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Old June 20th, 2006, 08:50 PM   #21
spyguy
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http://www.chicagojournal.com/main.a...789&TM=74275.7

Wolcott lofts to fall
Demolition permit issued for Bucktown building

By KATHARINE GRAYSON, Staff Writer


Although the developer of the property at 1611-1627 N. Wolcott has apparently abandoned plans to seek a zoning change, the live/work lofts currently there are now expected to be torn down. According to the Web site for the city’s Building Department, the city issued a demolition permit for the building May 30; some neighbors had hoped the building could be saved.

Members of the Bucktown Community Organization had expressed interest in saving the building at a meeting held in January. At that time, the property’s new owner had requested that the neighborhood group support changing the zoning of the property from C1-2, a largely business class, to the residential designation of RT4.5, in order to build single-family homes.

In an interview two weeks ago, 32nd Ward Alderman Ted Matlak said he was aware that the developer, Ranquist Development, was no longer planning on seeking the zoning change. Matlak, could not be reached for comment before press time this week on the plans to demolish the building. Ranquist Development also did not return a call requesting more information on the project prior to deadline. However, on its Web site, the developer notes that it plans to develop the Wolcott property.

For his part, though, resident Ken Tyler—who lives in the home next door to the building—said he is disappointed that the lofts will likely be torn down. He said construction crews have already begun placing demolition fencing around the perimeter of the building. Tyler noted that he was planning to meet with Matlak yesterday afternoon to discuss the matter.

"I fully understand that if somebody buys a piece of property, they can pretty much do whatever they want, within a certain realm," he said. "But it’s a matter of protecting whatever we can protect."

At a BCO meeting in January, Matlak told that crowd that he agreed "in theory" that the building should remain as-is, but he worried that without a zoning change, the neighborhood could expect to see a worse development.

The artists and several small businesses that occupied the building were told in January that they would have to move out by March. The building has since been vacated.


-------------
This is what I found on Ranquist's site
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Old June 21st, 2006, 12:00 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy
http://www.chicagojournal.com/main.a...789&TM=74275.7

Wolcott lofts to fall
Demolition permit issued for Bucktown building

By KATHARINE GRAYSON, Staff Writer


Although the developer of the property at 1611-1627 N. Wolcott has apparently abandoned plans to seek a zoning change, the live/work lofts currently there are now expected to be torn down. According to the Web site for the city’s Building Department, the city issued a demolition permit for the building May 30; some neighbors had hoped the building could be saved.

Members of the Bucktown Community Organization had expressed interest in saving the building at a meeting held in January. At that time, the property’s new owner had requested that the neighborhood group support changing the zoning of the property from C1-2, a largely business class, to the residential designation of RT4.5, in order to build single-family homes.

In an interview two weeks ago, 32nd Ward Alderman Ted Matlak said he was aware that the developer, Ranquist Development, was no longer planning on seeking the zoning change. Matlak, could not be reached for comment before press time this week on the plans to demolish the building. Ranquist Development also did not return a call requesting more information on the project prior to deadline. However, on its Web site, the developer notes that it plans to develop the Wolcott property.

For his part, though, resident Ken Tyler—who lives in the home next door to the building—said he is disappointed that the lofts will likely be torn down. He said construction crews have already begun placing demolition fencing around the perimeter of the building. Tyler noted that he was planning to meet with Matlak yesterday afternoon to discuss the matter.

"I fully understand that if somebody buys a piece of property, they can pretty much do whatever they want, within a certain realm," he said. "But it’s a matter of protecting whatever we can protect."

At a BCO meeting in January, Matlak told that crowd that he agreed "in theory" that the building should remain as-is, but he worried that without a zoning change, the neighborhood could expect to see a worse development.

The artists and several small businesses that occupied the building were told in January that they would have to move out by March. The building has since been vacated.


