daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments > DN Archives



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 6th, 2009, 04:31 AM   #121
homemania
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 20
Likes (Received): 0

$15.5 billion in downtown spending?
4/1/2009 10:00:00 PM
----------------------------
from: http://chicagojournal.com/Main.asp?S...ArticleID=7291


Plan imagines a burst of transportation projects through 2020

By MICAH MAIDENBERG
Editor

A draft city plan envisions $15.5 billion in spending through 2020 on a range of transportation, infrastructure and open space projects in the neighborhoods in and around the Loop.

The Chicago Central Area Action Plan, which needs approval by the Plan Commission and city council, focuses on transportation, offering a detailed list of projects that would remake how residents and visitors would move through the Loop and its nearby environs.

The plan is not a binding document, but does set out specific priorities for Near Loop neighborhoods. A previous plan guiding downtown development passed in 2003.


A rendering of the West Loop transportation hub near Clinton Street, a project imagined in the city's new draft downtown plan.
City of Chicago

Potential projects include spending $500 million to cap the Kennedy Expressway between Monroe and Washington streets, creating green space; spending $2 billion for a West Loop Transportation Center, described as a "four-level intermodal transfer center" beneath Clinton Street; and using $3 billion for a new north-south subway line connecting the Chinatown and North/Clybourn stops on the Red Line with the new West Loop transit hub.

Other projects imagined include the modernization of nine CTA stations, construction of four new CTA stations and new bridges over Taylor, Polk and 16th streets.

The Plan Commission was set to vote on the document in March, but Ald. Bob Fioretti (2nd) said he and Reilly asked for the item to be deferred until more public input could be gathered. At least one community meeting, sponsored by Ald. Brendan Reilly (42nd), was held March 16 at the Cultural Center, and Friends of Downtown held a lunch session about the draft this March.

Dennis McClendon, a South Loop resident who tracks urban planning issues, said he hadn't seen the plan. McClendon is listed on the acknowledgments page in the draft. He said he had been to a couple of meetings in 2007.

"I think there should have been public discussion. The neighborhood groups were really closed out in the original Central Area Plan," he said, referring to the 2003 document. In that case, McClendon said, "the city really feared what would happen if they allowed neighborhood groups to come in and squabble instead of having a nice comfortable meeting with the downtown development community."

Enrique Perez, a Printers Row resident who also watches development closely, criticized the city for not publicizing the work they were doing on the plan sooner. "According to the document ... this has been in the works for 18 months, which is fine for a plan of this scope. But why wasn't this process rolled out to the public 18 months ago? At least, 'Hey, we're working on it.'

"What I see is there is a seeming lack of transparency," Perez went on to say.

Karen Bates, with the Dept. of Zoning and Land Use Planning, wrote in an e-mail that the city has worked closely with civic and business groups, city agencies and residents on both the '03 plan and the latest draft. She named the Streeterville Organization of Active Residents and city-funded delegate agencies like the Near South Planning Board and the West Loop Community Organization as examples of groups involved. Outreach efforts included various steering committees and a task force, Bates wrote.

The projects, according to the document, will be paid for by a mixture of local taxpayer dollars, money from the state and federal governments as well as "public-private" partnerships.

The city's share of the spending is estimated to be $6 billion to $8 billion, an average of $500 million to $667 million annually between now and 2020, raised through tax increment financing and general obligation bonds backed by property tax revenue. The document notes the "sum of total budgets for the Central Area TIF districts over their 23-year life span is $3.2 billion."

TIF districts freeze property taxes within specific boundaries, diverting any new property taxes back into projects within the district instead of to taxing bodies like the Board of Education or park district. In 2007, more than $555 million was collected in the city's TIF districts, according to Cook County Clerk David Orr.

Fioretti called the draft "pie in the sky," with vague funding mechanisms.

"Do we have enough money generated by TIF funding? The answer is no. What is realistic over the next 10 years, and what's not? There's no explanation of federal funding," Fioretti said.

Fioretti said the plan earmarked too much money for downtown projects and for transportation infrastructure, and not enough for parks and schools.

Some of the projects listed in the draft were discussed throughout last year, such as new CTA station at Morgan Street serving the Green and Pink lines and the Congress Parkway Streetscape.

The plan covers neighborhoods bound by North Avenue, Interstate 55, Lake Michigan and Halsted Street, as well one area that juts further west, to Ashland, between Lake and the Eisenhower Expressway.

Sub-districts in the plan include the South Loop, West Loop, Near South Side, Near West Side, Chinatown and other areas that cover other neighborhoods in and around the Loop.

The Fulton River District Association is scheduled to host a meeting about the plan on April 2, and Fioretti said he's organizing one for later this month.

There's room to be skeptical of the plan, regardless of the final language in the document, some observers said.

