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Old January 31st, 2007, 07:22 AM   #61
wickedestcity
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I bumped into a friend today who I remember was petitioning to get Devon fixed up and he told me that it was passed and that its a done deal . They need to wait till the end of the next tax period or something before they can start but basically there going to clean up the Ave. nicely. Its divided into 3 sections to be (if I remember correctly) Kedzie to California, California to western, and western to Ridge. Each section will be fixed up with newly paved sidewalks, nice flower pot/beds , street lamps, street lamp decorations /lighting schemes and other upgrades to the Ave. similar to what has been done in other areas of the city etc.
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Old January 31st, 2007, 07:44 AM   #62
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^ Good news! It's about time, if you ask me..
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Old January 31st, 2007, 12:47 PM   #63
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Does this mean that Devon will actually be attractive????
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Old February 1st, 2007, 12:33 AM   #64
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Hope so
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Old February 22nd, 2007, 01:05 AM   #65
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Loyola Bubble? Local Artwork at EL stations

Excerpt From Loyola Phoenix


CTA works to bring community and Loyola art to local el stations
Maria Randazzo
Issue date: 2/21/07 Section: News
PrintEmail Article Tools Page 1 of 3 next > They call themselves the CTA. No, it's not the Chicago Transit Authority's train conductors or drivers of the 147 bus. This CTA is a group of Loyola students seeking to create a strong visual connection between the university and Rogers Park.

The acronym is no coincidence. Community Transforming Art (CTA) hopes to establish a bond by mounting artwork from the Loyola and Rogers Park communities onto the Loyola el stop.

......

Five student teams chose which activist groups to collaborate with based on presentations from each organization. Before pitching their idea to the class, the girls ventured into Rogers Park to diffuse their ideas and receive feedback from community leaders, city officials and citizens. They attended Rogers Park art exhibits and aldermanic forums and are currently networking with local artists through the Rogers Park Web site.

.....

Although they are still in a developmental phase, CTA's project will reach its final stage when a proposal is approved by Adopt-A-Station, a program of the Chicago Transit Authority. Since October of 2005, 20 el stations have been "adopted" and aesthetically renovated, including the Sheridan, Morse and Davis stops.
"Our goal is to bring people together and integrate Loyola with the Rogers Park community," McManus said. "We have a lot of Loyola pride and many artistic students."

CTA plans to allot space on the train station to different organizations from Rogers Park and from Loyola. These groups would be asked to design their area as a reflection of themselves. Ideally, CTA would coordinate one day in the spring where residents and students could create their pieces together.

"Having the el stop as a testament to the diversity of Loyola and the diversity of the neighborhood would be amazing," McManus said.

.........

Many students believe in the "Loyola bubble," the theory that the university is ignorant of the Rogers Park community and that it does not branch outside of campus life. CTA begs to differ.
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Old March 15th, 2007, 09:43 PM   #66
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Loyola Station

http://www.globest.com/news/863_863/...1.html?type=pf

Construction to Begin on $400M Loyola Station
By Gina Kenny

CHICAGO- McCaffery Interests Inc., based here, expects to break ground this spring on the first phase of Loyola Station, while work on a second phase will likely begin next year. The project is adjacent to Loyola University, in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood. The $400 million development will be built on 5.4 acres and is expected to have up to 60,000 sf of retail, 400 residences and 600 parking spaces. The area is part of a tax increment financing district.

The land is now used for surface parking, says Jennifer Clark, Loyola University’s director of community relations. A focus group conducted with students found that they were leaving the area for all of their shopping and entertainment. Clark says the goal is for Loyola Station to bring retail and other uses to the site that will be beneficial to both the students and the surrounding community. “I believe that this project is really going to jumpstart commercial development along Sheridan Road and Devon Avenue,” Clark says.

McCaffery was chosen as the developer for the first phase about 16 months ago, Clark says. One building will be eight stories with 152 luxury residential rentals with retail on the ground floor. The second building will be three stories with retail on the ground level and 205 parking spaces above. Representatives from McCaffery were unavailable for comment.

There will be a total of 33,000 sf of retail for both of the phase one buildings. The buildings are expected to open in the fall of 2008. “We do not have any retail leases signed yet but it is desperately needed by both the university and the community,” Clark says. There has been a lot of community interest in a restaurant, bookstore and “general retail” such as an ice cream shop.