-------------
This is what I found on Ranquist's site
^ I wouldn't mind seeing some of those cool mod. townhomes going up. I wish we could see more of those throughout the City.
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Old June 21st, 2006, 01:28 AM   #23
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This is bad news.....as more upscale banality replaces utilitarian urbanity
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Old June 21st, 2006, 01:37 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forumly_chgoman
This is bad news.....as more upscale banality replaces utilitarian urbanity

what pisses me off is that the water tower above it will be gone,
i love buildings with water towers,

the replacement buildings are okay
but are low rise and low density,
seems like bucktown and wickerpark
are becoming too exclusive

this ofcourse pales in comparison to the ultimate retarded teardown of the artful dodger but falls into the same category,
though atleast its not a landmark building and the replacement structures are cool though hoidy toity and too exclusive,

we need to accomodate the increased population in the city,
why the **** are we downsizing in bucktown?
so stupid

i ofcourse ABHOR the change in zoning in a CITY from
commercial to residential,
why in the hell are people moving in the city
if they dont like commercial around?

this is like the idiots who had moved near the lounge ax and then complained about the noise, (just an example)
its like dumbshit check out your neighborhood before you move in....



brand new single family homes in the city are a retarded idea,
but i guess must be in demand,
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Old June 21st, 2006, 07:36 AM   #25
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Those to me are plain old ugly. The 4+1's of this era. Too bad about that old warehouse being torn down, that building had character.
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 11:50 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammed wong
what pisses me off is that the water tower above it will be gone,
i love buildings with water towers...
Also, it is ironic that the city recently held a competition about what to do with these historic rooftop water towers, yet does nothing to prevent the demolition of the buildings on which the water towers are standing. Here is another article about the demolition.

From the Booster
Artist's haven razed
BY ANITRA ROWE

Tenants and neighbors of the three-story building at 1611-1627 N. Wolcott didn't want to see it come down.

But as the red bricks fell last week, most had accepted the change and were moving forward.

Renters in the Wolcott building learned in late 2005 that they would have to vacate the building to make way for redevelopment. A number of artists, entrepreneurs and residents in the building said the eviction notice was short and unofficial and that the building's architecture contributed to the neighborhood's eclectic flavor.

Ken and Carol Tyler, who live directly north of the construction site, initially were working with an attorney to ensure that their redevelopment concerns were taken seriously. Today, they are working directly with Alderman Ted Matlak, 32nd, and Ranquist Development.

Bob Ranquist, of Ranquist Development, said the company plans to build single-family homes under the existing C1-2 zoning, which allows residential space above the ground-level floor. It also allows a range of public, civic, commercial and industrial uses.

Ken Tyler said the developer has been "very receptive" to his concerns about dust and foundation problems that construction can cause. The demolition crew has put up fencing and has been running water to abate the dust, Tyler said. As for the foundation, Tyler said, "they're watching it very closely."

"That's as much as you can expect," he said.

Asbestos was another of Tyler's concerns, but he said the developer ran tests and none was found in the Wolcott building.

Tyler said the developer also will consider making the new building lower on the north end, the end nearest to the Tyler home, in order to allow sunlight to enter the home and garden. Tyler said he understands that the developer "can do what the law allows."

"So far, they've been very good to work with," Tyler said.

Objective Paradigm, a former tenant of the Wolcott building, moved into a new rental space at the end of May. The business now is set up at 805 N. Milwaukee Ave., as is former Wolcott tenant Fresh Tracks Music.

Kevin Krumm, managing director of Objective Paradigm, said his company looked at rental properties outside of Wicker Park, but was happy to find a place in the neighborhood.

"I think we ended up better off," said Krumm of their new location.

But whether the neighborhood, as a whole, is better off is debatable, some say.

Michael Moran, vice president of Preservation Chicago, said it's a shame for the neighborhood to lose the Wolcott building, as well as the water tower on the site, which Moran calls "a great exclamation point to the neighborhood skyline."

Moran said the Wolcott building was solidly built with "nice details." He also said the small businesses that rented space in the building "added to the atmosphere of the neighborhood."

"Without them, the neighborhood will be a little less interesting," Moran said. "That is taking the neighborhood in the wrong direction."

2006 The Booster
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Old August 29th, 2006, 12:43 AM   #27
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Urban Sandbox Bucktown
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Old August 29th, 2006, 02:37 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy
^ The Yo--Ranquist--new developments--the thing you just posted.

Did I just retrace your steps?

