant to benefit the greatest masses


Take away Lunt and sure i'd be sad
but a new one at Howard
and put planned peterson at devon
and these two new stations would be much more fun



=========================

I all seriousness I think the station at Peterson is a bad idea....too isolated a nearly a quarter of a circle around it is filled by actual dead people (rosehill) who very rarely take metra....and Peterson itself is an auto sewer....Even the new development along western
at peterson is auto-centric hell...despite only being 1 mile to new proposed station and like a 5 minute bus ride.

Devon makes more sense....better for a nascent business strip east on devon; good for business strip west on devon...good for S&C; also empty lot south of devon could be developed into TOD / possible parking structure...also that horrible parcel in no-mans land between ridge and metra via-duct couild be redeveloped to take advantage of TOD....also their are way more people within say 1/2 mile radius of that devon spot than at Ridge / Peterson (ie the formerly mentioned dead people).

Howard and a tie in to the Red line somehow....I think is self-explanatory.


Osterman is a good guy but he is focused on the 48th ward....this issue could benefit both Edgewater and RP so much more if stations were done at Howard and Devon (remove Lunt)...and yes it would be inconvenient for me....Lunt is 2 blocks from my house..devon would be more like 5.

I urge anyone reading this to contact Schawkowsky and Osterman as well as Moore to put this idea in their heads.

Howard and Devon Metra stops would help revitalize 2 business strips; further aid in development of a 3rd nascent one; better tie into CTA redline; benefit far more people with in say 1/2 mile or so of each respective station.

A station at peterson will simply be a car magnet with little if any ancillary benefit.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 05:00 PM   #183
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wow auto sewer, good one.
on the plus side dead people make terrible nimbies....

I see your point on Howard and Devon.
It definitely would help both retail strips.
Also if Lunt did go away, I would just take the
redline from Morse to Howard and walk over.
The Howard Metra stop would be very close
to the Redline and help that intervening stretch
as well. I know alot of people have been hoping
for a Howard Metra stop. And it would especially
help out that stretch of Howard west of the
Metra Line. It is so dead over there.

With the Devon Stop it would help that kinda
dead zone between the Rogers Park area
and West Ridge business districts.
There is a cool sign there now
displaying Rogers Park and Edgewater.
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Old December 14th, 2010, 10:05 PM   #184
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South of Devon so technically Edgewater, but seems to make more sense here:

Loyola University Chicago recently snapped up the site of a proposed condominium building near its Rogers Park campus for $940,000, less than the debt on the vacant parcel.

The university paid about $52 per square foot for a long-vacant 18,000-square-foot site at the northwest corner of Broadway Avenue and Rosemont Avenue, about a block from the university’s campus, according to real estate firm Titan Commercial LLC, which represented Loyola in the transaction.

A Loyola spokeswoman says there are currently no plans for the site, 6300 N. Broadway Ave., where residential developers once planned a five-story condo building.



Crain's story
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Old December 14th, 2010, 10:29 PM   #185
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^ I certainly hope to see something developed there. The area around Broadway/Devon as so much potential, but is unfortunately still marred by abandonment and decay.

I would imagine it is in Loyola's interest to see this part of town redeveloped into something more lively and "safe" for the benefit of their current and future students.
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Old December 15th, 2010, 03:37 AM   #186
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Yeah I put that article in the edgewater section already,
but hey, I wont complain about it being here.

Urbs, that area is getting better.
Green Element Resale down the street is cool
it was bought by a guy who is slowly rehabbing it.

Whats happening now is property that was languishing
is being bought up for future development
or by business savvy guys who know what they are doing.

There is a nice coffee shop on Devon not too far from Broadway
by Magnolia, and there is a Viet Bistro on Devon along that stretch too.
Its coming along slowly in a positive way,
If you look at clark south of devon and north of ridge alot of
buildings getting fixed up there. Dont forget Uncommon Ground
is at glenwood and devon.

And Broadway has nice antique shops already.
It'll get there........

So yeah Im Bully for Rogers Park and Edgewater.
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Old January 12th, 2011, 06:51 PM   #187
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Crown Jewels of Morse being installed.

http://morsehellhole.blogspot.com/20...installed.html

Take a look at Morse and Mayne Stage.
Its getting its new lights put in.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 09:23 PM   #188
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Devon Parking Structure nears completion at Rockwell and Devon

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/...aspx?id=176161

If alderman has his way, Devon parking structure will open by Election Day
by Karla Dawn Meier
Jan 13, 2011


Karla Dawn Meier/MEDILL

Is there an election coming up?