A 75-year ground lease was signed with McCaffery for the first phase of the project, and the university will negotiate a long-term lease with the developer of the second phase of the project as well, Clark says. The university does not have a need for the land now but, by retaining ownership of the property, the land can be used for the expansion of the campus at a later date, if needed.

The deadline for proposals for the second phase of the project is April 27, says Peter Tortorello, vice president and project manager with Newcastle Limited, the broker for the project. There are two separate parcels that total 3.26 acres. One parcel is 77,567 sf and is bounded by Albion Avenue, Sheridan Road and the Chicago Transit Authority Red Line. The train stop near the parcel is the third busiest stop for the Chicago Transit Authority with 130,000 riders per month, he says. The second 64,259 parcel on West Loyola Avenue currently has a student residence and an apartment building on it. Tortorello says he expects proposals will be for a mixed-use development with retail on the ground level and residential rental units above. A developer will be chosen for the second phase of the project by late summer or early fall, with construction to possibly begin in 2008, says Tortorello.
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Old March 16th, 2007, 02:49 AM   #67
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^ Great news. I was just saying yesterday I remember how the relationship between the student body and Rogers Park was and has been pretty much non-existent. This is a hefty investment that think will pay off in the long run. I do think retailers will be a bit unsure in the beginning, although I love to be wrong on these occasions. Its time Loyola take the lead and start to spur some development around campus. I have big dreams for Broadway/Sheridan & Devon.

Btw, have renderings been released? $400 million is a big investment. I wanna see how the damn thing will look.
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Old March 16th, 2007, 06:07 PM   #68
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More info:
http://luc.edu/tif/project_stages.shtml
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Old March 16th, 2007, 06:11 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChgoLvr83 View Post
^ Great news. I was just saying yesterday I remember how the relationship between the student body and Rogers Park was and has been pretty much non-existent. This is a hefty investment that think will pay off in the long run. I do think retailers will be a bit unsure in the beginning, although I love to be wrong on these occasions. Its time Loyola take the lead and start to spur some development around campus. I have big dreams for Broadway/Sheridan & Devon.

Btw, have renderings been released? $400 million is a big investment. I wanna see how the damn thing will look.
You would think so, but the some people in RP are ungrateful to Loyola. I understand they want to keep the neighborhood diverse, but there needs to a halfway point. My family imigrated to RP in the 60's and it was a great place. It did have a decline and partially thanks to Loyola it's on it way back to the way it used to be. Check out this article in the Loyola Phoenix about Loyola and the neigborhood's relations.

http://www.loyolaphoenix.com/home/in...e-85d26ee3ecbf


TIF strains Loyola-RoPo relations
Phoenix News Special Series
Derek Quizon
Posted: 2/28/07
Loyola is a school that prides itself on being an active, positive force in the local community. With Loyola's ambitious plans for expansion and renovation, however, the university's administration has butted heads with community groups and activists over funding and the location of its new development projects.

Although these projects, which include a new Information Commons and numerous renovations, could mean great benefits for the student body, it has put incredible strain on relations between the university and the Rogers Park neighborhood that surrounds the Lake Shore campus. With the aldermanic candidates and community activists all acknowledging the tension that exists between the university and Rogers Park, the Phoenix took an opportunity to examine the state of affairs between Loyola and the neighboring community.

Although the interviewed candidates, offices and organizations all differed in opinion on the topic, they seemed to agree that the relationship between the school and the community is somewhat strained. Loyola alumnus and aldermanic candidate Don Gordon said the tension between the two is "very real" and blamed the alderman's office for not working with the administration closely enough to soften the blow of its new developments.

Jennifer Clark, director of Community Relations at Loyola, claims that the candidates' issues with Loyola are mainly election-year hype and accused them of being previously uninvolved in Loyola's affairs.

"I do not believe there to be any great tension between Rogers Park and Loyola," Clark said. "I think the reason for the statements … at the debates is simply campaign politics. It is an easy tactic to attempt to win voters by scapegoating an institution as large as Loyola."

Gordon, however, begged to differ, saying that the tension has only gotten worse with the university's new renovation projects. "Loyola is getting crucified on the TIF," Gordon said at the aldermanic debate a few weeks back. "Part of the problem is the alderman didn't lead that process correctly, and that's why they're getting crucified."

TIF stands for "tax increment financing," a measure that directs income from property taxes in a certain district toward renovation projects in the neighborhood. It is intended to help develop economically depressed areas, and although TIFs have been somewhat successful in the renovation of many different areas of the city, they are also controversial because they take money that would normally go to other public programs, such as schools, parks, roads and libraries.

The TIF Gordon was referring to was $46 million in financing the school received from the city last October for renovations of the Lake Shore campus. The university had planned to use $20 million to renovate Mundelein Center but expanded funding to more than double the original amount in order to pay for renovations of Coffey, Piper and Flanner Halls.

The idea behind a TIF is to use tax dollars to renovate and build up a particular district economically, increasing revenue from property taxes, which in turn goes back to the community. The biggest problem many local organizations have with the project is that Loyola is a non-profit institution, which makes property on its campus tax-exempt. This means that none of the public funding that goes into development projects is cycled back into the neighborhood.

One of the harshest critics of Loyola's development plans is blogger and local activist Craig Gernhardt. Gernhardt, who writes the "Broken Heart of Rogers Park" blog, has been an outspoken opponent of the Loyola TIF, as well as the marina project.

"Loyola is a not-for-profit university, and [it's] being funded … with TIF money, which is property owners in the neighborhood's money," Gernhardt said. Gernhardt's frustration is shared by many community organizations, including the Rogers Park Community Action Nework (RPCAN), which has been against the measure since the beginning, and North side POWER (People Organized to Work, Educate and Restore).

"Public funds are being used to enhance a private wealthy, institution," Dan Romero of Northside POWER said, "and so that is very controversial in the neighborhood, and you'll find a lot of folks who are really upset over that."

Many are also upset with what they perceive to be dishonesty in Loyola's planning and development process. Gernhardt in particular accused Loyola of pandering to local politicians in order to accomplish their development goals. He said that the TIF was first presented to the community in 2003 as the "Devon-Sheridan TIF," implying that the money would go to local property owners.

The university's administration claims that the building renovations help the community as a whole by providing a meeting space and contributing aesthetically to the neighborhood. Wayne Magdziarz, the university's vice president of capital planning, said there was a "tentative program" to dedicate an entire floor of the renovated Mundelein Center to non-profit community use.

Loyola alumnus and community activist Hugh Devlin, however, told the Phoenix last year that he felt the project was largely self-serving and would not give enough back to the community it was taking from.

"I believe that the benefits of the community [in this situation] are disproportional," Devlin said. "Give me the $45 million, and I will set up offices for non-profits, and I'll put some paint on the el stop."

The TIF is by far the biggest concern of local residents but not the only one. The university seems to have gained a reputation as the neighborhood bully, a developer that gets what it wants, when it wants, by lobbying local politicians and deceiving the public.

"At this point," Devlin wrote bitterly in his "North of Howard Watchers" blog, "if someone from Loyola told me 'God loves you' I would check it out."

Although the university has a reputation of getting whatever it wants in the neighborhood, the community did win a decisive victory in October of 2005 by preventing the construction of a proposed Loyola marina in Lake Michigan. A crowd of 300 concerned citizens, which was overwhelmingly opposed to the new project, showed up to a meeting at the Loyola Park Fieldhouse voicing the citizens' concern over the development of the shoreline, which activists hoped to preserve. It was finally decided by Park District representative Robert Rejman that the city would not follow through with the proposal.

The university was forced to battle a local advocacy group yet again with the new Information Commons. Although the new facility will be privately funded, it is being built on what was formerly the Jesuit Residence Lawn, a space that many local students, alumni and local residents cherished. The Rogers Park Conservancy, a group headed by aldermanic candidate Gordon, claimed that the building "blocks the last remaining vista of the lake and creates a canyon effect along the shoreline" and that Loyola was in violation of the Lakefront Protection Ordinance, which states its purpose is, "to promote and provide for the pedestrian access to the lake … and to protect and enhance vistas at these locations and wherever else possible."

The university responded by saying that these things would be provided for by the sidewalks and terrace included in the project. Clark added that the library would be a great community asset by providing local organizations with a meeting place and that a plan was in the works to allow non-student neighborhood residents to access the library and check out books.