Thanks for posting those beauties
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Old August 30th, 2006, 08:05 AM   #29
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Looks like they're following me more than I'm following them
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Old October 13th, 2006, 06:30 AM   #30
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^ If this courtyard building project turns out anything like this rendering, it may be my favorite non-highrise neighborhood project in Chicago. But what really did it for me was on page 3 of this PDF:

http://jameson.com/images/pdf/northriver_flrplns.pdf
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Old October 30th, 2006, 04:50 AM   #31
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I honestly have no idea what neighborhood this is in, so I just guessed and put this article here. Does anyone have any pics of this Discount Mega Mall? This is from the Dept of P&D's website:

Mayor Richard M. Daley today introduced an ordinance into the Chicago City Council seeking authority for the Department of Planning and Development to acquire "Discount Mega Mall" at 2500-14 N. Milwaukee Ave. on the Northwest Side.
The block-long, 2.1-acre site has been vacant since June 2005, when the Cook County Circuit Court ordered the building closed after the building's owner was cited with 112 building, health, and safety code violations, some of which posed an immediate danger to the public.

Among the violations were a crumbling exterior facade, a faulty electrical system, blocked fire escapes and exits, and an accumulation of raw sewage resulting from an inoperable plumbing system.

"The City was left with no other choice but to move to acquire this property," Mayor Daley said. "The owner has repeatedly assured the City that the code violations would be corrected and has consistently failed in his responsibility to remedy the problems."

Between January 1995 and March 2005, the owner of the Mega Mall was repeatedly cited for violations of the City's Municipal Code. A Cook County Circuit Court case is still pending. While 150 vendors occupied the mall immediately prior to its closing, City records indicate that many of them were operating without licenses.

City acquisition of the shopping mall has the support of several community groups who would like to see the site transformed into a transit oriented mixed-use development adjacent to the CTA Blue Line that would include commercial and retail space and adjacent open space for use by neighborhood residents and visitors.
Damn, I moved into Logan Square (Logan Blvd and Kedzie Blvd) a little over 5 years ago, and moved over to lakeview 2 years ago. I don't have a car and sadly have not really made it back to Logan Square much at all. I'm AMAZED at all the new construction going up right there by the blue line stop. The mega mall was literally in my back yard, on the other side of the El tracks where they went underground. What an awesome piece of real estate! Right next to the subway, Milwaukee, Kedize, Diversey, the Blvds and their open spaces, the funky traffic circle and the Logan Auditorium. I really really really hope they understand what cool things they could do with that huge piece of real estate. This could really jump start this neighborhood that is just dying to boom (more than it is now).
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Old November 1st, 2006, 07:07 PM   #32
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Damn, I moved into Logan Square (Logan Blvd and Kedzie Blvd) a little over 5 years ago, and moved over to lakeview 2 years ago. I don't have a car and sadly have not really made it back to Logan Square much at all. I'm AMAZED at all the new construction going up right there by the blue line stop. The mega mall was literally in my back yard, on the other side of the El tracks where they went underground. What an awesome piece of real estate! Right next to the subway, Milwaukee, Kedize, Diversey, the Blvds and their open spaces, the funky traffic circle and the Logan Auditorium. I really really really hope they understand what cool things they could do with that huge piece of real estate. This could really jump start this neighborhood that is just dying to boom (more than it is now).

You should love this then. These are plans for Logan Square development from the City of Chicago's DPD. It was approved in '04 so I don't know if they've started any of the process, but it looks great. Hopefully the aquisition of the Mega Mall (ugly monstrosity) is part of the beginning.

Logan Square Open Space Plan
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Old November 4th, 2006, 03:46 AM   #33
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Looks like this project may go forward:

Flores hopeful regarding new financial center

First Ward Alderman Manny Flores spoke optimistically recently about South Elgin-based American Eagle Bank’s plans to open a new financial center on a vacant parcel of land on Ashland Avenue between Chicago Avenue and Huron Street. At the same time, he acknowledged parking issues may have to be resolved first.

"The question here is, 'what's the best plan for the neighborhood?’" Flores said. Describing Chicago and Ashland as a busy business and retail district—as well as home to a social service agency many people rely on—he noted anyone planning to construct a large new building in that vicinity should keep those conditions in mind in addition to other concerns of the people who live nearby.

Flores said he thought the property was zoned adequately for the type of facility American Eagle envisions. Information about the bank’s plans was discussed at a community meeting in August, and another meeting likely will be held on the subject, he said.