After seven years of controversy and setbacks, a parking structure at the corner of Devon and Rockwell in West Rogers Park is set to open, according to the alderman.

“It should be open before Election Day,” said Ald. Bernard Stone, who has championed the $16 million project. “They are just waiting for the heat to be turned on.”

Homeowners Michael and Sue Freely, who now live in the structure’s shadow, are skeptical.

“Yeah, right,” Michael Freely said. “I don’t think so. It’s definitely not finished.”

Sue Freely added: “They’ve picked up the pace the last two months, I think, just to show the neighborhood how ‘hard’ [Stone] is working. I guess that’s politics in Chicago.”

Parking in the area is horrendous. Devon only has meter parking; the surrounding side streets have permit parking, inaccessible to business patrons at most hours.

Aruna Singh said she drove around for 20 minutes Wednesday night looking for a spot.

“It’s awful,” she said.

The construction plan was submitted to city zoning officials in 2004 by Asat Inc. with a timeline of 18 months, start to finish.

Construction commenced in June 2007 and, nearly four years later, a visitor to the property can see that it is far from complete.

One reason for the delay is legal issues.

The city requires that buildings on Rockwell sit 20 feet back from the property line and be no more than two stories high. The Devon parking structure violates both of these restrictions.

A group of local homeowners brought a lawsuit against Asat and its president, Mohamed Siddiqui, which stopped construction for at least two months.

“It was kind of stunning that the zoning ordinances were altered so much to allow for this six-story building,” Mr. Freely said. “It was kind of a joke.”

Asat won the case and a subsequent appeal. No one from the development company could be reached for comment.

Another complaint is the structure’s design.

“This building just doesn’t make sense,” said Greg Brewer, an architect and one of Stone’s opponents in the Feb. 22 aldermanic race.

“It is so poorly designed as to be almost non-functional,” he said.

The structure is built to accommodate commercial space on the first level, parking on the second, third and fourth levels, and 24 condo units on the fifth and sixth levels.

Brewer said the site was previously home to a parking lot that had about 60 spots. The new structure promises 159 total spots, 110 of which will be designated for public use.

With a net gain of about 50 spots, the $16 million project—almost $4 million from tax increment finance money—makes the cost of each new spot about $350,000.

“You can get more parking in cheaper ways,” Brewer said, such as creating an angled parking system on Devon or loosening up the parking permit limitations on surrounding streets.

“It’s like having a spaceship land in your backyard,” Sue Freely said.

The community had a gathering space before, she said, because street fairs, farmers markets and dances were held at the open-air parking lot.

“This is worse than the Berlin Wall,” she said. “It has nothing to do with uniting people.”

Despite the opposition, local businesses and patrons are excited to have the garage open sooner than later.

Wajid Ahsan works at J.K. Kabab House directly across Rockwell from the structure. “We are hoping and praying that business will be better once it’s completed,” he said.

When Singh heard that Ald. Stone would have it open by Feb. 22, she gave two thumbs up.

“I will come back after that,” she said. “Not before.”
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Old January 21st, 2011, 08:35 PM   #189
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Mr Whites plan. Census data re Rogers Park.

http://www.chicagonewscoop.org/candi...ncing-is-used/

Candidates Question the Ways Tax Increment Financing Is Used
By MICK DUMKE
January 20, 2011

Brian White, candidate for the 49th Ward, proposes a different use for TIF.
Jose More/Chicago News Cooperative
Nearly 300 church members, community activists and other area residents gathered in the auditorium of a Rogers Park school last Sunday to celebrate the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. — and to rally around a proposal to create a special taxing district that would finance neighborhood rental housing exclusively.
Its chief proponent, Brian White, an advocate of affordable housing and a candidate for 49th Ward alderman, received rousing applause after he addressed the group.

Its chief opponent, the ward’s incumbent alderman, Joe Moore, was not at the event. “Simply put, I am shut out of the meeting,” he wrote in a statement distributed by supporters outside.

The political dustup in Rogers Park, which has roughly the same boundaries as the 49th Ward, is the latest example of how tax increment financing, or TIF, has become a leading issue in the Feb. 22 municipal elections. Candidates and voters are hungrily eyeing the hundreds of millions of tax dollars flowing annually into the city’s TIF program, an economic-development initiative financed and administered separately from the city’s $6 billion annual budget.

Tax increment financing works by siphoning off some property taxes in designated areas, known as TIF districts, and setting the money aside for corporate subsidies, infrastructure, job training, housing and anything else that city officials deem a catalyst for economic development. The increase in property values that results from development would mean more revenue for the city.

As the city struggles with annual deficits in its regular budget, the lack of transparency in how TIF money is used and the sheer quantity of resources it consumes has inspired calls for reform. About $500 million has gone into the TIF program in each of the last four years, and most financing decisions are made behind closed doors by top city officials and aldermen.

Leading mayoral candidates have taken notice. Rahm Emanuel, President Obama’s former chief of staff, has said he would include TIF finances in the regular budget that the City Council must approve publicly. He has also proposed using TIF dollars to pay for more police officers. Carol Moseley Braun, the former United States senator, has called for a moratorium on TIFs so that the money could be used to shore up the regular city budget, while another candidate, Gery Chico, said he wanted more TIF subsidies for small businesses. Miguel del Valle has said that the TIF program should be restructured to ensure that money is flowing into “blighted” communities, the program’s original intent, rather than prosperous neighborhoods downtown, which have received the vast majority of TIF dollars.

Meanwhile a coalition of incumbent aldermen and lower cost-housing advocates has been fighting for months to get the City Council to approve the Sweet Home Chicago ordinance, which would set aside 20 percent of all TIF funds citywide for affordable housing. It has been thwarted by council allies of Mayor Richard M. Daley, who believe that it limits the city’s ability to decide how best to use the TIF money.

The proposal in the 49th Ward is a new twist on tax increment financing. Housing advocates led by Mr. White, who is on leave as executive director of the Lakeside Community Development Corporation, want to create a TIF district with the sole purpose of generating funds to preserve rental housing. Referred to as a rental improvement fund district, or RIF, it would encompass most of the ward. Tax increment financing has traditionally been viewed as a means of reversing neighborhood decline, but Mr. White said his plan would help slow gentrification. Subsidies would be provided to landlords who agreed to keep rents low.

Rogers Park has long been one of the most diverse areas in Chicago, but Mr. White noted that recent census data showed it had lost about one-fifth* of its black and Hispanic residents since 2000.

“We could do something that fundamentally changes how we protect housing in Rogers Park,” he said.

Mr. White and other neighborhood activists said Mr. Moore was enthusiastic when they first approached him with the proposal in 2009 and that he had told them he would help them enact the plan. Marilyn Pagan-Banks, executive director of A Just Harvest, an antipoverty organization, said Mr. Moore told them the plan was “cutting edge.”

Mr. Moore said he had merely promised to keep an open mind. “I told them they needed to demonstrate broad-based community support,” he said. “They have failed miserably.”

The activists and the alderman butted heads over financing for an independent study to determine whether the ward qualified as a TIF district; Mr. White eventually secured grant money to pay for it. Mr. Moore said he wanted to create a task force to study the issue further; Mr. White said he saw this as a stalling tactic.

In October, Mr. White decided to challenge Mr. Moore’s re-election bid. He said the TIF proposal was just one of his ideas for bringing “balanced development” to the ward.

Mr. White said he received an angry call from Mr. Moore soon after he began collecting signatures to get on the ballot. “I told him, ‘The happiest thing for me would be to be working at Lakeside and supporting you on all the wonderful things you’re doing in the community, but you’re not,’” Mr. White said.

Mr. Moore maintained that Mr. White had always wanted his job. “I view this TIF proposal as part of a long-term strategic plan on his part to run for alderman — a flawed strategic plan,” he said.

The Illinois law governing tax increment financing is so broadly written that widely differing areas can qualify, from economically depressed communities to not-so-depressed parts of the Loop where the buildings are simply old.

The study commissioned by Mr. White, which was released last week, concluded that not all of the housing in the 49th Ward was troubled enough to qualify for a TIF district — though the areas that might be eligible could collect more than $55 million in TIF funds over the next 23 years.

At the rally Sunday, organized by Northside Power (People Organized to Work, Educate and Restore), Mr. White told the standing-room-only crowd that he viewed the preservation of rental housing as a civil rights issue. “The election is coming up in five weeks, and there are two candidates on the ballot,” he said. “There’s one candidate who’s going to push for the RIF, and there’s another who’s not standing with you today.” The room erupted with applause.

In the letter distributed by supporters, Mr. Moore wrote that the study had justified his decision not to endorse the TIF plan, but rally organizers “will not grant me the courtesy of allowing me to explain my position at their meeting.”

Mr. Moore wrote that by capturing property tax money to be used only for rental housing, the proposed TIF “would deprive our community of the flexibility to decide how millions of tax dollars could be spent in the future.”

The alderman noted that he was a supporter of other affordable-housing proposals, including Sweet Home Chicago, although its foes had argued that it, too, would limit flexibility in using property tax funds.

In a subsequent interview, Mr. Moore said the comparison was unfair, because the Sweet Home Chicago plan would leave 80 percent of all tax increment financing money available for uses besides housing.

He said the TIF program needed more transparency and oversight, especially in tight budget times. If the program did not exist, the taxes it collects would instead go to the regular city budget, the public schools and other local government agencies.

“It’s not free money,” he said.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 06:29 PM   #190
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Renovations plus new Loyola dorms

http://www.loyolaphoenix.com/2.541/n...nced-1.1917825

New housing plans announced
By Nathan Lurz


...To replace them, it has been proposed that two new first year halls be built in the parking lots directly east of Simpson Hall and south of Wright Hall. In turn, Regis Hall, which currently houses freshmen, will be opened to sophomores.

...Loyola is also planning on a new, building similar to the Morgan, a mixed-use residential and retail space in the currently empty lot on Loyola Avenue and a living space for upperclassmen, faculty and staff along Albion. Both would be "off-grid," meaning that residents would not be forced to enroll in a meal plan and would sign a full 12-month lease with prices competitive to local apartments.
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Old January 27th, 2011, 08:02 AM   #191
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy View Post
http://www.loyolaphoenix.com/2.541/n...nced-1.1917825

New housing plans announced
By Nathan Lurz


...To replace them, it has been proposed that two new first year halls be built in the parking lots directly east of Simpson Hall and south of Wright Hall. In turn, Regis Hall, which currently houses freshmen, will be opened to sophomores.

...Loyola is also planning on a new, building similar to the Morgan, a mixed-use residential and retail space in the currently empty lot on Loyola Avenue and a living space for upperclassmen, faculty and staff along Albion. Both would be "off-grid," meaning that residents would not be forced to enroll in a meal plan and would sign a full 12-month lease with prices competitive to local apartments.
^ The article is confusing. While they plan to build new dorms, they also plan to decommission some of them.

So will this be a net gain in residences/buildings or simply a churning of space? Will those old dorms simply be torn down, so that in the end we'll have the same number of vacant lots?

If so, that would be really disappointing..
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Old April 26th, 2011, 04:44 AM   #192
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Loyola buys empty Four plus One in RP. YESSSSSS.

http://www.chicagorealestatedaily.co...gh-end-housing


Loyola buys apartment complex for high-end housing
By: Frank Kalman April 22, 2011

(Crain’s) — Loyola University Chicago bought a two-building apartment complex just north of its Rogers Park campus and plans to convert the buildings into high-end student housing.

The Catholic university paid $6 million for the vacant complex of some 120 units at 6610-28 N. Sheridan Road, and plans to spend close to $10 million on renovations that will include new kitchens, in-unit laundry machines and new common areas, says Wayne Magdziarz, the school’s vice-president of capital planning.

The apartments will accommodate about 300 upperclassmen and are to be ready by fall 2012, part of a broader push by Loyola to upgrade and augment its main Rogers Park campus, Mr. Magdziarz says.

“We know our students look for apartment-style living,” he says. “So this will fill that gap for us.”

Loyola bought the 42-year-old complex earlier this month from PNC Bank, which early last year sued to foreclose on a pair of loans secured by that property and another one after the former owner, investor Ayman Khalil, failed to land financing to renovate the 6610-28 N. Sheridan Road complex.

Mr. Khalil bought the buildings in 2005 for $11.6 million, according to property records, and surrendered the complex to PNC last fall after the bank filed a $23-million foreclosure suit against the complex and a 105-unit apartment building at 7301 N. Sheridan Road. The loans came due in December 2009, according to PNC’s lawsuit.

Related story: Investor faces foreclosure on 2 apartment buildings

The 6610-28 N. Sheridan Road property was in the process of being renovated by Mr. Khalil, who in 2008 was in line to receive $2.8 million in tax-increment financing from the city. But Mr. Khalil failed to obtain private financing, and the TIF funding never materialized.

The location of the complex, a "four-plus-one" structure with four stories of apartments on top of a parking garage, was a good fit for Loyola.

“I don’t think you could ask for a better location in Rogers Park,” says Doug Fisher, a principal with Chicago-based Essex Realty Group Inc., who brokered the sale.

Loyola’s Mr. Madgiarz says it was an opportunity to invest in a property north of its campus, while in years past the school has largely focused on properties on its southern end, near the Granville CTA El stop.

The 15,300-student university in 2009 opened the first phase of its $400-million Loyola Station development, at Sheridan Road and Arthur Avenue, with an eight-story, 152-unit student apartment building called the Morgan at Loyola Station. Plans call for another residential tower there and about 90,000 square feet of retail space



Read more: http://www.chicagorealestatedaily.co...#ixzz1KaawksNT
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Old June 7th, 2011, 02:17 AM   #193
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http://luc.edu/farmersmarket/

New Farmers Market at Loyola Stop Red Line
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Old June 27th, 2011, 07:18 AM   #194
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Pride makes it up to Rogers Park this year

http://gaychicagonews.com/blog/2011/...rut-its-pride/

Rogers Park gears up to strut its Pride
by Matt Simonette on Jun 21, 2011

The Glenwood will be ground zero for Pride North

CHICAGO – On Sunday, June 26, once the Pride Parade ends, thousands of Mardi Gras beads will be swept off Lakeview streets. A few overheated flatbed trucks will be towed from Lincoln Park. And thousands of revelers will descend upon their favorite watering holes and dance clubs to continue the Pride fun.But this year, many of those revelers will be heading north of Devon Avenue to Rogers Park.

Pride North, a large-scale celebration on Glenwood Avenue between Lunt and Morse Avenues, begins at 4 p.m. and lasts until 10 p.m. The featured entertainment will be DJ Moosebox and DJ Voxbox, as well as 1980s cover band Sixteen Candles.“Many of our customers didn’t want to hang around in Lakeview and wait in line to get served in places they wouldn’t wait the other 364 days a year,” said Renee Labrana, co-owner of the Glenwood Bar, 6962 N. Glenwood Ave., and an organizer of Pride North.

Labrana and her co-owner, Colm Treacy, had originally planned a pre-Pride gathering and a group who’d go down and watch the parade together.“But it just kept getting bigger and bigger,” Labrana said. “Finally we just said, ‘Why not throw a party here?’”Rogers Park has long been regarded as one of the city’s most economically and ethnically diverse neighborhoods. It is home to a sizeable LGBT community as well as gay-owned and -operated businesses such as Touché, Jackhammer and the Leather Archives.

But for many years there was a lingering sense among some locals that, to do something “gay,” you had to hop on the El or the bus and ride to Lakeview or Andersonville, according to Labrana. When she and Treacy opened their doors in 2008, “We couldn’t believe how many people seemed to be waiting for us,” she said.Kimberly Bares, executive director of the Rogers Park Business Alliance, remembers being surprised by the number of gay people in the neighborhood when she and her partner were house hunting in Rogers Park.

“Whenever we went to an open house, it would belong to a gay couple,” Bares said. “The real estate agent would usually stand on the front porch, point at each house and tell us if the owners were gay or not.” Labrana added, “Gay people may have lived in the same building or lived on the same street, but many of them didn’t know that anyone else was there.” Her bar has become a “sort of public meeting house. It’s like this extended family that we helped create.”

The Glenwood Bar is part of a revitalized nightlife within the area known as the Glenwood Area Arts District, which includes more recent additions such as the Mayne Stage entertainment complex, 1328 W. Morse Ave., and long-established businesses such as the Heartland Café, 7000 N. Glenwood Ave.

Ald. Joe Moore (49th) said he is “thrilled” with a lot of changes in the neighborhood, which include significant improvements to the Morse Avenue streetscape that were marked by a ribbon-cutting ceremony in early June.“A lot of great changes have taken place up here,” added Moore. “Not only do you have a lot of these businesses, but we have a farmers’ market that is bringing a lot of people up here on Sundays.”

The popular Glenwood Sunday Market has met with tremendous response from locals, according to Bares, and is among the myriad reasons the gay population has continued to grow in the neighborhood. “Rogers Park has unfettered access to the lake and an abundance of mass transit options,” Bares said. “It’s someplace offering the best value for their dollars, and there’s that long tradition of being welcome to all kinds of different families.”

Labrana said the community’s enthusiasm is what makes the Pride party a possibility.“With the community behind me and the alderman behind me, I knew that this was going to happen,” she said. Moore said he’s going to be there June 26.“The GLBT community has just provided so much energy and excitement to Rogers Park,” he added. “It’s really filled with a lot of great people.”

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Old July 6th, 2011, 06:07 PM   #195
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Urban Farm 7501 N ashland?

http://www.suntimes.com/business/roe...rban-farm.html

Rogers Park harvests plan for open land that could become urban farm
DAVID ROEDER [email protected] July 5, 2011 7:42PM

Updated: July 6, 2011 2:10AM

Densely and diversely populated, could Rogers Park on the city’s North Side soon be the site of an urban farm?

It’s an idea getting a serious push, and deservedly so. Capital to build on vacant lots is hard to come by, so why not use the land to grow produce and teach agricultural and business skills?

Rogers Park could get a farm at 7501 N. Ashland, a two-acre site that 20 years ago was the home of Lerner Newspapers. Royal Bank of Canada is foreclosing on the land. The city invited developer proposals for the property a few years ago, but nobody responded.

Residents organized as Rogers Park Farms have proposed taking it over, but they need funding and city help to get it out of private hands. Ald. Joe Moore, whose 49th Ward covers Rogers Park, has authored an ordinance authorizing the city to negotiate to buy the property.

Moore said he’s intrigued by the farming idea but wants to leave the door open to other development interests. He said money is available from the account of a tax-increment financing district that includes the property. Called the Howard Paulina district, it last reported a balance in 2010 of $11.2 million.

Any farmers interested in taking over the property “would have to demonstrate they have the capacity to carry this off,” Moore said. His ordinance is up for a vote today at the City Council.

Moore said Rogers Park Farms wants to partner with the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights, which is establishing a farm on the West Side.

“It could work well in my neck of the woods, too, with the high unemployment we have near Howard Street,” Moore said.
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Old July 16th, 2011, 01:11 AM   #196
spyguy
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New Loyola developments around Wright Hall



Rendering of the Loyola CTA station renovation
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Old July 16th, 2011, 09:32 PM   #197
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looks good spyguy!
Fits in with the whole patio concept at the 400/starbucks/chipotle/etc on sheridan and even at pratt and sheridan.

I really think that Sheridan/ that part is going to take off as a great place for a stroll, for eating/shopping etc.


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Old December 23rd, 2011, 10:59 AM   #198
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammed wong View Post
http://www.chicagorealestatedaily.co...gh-end-housing


Loyola buys apartment complex for high-end housing
By: Frank Kalman April 22, 2011

(Crain’s) — Loyola University Chicago bought a two-building apartment complex just north of its Rogers Park campus and plans to convert the buildings into high-end student housing.


Read more: http://www.chicagorealestatedaily.co...#ixzz1KaawksNT
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This is huge because that building was shit. Anyhow, now if Loyola could do this a few more times north.of campuss.....How abut turning the old hotel at Pratt and Sherdian into a boutique hotel for visiting parents etc....just a thought.
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Old December 24th, 2011, 12:43 AM   #199
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Originally Posted by lawfin View Post
This is huge because that building was shit. Anyhow, now if Loyola could do this a few more times north.of campuss.....How abut turning the old hotel at Pratt and Sherdian into a boutique hotel for visiting parents etc....just a thought.
True....
Loyola has a new little boutique hotel just west of the CVS on Loyola.
Loyola and Pritzker are the too biggest real estate players in Rogers Park, atleast that I know of in my area.

I would like to see that gigantic building get a nice makeover.
I know there is a new restaurant where Ropa used to be, forgot the name but it looks like its a sports bar. That and there is a new restaurant called Pillars Social Club at Pratt and Sheridan across the street that is about to open. I dont post much on here anymore, mainly I stick to everyblock Rogers Park.
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Old February 8th, 2012, 09:28 PM   #200
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More Development Planned for Morse

A five story mixed use development planned next to the One Acthttp://zfengarchitect.com/residentia...cts/morse.html

Apparently a new bistro is going in on the corner of Glenwood and Morse as well. Lot of energy and life coming to that area around the train station.
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