After a major battle over the new TIF plan, as well as a couple of skirmishes over development plans, the university and the community at large are at a crossroads in their relationship. Despite protests from the neighborhood, Loyola is going through with two of the three projects planned for the community. The question is: How can the university ease the tension and remaining hostility over its newest development plans?

Gernhardt said the administration needs to do a better job of reaching out to the rest of the community when it plans new projects. "Loyola is a wonderful and great asset to our community," Gernhardt said. "It's unfortunate that they don't want to work more with the neighbors and the surrounding community. They instead go to the local politicians and begin lobbying to get what they want."

Clark agreed that communication was key. "My plan to ease the tension is pretty simple," Clark said. "I will continue to be a loud and active voice for students in the community and voice for the community on the campus. I will listen to people's concerns each and every time they contact me … I didn't come to Loyola to work in an ivory tower; I came to Loyola to demolish the ivory tower and create a campus community like no other."

Listening to the concerns of residents in the local community is the first step in achieving this goal, but judging by the fierce opposition met by Loyola's new development plans, the university has a long way to go before it can truly become the campus community it wants to be.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
© Copyright 2007 The Phoenix
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Old March 16th, 2007, 10:18 PM   #70
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Thank you. I like it. Its nothing earth-shattering but it really doesnt have to be. It addresses the street well and the design is pretty good. I have to say its design is better than anything that exists now though. I fully support this project. I live in Rogers Park and I really do hope for more private developments like this away from the university esp. along Howard St.
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Old March 17th, 2007, 06:51 AM   #71
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^ It's better than parking lots but it's so....Washington DC!!

(Or at least that was the kind of crap being built everywhere in DC when I lived there)
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Old April 23rd, 2007, 09:32 PM   #72
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Howard Street

What is going on at Howard Street? I know the one big crane is for apartments being built. I saw this weekend several other smaller ones. Does anybody know what is happening with those (is this part of the city's Howard Stop renovation?)
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Old July 17th, 2007, 05:46 PM   #73
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and you guys call this neighborhood suburban? check out the newst development comming to my neck of the woods:

http://sacramentosquare.com/



two rows of homes squeeezed between sacramento and the alley
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Old July 18th, 2007, 12:22 AM   #74
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Not that bad.... it's ridiculously dense for a townhome development.

Auto oriented? Not really, although I'm disappointed with the site planning. If those townhouses are like most new construction, the back walls will be faced with ugly vinyl siding, and slapdash windows. The people living in the second row will have absolutely no good views - they will see the ugly backs of other peoples' houses from every window.
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Old July 20th, 2007, 06:26 AM   #75
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^ It's ugly though and still looks like something you'll find in south elgin.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:26 AM   #76
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New Howard Street Development

Lookee what I found on the North of Howard Blog

For pictures click on the link
http://www.rogers-park.com/2007/07/exciting-things.html

on 1531 w Howard, a nice 5 story building that is mixed use has just been annouced.,
what is ofcourse refreshing about this part of Rogers Park is that
you wont hear too much from nimbies, looks like some lowrise brickers
will be demo'd to allow this to be built, nice looking building check it out.

(Exciting things are happening on Howard Street
The Howard Street Special Service Area has put up the first of many signs announcing the exciting things happening on Howard Street. Construction will begin soon at 1531 W. Howard Street. This beautiful mixed use building will be developed by Sherlock Homes Builders and sold by Camelot Realty)

For more information on developments on Howard Street, contact Courtney Owen at (773) 508-5885 or [email protected].


Looks like this is on the south side of howard just west of the amazing howard/rogers/greenview intersection,
among the most confusing and dangerous and cool intersections in chicago.
it is just also just west of the awesome/interesting lost eras antique shop.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:32 AM   #77
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gale park field house

also check this out
http://howardwatchers.blogspot.com/s...0Field%20House

also the high rise on howard by clark is looking good as far as progress is concerned and the condo conversion on the corner across the street is looking good,

Finally some action on this long neglected street.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 06:14 PM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammed wong View Post
also check this out
http://howardwatchers.blogspot.com/s...0Field%20House

also the high rise on howard by clark is looking good as far as progress is concerned and the condo conversion on the corner across the street is looking good,

Finally some action on this long neglected street.
^ Highrise on Howard by Clark.....What development is this?
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Old August 2nd, 2007, 01:39 AM   #79
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http://www.rogers-park.com/

also check out the above link to see a rendering
of the new morse theatre which is in the process of being rehabbed at wayne and morse.



