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Old April 29th, 2006, 10:43 AM   #581
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnoldsa
Mr. Tubeman, can a 4-lane tunnel (around 1.2 km long) for vehicles be also called a subway? Or does a subway only refer to underground railways?
Errr...

I'd call it a road tunnel myself. Subways refer to underground railways (outside the UK) or to pedestrian underpasses (in the UK).
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Old April 29th, 2006, 10:46 AM   #582
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean Luc
Tubeman, could land value taxation (LVT) be used to finance the construction of new lines? When the Jubilee Line was extended through South London and the Docklands area some properties near the new stations increased in value by up to four times! These windfall gains for the few lucky property owners could have been taxed to help pay for the line's construction, as explained in the booklet "Taken for a Ride" by Don Riley, himself a property owner and developer in the area. Perhaps the building of new lines could even be self-financing using this method, meaning that their proponents would not have to go cap-in-hand to the government for funding from general revenue, but instead could say that the line would pay for itself, giving the scheme a greater chance of being approved by the bean counters.

To get an idea of what I mean, check out the following:
http://www.samuelbrittan.co.uk/text89_p.html
http://www.labourland.org/in_the_new...w_approach.php

The opinions expressed are those of the authors, and although I don't agree with everything they say I believe that they make a valid case for using LVT to finance new lines. Indeed, new construction could be expedited by using this funding method.

What do you think?
Yes, I've often thought this is a great idea... Buy up property en masse along the route of a proposed line then sell it on after it opens to recoup costs. The only trouble with this is that prices start to rise at the merest threat of a new line, so the property-buying and planning stages would have to be very covert to maximise revenue. As soon as people got wind of the fact that LUL were buying up property in an area the prices would go crazy.
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Old April 29th, 2006, 11:35 AM   #583
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Whoa I JUST noticed this thread.

Hey Tubeman, I might have seen you in Earl's Court! Is there any plans in Earl's Court station to help divert the frequent sudden crowds of tourists?
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Old April 29th, 2006, 02:30 PM   #584
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Strangely, the Glasgow Underground is sometimes called the subway too!
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Old April 29th, 2006, 05:54 PM   #585
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachmaninov
Whoa I JUST noticed this thread.

Hey Tubeman, I might have seen you in Earl's Court! Is there any plans in Earl's Court station to help divert the frequent sudden crowds of tourists?
Its just been redeveloped so not any time soon. Congestion can get very bad, especially with a concert at Earl's Court or football at Chelsea. The recent revamp cleared structures off the platforms (the kiosks) to maximise space, but the stairwells down to platforms 5 & 6 are a pinch-point.
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Old April 29th, 2006, 05:55 PM   #586
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samsonyuen
Strangely, the Glasgow Underground is sometimes called the subway too!
Yes interestingly this was the first use of the word in the sense of underground railway; it was called 'subway' from opening, before New York had any of its subway.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 08:18 PM   #587
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Ill rescue your thread with a 2 questions.
Are there plans to lengthen the platforms on various lines to accomodate longer trains? It would probably be expensive but it seems like one of the easiest solutions to adding extra capacity.
Secondly, are there collector shoes on both sides of the train? That is to say does the outside power rail always have to be on one side or can the train pick up power no matter what side the rail is on
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Old May 25th, 2006, 03:00 AM   #588
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Thanks for bringing it back from the dead

1) Lengthening

The only plan I'm aware of is to extend those at Notting Hill Gate and Bayswater (Circle / District Lines) to allow 7 car trains of the new 'S Stock' to run across the entire District / Circle / Hammersmith & City Lines. The Metropolitan Line will be 8 cars (as at present).

2) Collector Shoes

Yes, they are on both sides of the bogies (as well as in the middle) as the Positive rail (the one on the outside of the running rails) switches between right and left. In general its to the left, but through a station it switches to the right if the platform is on the left. This is basically because it carries the highest current of the two current rails, so the logic is if someone falls off the platform they would ideally be as far from it as possible.
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Old May 25th, 2006, 03:40 AM   #589
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
Yes, they are on both sides of the bogies (as well as in the middle) as the Positive rail (the one on the outside of the running rails) switches between right and left. In general its to the left, but through a station it switches to the right if the platform is on the left. This is basically because it carries the highest current of the two current rails, so the logic is if someone falls off the platform they would ideally be as far from it as possible.
I figured as much
Another question. Im going to back be in London June 1st-8th . and havent been back since 1999. Besides canary wharf, what else is interesting on the jubiliee extension?
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Old May 25th, 2006, 04:04 AM   #590
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And yet another question. Where can trains be accessed on either side? That is where there are platforms on either side of the track. Right now ive found the center track at loughton, center track at arnos grove, central track at cockfosters, and the center and left track at uxbridge, as well as center track at canary wharf (dlr). Any others?
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Old May 25th, 2006, 09:00 AM   #591
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Maybe it's because I go into it everyday, but I really enjoy the circular station (sort of) that Westminster is. Stratford and Southwark are pretty nice stations too.
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Old May 25th, 2006, 09:45 AM   #592
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_storms
And yet another question. Where can trains be accessed on either side? That is where there are platforms on either side of the track. Right now ive found the center track at loughton, center track at arnos grove, central track at cockfosters, and the center and left track at uxbridge, as well as center track at canary wharf (dlr). Any others?
Golders Green, Morden, Barking Eastbound too... I think that could be it
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Old May 27th, 2006, 02:21 AM   #593
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Right two questions:

1. Do the drivers have a certain 'patch' as in will a driver who drives a train on the Met line only drive trains on the Met line or do you drive trains on all the lines?

2. On the East London/Metropolitan trains, what are the grey sphere shapes at the end of each carriage, on the inside, above the door? Are they cameras?
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Old May 27th, 2006, 10:20 AM   #594
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Has there ever been a bid to put CCTV cameras on trains at the height of the IRA bombings or after 7/7?
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Old May 30th, 2006, 03:33 PM   #595
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDRS
Right two questions:

1. Do the drivers have a certain 'patch' as in will a driver who drives a train on the Met line only drive trains on the Met line or do you drive trains on all the lines?

2. On the East London/Metropolitan trains, what are the grey sphere shapes at the end of each carriage, on the inside, above the door? Are they cameras?
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Old May 30th, 2006, 05:53 PM   #596
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDRS
Right two questions:

1. Do the drivers have a certain 'patch' as in will a driver who drives a train on the Met line only drive trains on the Met line or do you drive trains on all the lines?

2. On the East London/Metropolitan trains, what are the grey sphere shapes at the end of each carriage, on the inside, above the door? Are they cameras?
1) Drivers are restricted to a depot of one line only, although Edgware Road Depot drivers cover 2 lines (Hammersmith & City and Circle), and I believe the Waterloo & City Line is operated by Central Line drivers from Leytonstone Depot. If, as a driver, you transfer to a different line you'll need full stock (train) and road (route knowledge) training, typically about 1 month.

2) Not cameras, if a passenger alarm is operated in that carriage it'll illuminate. They're there so the driver can spot which carriage the alarm has been operated in, as there are no other indications in an 'A' Stock train.
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Old May 30th, 2006, 05:56 PM   #597
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr_storms
I figured as much
Another question. Im going to back be in London June 1st-8th . and havent been back since 1999. Besides canary wharf, what else is interesting on the jubiliee extension?
Do you mean in terms of stations or in terms of places to visit?

Each Jubilee Line Extension station was designed by a different architect, and they're all pretty impressive. Canary Wharf is stunning, certainly the most impressive but they're all worth a look except maybe West Ham.

I'd also recommend in particular Westminster and Southwark
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Old May 30th, 2006, 07:30 PM   #598
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Your reference to the W&C line drivers made me wonder: is there any kind of restriction on how long you can work on this line? Given that it is just a shuttle going back and forth, are drivers still expected to do a regular shift on it, all day every day, or are they changed more often to stop them from getting bored/complacent/sleepy?
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Old May 30th, 2006, 08:28 PM   #599
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jetsetwilly
Your reference to the W&C line drivers made me wonder: is there any kind of restriction on how long you can work on this line? Given that it is just a shuttle going back and forth, are drivers still expected to do a regular shift on it, all day every day, or are they changed more often to stop them from getting bored/complacent/sleepy?
My understanding is that the W&C Line is on the Leytonstone roster so you'd work it every few weeks, but some drivers prefer it and swap shifts to work it near-permanently. Mad, if you ask me.

The longest continuous driving spell allowed is 4.25 hours, with a daily maximum of 8... A 'rounder' on the W&C line (i.e. there and back plus terminus time) must be in the order of 15-20 minutes (4 minutes each way, 4 minutes dwell time at each end), so conceivably in a day a driver might have to endure 20+ 'rounders'. I'd be jumping under my own train after a few...

The closest I've ever worked to this is the Kensington Olympia to High Street Kensington shuttle, its a 6 minute run and you'd never do a whole day of them, so at worst you'd do 8 rounders before or after Meal relief. Most of it is above ground and they're actually ok because you spend most of your time at the termini. Also, when the Northern Line goes 'up the wall' (which is often!) and you're the train at Mill Hill East, you get instructed to work a shuttle between Mill Hill East and Finchley Central to ensure a regular service. Again, I didn't mind this... Its better than tunnel work and its quite a nice run, including the highest viaduct on the Underground (across Dollis Brook).
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Old May 30th, 2006, 09:45 PM   #600
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Interesting term for lunch... "Meal Relief"
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