American Eagle Bank declined comment.

www.nearwestgazette.com
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Old November 4th, 2006, 10:06 AM   #34
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I hope we end up with another 12-15 story building. Several prominent intersections on the North Side have these, usually built by banks... All of them are vintage, though.
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Old December 8th, 2006, 11:58 PM   #35
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Chicago's next great park

The new website for the Friends of Bloomindale Trail is operational.

If your not familiar with the project, It's a cornerstone of the Logan Square Open Space Plan. The trail will be an elevated park with walking and bike paths running through Humbolt Park, Logan Square and Bucktown and ending at the North Branch. There will be access points at major roads and parks. Part of the plan also calls for the redevelopment of some of the parks and schoolyards that connect to the trail, for example, there is a very cool plan to add bleachers to Churchill Park. The bleachers will be built into the access point. Very cool design.

There is good support for the BT. Even if the other projects in the Logan Square Plan never come to fruition, I think you'll see this happen in 4 or 5 years, hopefully sooner.

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Old December 10th, 2006, 12:53 PM   #36
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Better yet they should bring back the old "L" line that used to go along that route.
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Old December 10th, 2006, 03:45 PM   #37
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Yea, i was debating in my head if that trail would be better served for part of a future east/west transit corridor of some kind or if it would be be better used for green space. Each are good and have their prons/cons I suppose. If the city ever wanted to I guess they could turn it from green space to a transit corridor at a later date.

I really like that webpage to creil.

I think it was talked about it in another thread a long while back but what are some of the other out of use rail routes that are abandoned in the city that could also be turned into future green space or a transit corridor? Is there any?
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Old December 10th, 2006, 07:49 PM   #38
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Yea, i was debating in my head if that trail would be better served for part of a future east/west transit corridor of some kind or if it would be be better used for green space. Each are good and have their prons/cons I suppose. If the city ever wanted to I guess they could turn it from green space to a transit corridor at a later date.

I really like that webpage to creil.

I think it was talked about it in another thread a long while back but what are some of the other out of use rail routes that are abandoned in the city that could also be turned into future green space or a transit corridor? Is there any?
^ My problem with turning rail ROW's into green trails is that returning these trails back to transit use is likely to encounter intense NIMBYism.

It's similar to trying to reintroduce the streetgrid into areas that are laden with cul-de-sacs (ie Dearborn Park). People living next to green trails will loathe the idea of giant trains roaring by their house.

Don't change rail ROW's into green space. Plain and simple
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Old December 10th, 2006, 11:04 PM   #39
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^ I agree with you TUP....once this is turned there is no going back


not to mention I believe that most....now now not all, but most opf Chicago is more than adequatley serviced by parks.....I really dont think we need anhy more parks unless there is a real compelling reason for it
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Old December 11th, 2006, 01:03 AM   #40
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^ My problem with turning rail ROW's into green trails is that returning these trails back to transit use is likely to encounter intense NIMBYism.

It's similar to trying to reintroduce the streetgrid into areas that are laden with cul-de-sacs (ie Dearborn Park). People living next to green trails will loathe the idea of giant trains roaring by their house.

Don't change rail ROW's into green space. Plain and simple
Agree'd. I'd like to see this as a CTA line first and a park second, but you have a couple of issues with turning it to transit (besides the obvious financial restraints of the CTA) that you don't have with making it a park.

1. All of the new development right on top of this line. You have new condos with balconies hanging over it. Some of these buildings are within an arms-length from any possible trains trying to go through there. You would have to tear down quite a bit of new development.

2. How would you incorporate this line into the rest of the CTA system? There is vacant land on the south side of the Bloomindale Line were it meets the Blue Line. Should be plenty of room for a connection, but that land is bought and paid for and due for commercial development any day now. If there were any plans to connect Blomingdale to Blue, then I think that land would still belong to the city.
Another option would be to run the line across the river to the current Finkl site. Since that site may be up for grabs now, the city could use it for a Bloomindale line. You could run the line underground from the river to the Clybourn station. It wouldn't be a very long tunnel to dig.
On the west end of the line, you could connect it to a possible future Mid-city Transitway running north-south along Cicero Ave, which could then give access to Midway and O'hare.

Honestly, I think the first issue is the biggest. Turning this line into transit would help to fill the needs of a vastly underserved northwest section of the city, but if it doesn't go rail, I like the bikeway plan for a second option.
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