"It seems that if we go to all the trouble to write a community plan that everyone agrees to, the Plan Commission pays not a bit of attention to it anyway," McClendon said.
homemania no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 6th, 2009, 08:12 AM   #122
simulcra
Cynical post-collegiate
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 937
Likes (Received): 1

This is really similar to an article posted in the sun-times? But something caught my eye here that wasn't in the sun-times:
Quote:
Potential projects include spending $500 million to cap the Kennedy Expressway between Monroe and Washington streets, creating green space; spending $2 billion for a West Loop Transportation Center, described as a "four-level intermodal transfer center" beneath Clinton Street; and using $3 billion for a new north-south subway line connecting the Chinatown and North/Clybourn stops on the Red Line with the new West Loop transit hub.
Is the first one what I think it is? There was a call for some design proposals or some such (maybe even in the central area plan) to cap off the free way, and is this the actual realization of such a plan??? That would be great! You'd get a vast stretch of parkland in primo urban territory.

And is the second a round-about way of saying "The Circle Line?" I guess I'm not too clear where the West Loop transit hub is, but a connection going from Chinatown to North/Clybourn by way of (what I assume would be) the Paulina Connector sounds a *lot* like the circle line's proposed rail routing.
__________________
Mmm... forbidden donut...
simulcra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 6th, 2009, 05:38 PM   #123
Flubnut
4th Level of Hades
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 709
Likes (Received): 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by simulcra View Post
You'd get a vast stretch of parkland in primo urban territory.
I read the actual plan, and while there would be green space, there would also be additional office towers as well. Best of both worlds, and probably easier to justify the expense.
Flubnut no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 7th, 2009, 07:34 AM   #124
ozzman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 30
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by simulcra View Post
This is really similar to an article posted in the sun-times? But something caught my eye here that wasn't in the sun-times:


Is the first one what I think it is? There was a call for some design proposals or some such (maybe even in the central area plan) to cap off the free way, and is this the actual realization of such a plan??? That would be great! You'd get a vast stretch of parkland in primo urban territory.

And is the second a round-about way of saying "The Circle Line?" I guess I'm not too clear where the West Loop transit hub is, but a connection going from Chinatown to North/Clybourn by way of (what I assume would be) the Paulina Connector sounds a *lot* like the circle line's proposed rail routing.
nope, not the circle line. it is mentioned in the pdf of the subway to be built under clinton from lake to roosevelt and then from there down to china town.
ozzman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 7th, 2009, 09:21 PM   #125
simulcra
Cynical post-collegiate
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 937
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by ozzman View Post
nope, not the circle line. it is mentioned in the pdf of the subway to be built under clinton from lake to roosevelt and then from there down to china town.
excuse my ignorance but.... what the hell is the point of that? so, it'd go from N/Clybourn down to Clinton street, where it would go under all the way down to Roosevelt over to Chinatown? It seems kind of redundant. It's not like the area is underserved by transit, and there's already going to be some connection for the express trains beween O'Hare and Midway, no? I mean, I guess it's useful for people arriving int he West Loop transit hub if their destination is not in the loop, but is it really worth that kind of cost?
__________________
Mmm... forbidden donut...
simulcra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 8th, 2009, 03:16 AM   #126
ozzman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 30
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by simulcra View Post
excuse my ignorance but.... what the hell is the point of that? so, it'd go from N/Clybourn down to Clinton street, where it would go under all the way down to Roosevelt over to Chinatown? It seems kind of redundant. It's not like the area is underserved by transit, and there's already going to be some connection for the express trains beween O'Hare and Midway, no? I mean, I guess it's useful for people arriving int he West Loop transit hub if their destination is not in the loop, but is it really worth that kind of cost?
I agree, that is a lot of coin for that new subway. The plan also specifically says that zoning will not be changed down Clinton from light industrial to commercial/residential. I live right at Clinton and Harrison and was hoping that the growing Roosevelt cooridor would spread north to me. Looks like I am out of luck on that one.
ozzman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2009, 08:49 AM   #127
homemania
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 20
Likes (Received): 0

Montessori school moving to West Loop

4/15/2009 10:00:00 PM

Montessori school moving to West Loop

http://www.chicagojournal.com/main.a...48&TM=6391.009

By MICAH MAIDENBERG
Contributing Reporter

An Oak Park-based private Montessori school is moving its elementary level classes from the bucolic suburb to the West Loop, with the expectation of enrolling its first classes in the city next fall.

Intercultural Montessori Language School teaches kids between the ages of 3 and 12, or preschool and sixth grade, using a dual-language program where half of the school day is taught in either Spanish, Japanese or Chinese Mandarin.

"If you have a child in this program and they're starting at three, they're getting the dual language," said Intercultural executive director Edina McGivern. "By the time they get in the elementary level, they're quite good at both languages."

