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Old May 4th, 2007, 04:20 AM   #81
Mr Downtown
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I think it's important to distinguish between "car storage" in residential buildings and "transient parking" at businesses. The trip generation rates for residents of neighborhoods with good transit access are not usually of great concern, and seldom much of a danger to pedestrians. In a wealthy mobile society, people often find it convenient to own cars even if they don't use them very often.

Not that it makes much difference, but the Illinois law is that drivers must yield to pedestrians in their half of the roadway. This is different from California, where drivers must yield to peds in any part of the roadway. It is, of course, instruction and enforcement that makes the real difference.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 04:39 AM   #82
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@paytonc: Well said. That sums up the ongoing struggle to walk in this city quite succinctly.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:08 AM   #83
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Quote:
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It is, of course, instruction and enforcement that makes the real difference.
YES! Enforcement more than anything else. I once saw a guy in a Beamer run a stop sign by passing the guy in front of him who was stopping at the stop sign (Wabansia and Leavitt). He actually sped up to run the stop! No regard at all for any other cars or pedestrians who may have been in the intersection. Why would people do this unless they knew there wouldn't be much of a chance of getting caught?
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:41 AM   #84
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Old May 4th, 2007, 08:22 AM   #85
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This would be great. I'm at Milwaukee and Evergreen and there is an owner across the street that has 3 buildings in a row that are entirely under-utilized. He's been waiting for years for a developer to bite, and in the process, he's stunted a lot of the redevelopment between Wolcott and Evergreen on the south side of Milwaukee. There was a fire back in the early 90s in one of them and now they're shuttered upstairs.

Things just kind of die right at Evergreen and have been that way for years. The buildings are beautiful and those three actually pre-date the great fire, but they are in need of significant repair. If this goes through, he may be resigned to selling the places as existing structures rather than getting bigger $$$ for a mega-block tear down/redevelopment project. With the upside diminished, this may motivate him to get out now and sell each of them in use, rather than collecting 2X as much as a redevelopment.

I don't mind it for the Walgreen's, but why waste perfectly great housing/retail stock on a tear down?
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Old May 4th, 2007, 08:36 AM   #86
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^Are you talking about the building that houses the cheap suit store? I don't remember the name of the place but the suits in the window are God-awful.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 05:13 PM   #87
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It's honestly far easier to cross the street in Manhattan, Boston, Paris, almost anywhere -- including in many cities with far more aggressive drivers.
This statement is a joke
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Old May 4th, 2007, 07:09 PM   #88
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^Are you talking about the building that houses the cheap suit store? I don't remember the name of the place but the suits in the window are God-awful.
I try to avert my eyes from them anymore, so I couldn't tell you. They're the set of buildings directly across Evergreen from the Hollywood Cleaners. There was a bridal shop in one of them. No residents in those buildings = fewer eyes/foot traffic = more acts of vandalism. One of the worst places in the neighborhood for auto break-ins is Evergreen between the Cleaners and these places.
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Old May 4th, 2007, 08:47 PM   #89
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Milwaukee Ave. signs point to landmark

By Johnathon E. Briggs
Tribune staff reporter
Published May 3, 2007, 11:31 PM CDT

A stretch of Milwaukee Avenue in the Near Northwest Side neighborhood of Wicker Park was granted preliminary landmark designation Thursday by the Commission on Chicago Landmarks 16 years after advocates first proposed the distinction.

The commission unanimously recommended a proposed Milwaukee Avenue District, a roughly half-mile clutch of commercial buildings that date to 1877 and functioned as a "city within a city" for waves of immigrants. The corridor also played an important role in Chicago's economic development.

Preservationists and neighborhood groups have advocated for the district since 1991 to help counter development in the rapidly gentrifying area, which they contend has threatened the historic integrity of Wicker Park.

"Today is a day we feared would never come," said Jonathan Fine, president of the Preservation Chicago advocacy group. "The corridor is the oldest and perhaps the most intact in the city. It is high time we did this."

But opponents such as Barry Golin, whose pharmacy is within the proposed district, said they oppose its creation because they believe it will hinder development and diminish property values.

"The wholesale landmarking of a half-mile stretch of Milwaukee Avenue is a reckless thing to do," said Golin, who owns properties at 1366-70 N. Milwaukee Ave. "People who support it don't own property on Milwaukee."