URB i guess it must be technically in evanston,
but this seems wrong to me, but hey
city limits is a very very tricky thing,
i guess west of the el the north side of howard is evanston,
this building is listed under evanston developments
check out the first page
its the 413-421 e howard building which will be 17 stories,
which in my book is a highrise, and its looking good so far.

when you drive down the street from the east side of howard to the west it sure as hell looks like its in chicago,
eh who cares, but it helps out the whole area.

to use a
wording used very often (clique)
mystery solved.
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Old August 9th, 2007, 06:13 AM   #80
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Opening up the beach in Rogers Park?

North Siders drawing lines in the sand over Lake Michigan plan

A fence extends into Lake Michigan at Sherwin Avenue, separating the public space from a private beach next door. / Photo by Elisabeth Kwak-Hefferan
By ELISABETH KWAK-HEFFERAN
Medill News Service
published:Aug 06, 10:25 AM

Whose lakefront is it, anyway?

An advocacy group looking to open the city's entire 30-mile shoreline to the public may confront a storm of controversy when it asks that question this fall in Rogers Park and Edgewater. Only four miles of Chicago's lakefront remain inaccessible-two of them in those North Side communities.

A group of architects working pro bono for Friends of the Parks has turned its attention to the remaining chunks of inaccessible land-roughly from the city's northern boundary to Loyola Park, then from Loyola Park south to Hollywood Avenue.

The planners completed a proposal for the South Side's lakefront last month. Next up is a plan for the North Side, starting with public meetings in September.

Private condos loom over the lake on much of that land-and some owners aren't happy about the prospect of losing their space.

"When I bought my unit, it was in a certain place and the lake was in a certain place," said Richard Strauss, who lives in the Malibu East building at 6033 N. Sheridan Rd. "If you're going to change that, you're impinging on my rights."

Strauss, 69, said the neighborhood has plenty of public lakefront access elsewhere and that an expensive project to expand the beach would be a waste of money. Plus, "I have great concern about noise and traffic," he said.

Strauss, who is first vice president of the condo association's board of directors, stressed he was speaking personally and not as a representative for the board.

William Budinski, 50, a real estate agent who lives in a lakefront condo on Sherwin Avenue in Rogers Park, said he feared the plan would bring garbage and bustle to his private beach. "It would no longer be a peaceful dead-end street," he said. "I hope that never happens. I would probably move."

Friends of the Parks' plan to expand public access also ran into outspoken opposition on the South Side from private lakefront homeowners between 71st and 75th streets. The group does not expect to finish its proposal for the entire lakefront until 2009.

Despite the strong feelings of some condo owners, others applaud the idea of more beaches, parks and paths.

"With the density increasing on the North Side, it would make more sense to have as much beach access as possible," said Chris Ryan, 48, as he walked his dog at Berger Park on Granville Avenue.

Ryan, whose Rogers Park condo blocks public access to the lake with rocks, said he'd have no problem with opening the front of his building to Chicago's beachgoers.

"I can't believe that somebody would buy a condo just to have a private beach," he said.

Rashni Patel, 21, a Loyola University student, said a fully public shore would give her workouts a boost by extending lakeside running paths. "I'd rather just do that than going in circles," she said, adding that now she's forced to run on the sidewalk at Thorndale Avenue, where condos act as a barrier to the lakefront.

Alderman Joe Moore (49th) said he'll wait to see a final proposal before weighing in on the plan to open the last lakefront miles in his ward. "It depends on what you mean by 'opening up to the public,'" he said. "The devil is, as always, in the details."

A spokesman for Alderman Mary Anne Smith (48th) was more enthusiastic. "It's great," said Tom Samuels. "More green, more access, mom and apple pie. You can't go wrong."

Friends of the Parks will test that theory as it gathers public input this fall. "The first and foremost thing we want to do is see what the community needs," said Joanne Bauer, president of an architecture firm and one of the architects working on the lakefront plan.

They may need to brace for some discord. Open space lovers will likely be joined by condo owners like Strauss. "I will do anything I can do to bring thousands of people to their meeting," he said, "and tell them that they're full of it."
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