The school will be located on the ground floor at 14 S. Racine. The school has signed a 15-year lease for the space, which will be built out to offer 14 classrooms. The school plans to use nearby Skinner Park for its recreation needs.

Next year, Intercultural hopes to enroll three preschool classes of 22 students each, and however many students who are currently studying in its elementary school in Oak Park follow the school to the West Loop.

The initial class of preschool students will then fill in the upper grades, with the school expanding as more students sign up. Ultimately, five of the 14 classrooms will be reserved for preschoolers, with the remainder serving elementary age students.

The school could attract students from any neighborhood in Chicago, but McGivern said the Intercultural chose the West Loop because of local demand for elementary level education.

"It was really the elementary program that acted as the impetus for us to move into where there was actually a demand for elementary education," she said. "When we did research, and talked with other Montessori schools, they seemed to have a waiting list. And there seems to be that demand in the West Loop."

The school's main preschool will stay in Oak Park.

The Montessori Academy of Chicago already operates in the West Loop, at 1335 W. Randolph.

Suder Montessori, a magnet public school, is open at 2022 W. Washington.

Contact: [email protected]
homemania no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2009, 08:50 AM   #128
homemania
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 20
Likes (Received): 0

Not sure if the school/education development in west loop is one pieces of the development news that should be posted here. But anyway, I just came across this article and thought it good for west loop community.
homemania no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2009, 04:26 PM   #129
DCT
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 72
Likes (Received): 6

I think this posting is very relevant. It's one thing to get people to move back into the city. It's another thing entirely to get them to stay. Improving or building new schools is one of the major missing pieces of urban redevelopment puzzle. I have a lot of friends who have left cities after having kids because the schools were so bad.
DCT no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2009, 11:15 PM   #130
simulcra
Cynical post-collegiate
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 937
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by DCT View Post
I think this posting is very relevant. It's one thing to get people to move back into the city. It's another thing entirely to get them to stay. Improving or building new schools is one of the major missing pieces of urban redevelopment puzzle. I have a lot of friends who have left cities after having kids because the schools were so bad.


Agreed. Judging from my own anecdotal evidence, along with affordability, the other reason for families to suburbanize is quality of schools. I know a lot of urbanites who really have no choice - they can't afford private schooling and a place in the city, so they go where the schools are good. Especially since the west loop is seeing a lot of redevelopment, it's good that educational infrastructure is kicking in, to help make the area more attractive for families.
__________________
Mmm... forbidden donut...
simulcra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2009, 03:07 AM   #131
homemania
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 20
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by simulcra View Post


Agreed. Judging from my own anecdotal evidence, along with affordability, the other reason for families to suburbanize is quality of schools. I know a lot of urbanites who really have no choice - they can't afford private schooling and a place in the city, so they go where the schools are good. Especially since the west loop is seeing a lot of redevelopment, it's good that educational infrastructure is kicking in, to help make the area more attractive for families.
True. I was happy to know the news as well.
homemania no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2009, 03:16 AM   #132
homemania
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 20
Likes (Received): 0

CENTRAL AREA ACTION PLAN PRESENTATION

West Loop Community Organization is holding a centeral area action plan presentation on May 11, 2009.

See http://www.westloop.org/news/contentview.asp?c=220535
homemania no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2009, 10:04 AM   #133
Jibba
Registered User
 
Jibba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 491
Likes (Received): 1

^Thanks for the heads-up. I'm supposed to be getting email alerts about upcoming Central Plan Meetings, but I haven't been notified of this one yet (I'm sure one will show up eventually...). I'll definitely come to this one more equipped than the last one for mostly South Loop people, especially considering WLCO is going to be there. Can't wait to give those jack-asses a piece of my mind. I encourage EVERYONE who can make it to show up and speak up; otherwise, the same idiotic people who always show up and always complain at these meetings will continue to try to turn Chicago into suburban, parking-glutted bliss.
Jibba no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 28th, 2009, 05:55 AM   #134
homemania
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 20
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibba View Post
^Thanks for the heads-up. I'm supposed to be getting email alerts about upcoming Central Plan Meetings, but I haven't been notified of this one yet (I'm sure one will show up eventually...). I'll definitely come to this one more equipped than the last one for mostly South Loop people, especially considering WLCO is going to be there. Can't wait to give those jack-asses a piece of my mind. I encourage EVERYONE who can make it to show up and speak up; otherwise, the same idiotic people who always show up and always complain at these meetings will continue to try to turn Chicago into suburban, parking-glutted bliss.
homemania no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 30th, 2009, 01:44 AM   #135
paytonc
Pragmatist
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: DC
Posts: 433
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by simulcra View Post
excuse my ignorance but.... what the hell is the point of that? so, it'd go from N/Clybourn down to Clinton street, where it would go under all the way down to Roosevelt over to Chinatown? It seems kind of redundant. It's not like the area is underserved by transit
This serves several markets:
- A western distribution route for north-south trains. Downtown has shifted west since the State Street subway was built, and for many people a Clinton subway would be closer to their jobs. There's also a bottleneck downtown for north-south trains: both the Loop and State Street subways are at/near capacity, but several of the branches have unused capacity. (Dan Ryan has new signals, the four-track North Side Main, the excess Congress ROW.)
- Distribution of passengers arriving at the commuter rail terminals, which currently don't have any rapid transit access. Similarly, it gets more transit passengers into the WLTC -- which, as noted above, is where the downtown busways will meet and where high-speed trains will circulate.
- Fostering additional new high-rise development in the riverside corridor from North Ave south to Cermak. This, more than anything else, would get Franklin Point and Riverside Park and Wolf Point and the rest of those vacant parcels finally built, and provide access to the Kingsbury Park area.