The Milwaukee Avenue District would mainly protect the facades of about 150 buildings constructed between 1877 and 1929 in an area roughly from the 1200 to 1600 blocks of North Milwaukee Avenue, as well as properties in the 1900 and 2000 blocks of West North Avenue and the 1500 block of North Damen Avenue.

About half of the buildings are decorative three- or four-story commercial structures with a storefront at the street level and storage lofts or residential flats on the top.The proposed district is essentially an extension of the Wicker Park District, a multiblock area with a range of Victorian architecture that was granted landmark status in 1991. "It would be reckless not to approve this landmark designation," Ald. Manuel Flores (1st), whose ward includes Wicker Park, told the commission.

From the introduction of elevated train service to the area in 1895 to the economic depression of 1929, Milwaukee Avenue was transformed into a thriving commercial district, serving as the backbone of a growing neighborhood of immigrants, the driving force in the commercial development of the street.

The corridor was a port of entry for immigrants, first Germans and Scandinavians, followed by Poles in the late 19th Century, eastern European Jews in the early 20th Century and Latinos in the late 20th Century.

According to a report prepared by the city's Planning Department, the plethora of shops, services and businesses on Milwaukee formed a "city within a city" 3 miles from downtown. Lamps, wallpaper, window shades, and even cigars were manufactured in the upper floors of area lofts.

"The self-contained commercial district offered immigrant communities which it served a familiar and affordable alternative to the elite commercial core downtown," the report noted. Key buildings in the proposed district include the Northwest Tower office building, a 12-story, art deco-style gem clad in limestone at 1606-08 N. Milwaukee; the former Home/Bell Theater at 1539 N. Milwaukee, a rare example of an early movie theater; the Wieboldt's Department Store building at 1275-95 N. Milwaukee; and the North Avenue Bath building at 2037-41 W. North Ave. that features stylized fish and other aquatic-themed terra cotta.

The district also includes the one-story CTA Blue Line station house beneath the elevated tracks at 1556-58 N. Damen Ave., built in 1894. With its ornate pressed-brick facade, the station is one of the oldest surviving of its kind in the city. The next step is for the city Department of Planning and Development to review the proposed district's impact on the surrounding neighborhood.

[email protected]

Copyright © 2007, Chicago Tribune
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Old May 5th, 2007, 12:14 AM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prelude91 View Post
This statement is a joke
How is it a joke? Except for the avenues (and avenue traffic "platoons" beautifully -- i.e., it moves in pulses, with great big open gaps in between) and obviously not in Midtown or along the highways, there is usually so little traffic on Manhattan neighborhood streets you really can just cross anywhere, anytime. The same goes for the medieval grids in most European cities. Infamously surly Boston drivers stop at un-signaled crosswalks just like they do in Seattle; this NEVER happens in Chicago.

Now, I know that you guys get off on anything tall, but surely even this is an insult: a sketch of the parking + apartment cube proposed for behind the Northwest Tower ("Coyote building"):

image hosted on flickr


A 50' x 150' array of giant precast concrete panels, apparently arranged by a dentist, topped by what appears to be an aluminum panel grid reminiscent of the Hot Trend circa 1965. 51 luxury rental apartments, 248 (!) parking spaces, retail, keep the existing building in its 77-year tradition of losing money as offices.
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Last edited by paytonc; May 5th, 2007 at 07:43 PM.
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Old May 5th, 2007, 06:38 AM   #91
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Quote:
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image hosted on flickr


A 50' x 150' array of giant precast concrete panels, topped by what appears to be an aluminum panel grid reminiscent of the finest architecture circa 1965.
^ Ouch, I was hoping somebody had some info on this building.

So in other words, YET ANOTHER in a long line of disappointing developments in which nobody even bothers to ask the developer to keep parking away from the streetscape, and thus we have 4 levels of parking boring the shit out of everybody. And the beat goes on, drums keep pounding the suburbs through my brain. Nice job, Alder*******. Go **** yourself while you're trying to find a new job.

I'm with the NIMBY's on this one..
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Old May 5th, 2007, 11:28 PM   #92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by i_am_hydrogen View Post
[B][SIZE=4]
"The wholesale landmarking of a half-mile stretch of Milwaukee Avenue is a reckless thing to do," said Golin, who owns properties at 1366-70 N. Milwaukee Ave. "People who support it don't own property on Milwaukee."
What the hell? Milwaukee property owners are precisely the people who should NOT be making preservation decisions, because they have a financial stake.

This is one case where the neighborhood should be able to dictate. It's not downtown, so it's not as if they're irrationally blocking new developments based on height.

By the way, are the Walgreens and other development like it exempted from landmark status? I know they exempted postwar buildings in the Michigan Avenue Landmark District.
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Old May 6th, 2007, 06:15 AM   #93
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By the way, are the Walgreens and other development like it exempted from landmark status? I know they exempted postwar buildings in the Michigan Avenue Landmark District.
The Walgreens would not be given protection.
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Old May 10th, 2007, 05:34 PM   #94
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Neighbors kill seven-story condo plan
Flores adds Walgreens site into proposed historic district

By TIMOTHY INKLEBARGER
Staff Writer


Following neighborhood opposition to a seven-story condominium on the 1300 block of Milwaukee, 1st Ward Alderman Manny Flores says he's sending the proposal back to the drawing board.

Flores also said the parcel of land that currently houses a Walgreens drugstore on the corner of Wolcott and Milwaukee will be included in the proposed Milwaukee Avenue Historic District. The district, which runs roughly between Paulina and Damen, was given preliminary approval last week by the Landmarks Commission, setting in motion a number of aesthetic guidelines for rehabs of existing buildings and new construction.

At a community meeting in late April, neighbors almost unanimously rejected the proposal by Chicago-based Preferred Development to construct a 79-foot-tall building with 81 units and 153 parking spaces.

"There is no support for the project," Flores said. "Some [neighbors] were dead set against it, and then there was a real concern about the size."

In order to build the massive structure, the project would have required a significant zoning increase. But with the approval of the historic district, the developer also will have to follow guidelines set forth by the city's Landmarks Division. Although the Walgreens is included in the historic district it is not considered an historic structure that contributes to the district. Preferred Development still could demolish the building -a proposition most neighbors welcome-but the development would have to stay within the scale of the existing two- and three-flat buildings.
The current B1-2 zoning allows for a 50-foot-tall building with 32 units.

"If [the developers] would ever ask for some type of city privilege or benefit like those under consideration, then they are going to have to continue with the same [public] process," Flores said.

He said he hopes the developers engage the community if they build under the current zoning.

Craig Norris, chairman of the Wicker Park Committee's zoning subcommittee, said it is in the best interest of the neighborhood to include the building in the landmark district. He added that the modern "glass-box" proposal is not a "cutting-edge" design.

"The landmark ordinance says that scale and density have to be respected, and the current zoning on Milwaukee is four stories," Norris said.

CONTACT: [email protected].
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Old May 11th, 2007, 06:13 AM   #95
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He added that the modern "glass-box" proposal is not a "cutting-edge" design.
^ I'm not even sure what that means..
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Old June 14th, 2007, 08:22 PM   #96
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2028 West Division
6 units + retail
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Old June 16th, 2007, 07:59 PM   #97
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...ck=1&cset=true

BUCKTOWN BLUES:

Levi's plans to open a store at 1552 N. Milwaukee Ave. in Bucktown on Friday, according to Chicago-based Baum Realty Group. The store joins a string of national chains that have moved into the boutique-lined neighborhood in the past two years, including Urban Outfitters, G-Star Denim, Scoop and American Apparel.
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Old June 17th, 2007, 09:45 AM   #98
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Wow - an Urban Outfitters that's actually in the city.
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Old June 17th, 2007, 08:19 PM   #99
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Wow - an Urban Outfitters that's actually in the city.
There is one in Lakeview and one in the Gold Coast.
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Old August 9th, 2007, 05:07 AM   #100
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Another recent example of NIMBY's who want bigger. What's going on?

For this corner, bigger is better

August 8, 2007
By MARK LAWTON Staff Writer
When it comes to real estate development, neighborhood organizations usually argue for smaller and less.

The East Village Association, however, suggests that sometimes bigger is better, at least when it comes to the Southwest corner of Division and Ashland. A Pizza Hut located there for about 20 years closed several months ago. Word has it that Walgreen's aims to buy the property and build single-story drug store.

In July, the East Village Association passed a resolution. While the residential organization has nothing against Walgreen's, it would like to see something both taller and wider, perhaps of the same mass as the MB Bank building on the Northwest corner...
http://www.pioneerlocal.com/booster2...807-s1.article
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