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Old May 12th, 2014, 09:46 AM   #5301
Jim856796
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A rail rapid transit line having one or multiple branches: Will this affect the line's frequency/headway in any way?
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Old May 12th, 2014, 10:34 AM   #5302
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Having a branch will alter the reliability of the line, though it is more terminus capacity (how many trains can you turn around), signalling, and the capacity of the branch's junctions that will affect frequency rather that merely the branch.

In London, the Victoria line has just recently reached 34tph for an hour in the am peak - with no branches, and you won't get more down it or the Jubilee. There's lots of talk about branching tube lines reaching 32tph in the near future - even flat junctions don't seem to be too much of an issue if signalled and managed properly.

And the most frequent ever metro line was the District line 100 years ago: despite (and partially because of the need to serve) several branches, it ran at over 40tph. Of course it was much slower and less reliable because of the short headways, and so they stopped running that high level of service when the Piccadilly removed some branches in 1932. It will be 32tph come 2018, up from the current 28tph.
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Old May 12th, 2014, 12:41 PM   #5303
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I meant will the metro line's headway have to be increased or lowered because the it has a branch line? Also, can frequencies/headways of a metro route be affected by one or more metro lines sharing the same track?

A train attempting to merge from the branch line to the main line collides with a train travelling on the main line; Can such an accident really occur? For example, a train running on the Hammersmith & City Line collides with a train running on the Circle Line. That would be tragic.
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Old May 12th, 2014, 06:27 PM   #5304
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sotonsi View Post
In London, the Victoria line has just recently reached 34tph for an hour in the am peak - with no branches, and you won't get more down it or the Jubilee. There's lots of talk about branching tube lines reaching 32tph in the near future - even flat junctions don't seem to be too much of an issue if signalled and managed properly.
The jubilee line is planned to go up the 36tph by the end of this decade as it's been mentioned in the bond street cooling program documents as well as the reason behind the OJEU for clones of the 1996 stock.

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Originally Posted by Jim856796 View Post
I meant will the metro line's headway have to be increased or lowered because the it has a branch line? Also, can frequencies/headways of a metro route be affected by one or more metro lines sharing the same track?

A train attempting to merge from the branch line to the main line collides with a train travelling on the main line; Can such an accident really occur? For example, a train running on the Hammersmith & City Line collides with a train running on the Circle Line. That would be tragic.
Depends, many branches running over one section results in a higher frequency: from example the northern stretch of the circle has a higher frequency because it also interfaces with the Hammersmith and City and the met which increase the frequency. Yes because if say lines a and b share track and line a suffers a delay then trains will miss their paths through the shared section delaying line Bs trains.

No because the London Underground is signalled and fitted with many different safety systems. On the circle and Hammersmith lines you have the traditional LU tripcock system where if a train passes a signal at danger the tripcock will activate and stop the train. On lines using ATO you have ATP which protects the trains (while ATO drives them)
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Old May 21st, 2014, 11:57 PM   #5305
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The capacity of the London Underground's S Stock is 856 passengers (in a 7-car trainset) and 1,003 (in an 8-car trainset). I would assume that these capacity figures would include both seated and standing passengers?
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Old May 22nd, 2014, 12:10 AM   #5306
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Yes
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Old June 5th, 2014, 06:29 AM   #5307
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Do some rail rapid transit lines have to be built underground because of aesthetic reasons? Also, I would think that, if a city has a high water table, having to build an overground rail rapid transit line is practically unavoidable.
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Old June 5th, 2014, 02:12 PM   #5308
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim856796 View Post
Do some rail rapid transit lines have to be built underground because of aesthetic reasons?
Yes. Though aesthetics is not the only reason to build underground.
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Also, I would think that, if a city has a high water table, having to build an overground rail rapid transit line is practically unavoidable.
Yet it was London, with its sodden clay, that pionereed underground railways...
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Old June 6th, 2014, 03:17 AM   #5309
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Any other reasons/factors in building rail transit lines underground (despite potential expenses)?
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Old June 6th, 2014, 12:23 PM   #5310
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Quote:
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Any other reasons/factors in building rail transit lines underground (despite potential expenses)?
Could you imagine trying to put an elevated railway line through London. We're not the US with their neatly laid out roads, it's still got a medieval street plan in some places. I'd doubt so many people would want to go shopping underneath a metal bridge which would also obscure the façade of the buildings. For it to serve all our railway terminals would mean a bridge in front of their grand façades. In the case of Euston it's not much of a bother but can you imagine sitting in kings cross square under the shadow of the overhead tube line.
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Old June 7th, 2014, 03:11 AM   #5311
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If you're spending more than 10 minutes at a station you should ask for the Station supervisor for permission
Alright, thanks for the advice.
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Old July 12th, 2014, 06:03 AM   #5312
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Originally Posted by Accura4Matalan View Post
wtf is the tube?
..

Last edited by Subsequence; March 8th, 2017 at 04:10 PM.
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Old July 21st, 2014, 11:20 AM   #5313
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TfL to re-zone Stratford stations

TfL to re-zone Stratford stations

Stratford, Stratford International and Stratford High Street stations will all become part of Zone 2 from January 2016.

Transport for London will re-zone Stratford as part of the Mayor's plans to create a new cultural hub in the Queen Elizabeth Park called "Olympicopolis".

The move into Zone 2/3 will cost Transport for London about £7m annually, but it's hoped Stratford will become more accessible as part of the Olympic legacy.



The Mayor's team is searching for designers to create the so-called 'Olympicopolis' - a new cultural and educational quarter which will feature installments from Sadler's Wells and The Victoria and Albert Museum.

The idea for the new quarter on the Olympic park site is inspired by the achievements of Prince Albert, who used the proceeds of the 1851 Great Exhibition to create ‘Albertopolis’ – the 86 acre site around Exhibition Road in South Kensington.

"Our goal is to create thousands of new jobs whilst driving up the life chances and opportunities of local people to match those enjoyed across the capital. Huge progress is being made with Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park now re-opened and the planned move of the Financial Conduct Authority and Transport for London bringing 5,500 jobs to new offices into area. The launch today of a global hunt for top design talent to create a world class cultural and higher educational quarter on Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will stimulate even further growth."

– THE MAYOR OF LONDON, BORIS JOHNSON

Olympicopolis

From ITV News
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Old August 3rd, 2014, 02:32 AM   #5314
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Is there any idea what the frequencies/headways are of some of the suburban railway networks of Oceanian and South African cities, such as Sydney, Auckland, Johannesburg, Melbourne and Cape Town?
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Old August 13th, 2014, 09:19 PM   #5315
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Does anyone know a good source of photos of London's tube system? I am looking to share them on a facebook subway page. I am not crazed nor am I demented. I am an American. lol But I have worn out the collections of wikipedia and wikimedia. I am especially seeking older stuff, from before 1950, but I will be happy to see any source of anything tube related. Thank you.
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Old August 14th, 2014, 06:33 AM   #5316
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim856796 View Post
Is there any idea what the frequencies/headways are of some of the suburban railway networks of Oceanian and South African cities, such as Sydney, Auckland, Johannesburg, Melbourne and Cape Town?
I can answer on behalf of Sydney: The Sydney network is pretty much a suburban commuter railway, a regional railway and an inner city metro rolled into one so frequency varies a great deal depending on which part of the network you're talking about. In the inner part of the network services are typically quite frequent - in peak 20 trains per hour, but in outer parts or where there are constraints such as sharing tracks with freight and other lines, line frequency can drop to as few as two trains per hour. There's even one line that is still only single track and therefore can only manage one service an hour!
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Old October 25th, 2014, 09:28 AM   #5317
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New signage for the tube?!

https://imgur.com/a/lUWTG
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Old November 21st, 2014, 07:26 AM   #5318
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Which of these can carry more people: A controlled-access highway (freeway/expressway), or a single rail rapid transit line?

Assuming these factors:
* The highway and rail line are of similar length.
* Dependent on how many lanes the controlled access highway has.
* Dependent on the size of the trains on the metro line, or how many stations the metro line has.
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Old November 21st, 2014, 10:01 PM   #5319
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2200 cars per lane per hour, 800 people per subway car (in Brussels), 1 each 1.5 min (good performance), so 32000 persons.

Assuming 2 people per car (VERY optimistic), that equals about 7.5 lanes.
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Old December 14th, 2014, 03:44 AM   #5320
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Mr Tubman, Could this forum be segregated into regions? It would make it easier to find the various systems.
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