That's just off the top of my head, since I haven't read the plan. I think it's a far more worthy corridor than the Circle Line, especially #3 (which the Circle Line can't do).
__________________
http://westnorth.com
paytonc no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 30th, 2009, 03:58 AM   #136
simulcra
Cynical post-collegiate
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 937
Likes (Received): 1


thanks for the explanations

is there any east-west connector from the WLTC to the east end of the loop? I'm wondering if there's a potential for jeopardizing the competitiveness of the loop itself (since the west loop generally seems like it has better transit connectivity.
__________________
Mmm... forbidden donut...
simulcra no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 30th, 2009, 04:03 AM   #137
creil
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 343
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by paytonc View Post
This serves several markets:
- A western distribution route for north-south trains. Downtown has shifted west since the State Street subway was built, and for many people a Clinton subway would be closer to their jobs. There's also a bottleneck downtown for north-south trains: both the Loop and State Street subways are at/near capacity, but several of the branches have unused capacity. (Dan Ryan has new signals, the four-track North Side Main, the excess Congress ROW.)
- Distribution of passengers arriving at the commuter rail terminals, which currently don't have any rapid transit access. Similarly, it gets more transit passengers into the WLTC -- which, as noted above, is where the downtown busways will meet and where high-speed trains will circulate.
- Fostering additional new high-rise development in the riverside corridor from North Ave south to Cermak. This, more than anything else, would get Franklin Point and Riverside Park and Wolf Point and the rest of those vacant parcels finally built, and provide access to the Kingsbury Park area.

That's just off the top of my head, since I haven't read the plan. I think it's a far more worthy corridor than the Circle Line, especially #3 (which the Circle Line can't do).
Once again, to me it makes more sense to extend the Clinton Subway to McCormick Place either with an extended east/west subway line below Cermak or by using the elevated St Charles Air Line (my preference).

And if you're going to build this subway, then use the Western Ave plan for the Circle Line instead of Ashland.
__________________
I don't believe in the universe, I only believe in Chicago.
-Steely Dan
creil no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2009, 02:06 AM   #138
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,916
Likes (Received): 97

The Gateway - Halsted and Monroe - Taxman's Hyatt Extended Stay hotel
Chitown- Diamond JV along with Antunovich Associates has developed a quintessential mixed-use urban infill project adding additional life and excitement to a vibrant and growing neighborhood fabric. The Gateway is an exciting new development leading the way into Chicago's Greektown neighborhood. The redevelopment of an existing surface parking lot along legendary Halsted Street will offer retail tenants varying sized floor plates of flexible and contemporary space with ample covered parking on the "main street" of this electrifying near west side neighborhood.
This city block project consists of a 30-story 228 unit luxury residential tower rising from a landscaped pool deck, multiple parking levels and ground floor retail space. Adjacent to the residential tower parcel is the proposed hotel / retail block fronting on Halsted Street and wrapping the corners at Monroe and Green Streets. The retail block consists of multiple tenant spaces on the ground floor with a half city block space on the second floor suitable for a major grocery store or other large tenants. A 175 room five-story U-shaped hotel building sits amid a landscaped swimming pool terrace on top of the parking decks. The hotel building offers spectacular views of the loop skyline and is just around the corner from the lively Greektown entertainment district.



spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2009, 04:20 AM   #139
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,935
Likes (Received): 21

^ Sigh....

Damn this economic slowdown. This is a great project density-wise, if a bit lame architecturally
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2009, 08:57 AM   #140
simulcra
Cynical post-collegiate
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 937
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
^ Sigh....

Damn this economic slowdown. This is a great project density-wise, if a bit lame architecturally
right now, beggars can't be choosers. right? right?
__________________
Mmm... forbidden donut...
simulcra no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu