daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 26th, 2005, 02:49 AM   #81
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme
Thanks Tubeman, but it seems their website isn't very clear. The map here seems to indicate it goes to Paddington. Maybe I'm reading it wrong, I'm on my 7th Martini by now.

http://www.heathrowconnect.com/default.aspx?pageid=1
It looks like they've extended the service into Paddington, my apologies!
Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 26th, 2005, 02:50 AM   #82
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by pricemazda
but you don't find the escalators at Selfridges breaking down every 2 weeks, or the ones at heathrow that require being completely boarded up for 2 years (@Brixton an escalator was out for 2 1/2 years while being fixed)
Welcome to the world of Public Private Partnership and the most incompetent bunch of cowboy contractors you'll ever encounter
Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2005, 03:30 AM   #83
invincible
Lurker
 
invincible's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 3,804
Likes (Received): 523

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
You can presumably travel from Wick in Northern Scotland all the way to Vladivostock in Siberia non stop... perhaps even further into China... I don't know which gauge they use (I know SE Asia is 1m gauge).

So tens of thousands of kilometres, basically.
They say the longest line with a passenger service is Pyongyang to Moscow, so in theory you could go from Wick to Pyongyang. Not that I'd think there would be much demand for the route.

I believe China uses a different gauge. Still better than the Sydney-Perth trains when they started running though - there were 5 breaks of gauge until they standardised it in the 70s.

And public private partnerships? Melbourne's rail network is contracted out to an operator at a fixed rate and the government's too stingy to pay for expansion. Can't even electrify 10km of track and build two stations for a line extension without cost cutting.
invincible no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2005, 11:16 AM   #84
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by invincible
They say the longest line with a passenger service is Pyongyang to Moscow, so in theory you could go from Wick to Pyongyang. Not that I'd think there would be much demand for the route.

I believe China uses a different gauge. Still better than the Sydney-Perth trains when they started running though - there were 5 breaks of gauge until they standardised it in the 70s.

And public private partnerships? Melbourne's rail network is contracted out to an operator at a fixed rate and the government's too stingy to pay for expansion. Can't even electrify 10km of track and build two stations for a line extension without cost cutting.
Yes I was aghast to see 'Connex' emblazened on all of the Melbourne trains the last time I was there... They had two franchises on suburban lines in Kent, Sussex and Surrey (South of London) which were taken off them because they were so bad. They're French I believe?

Re: The Indian-Pacific... How did that work, with 5 different gauges?

At each point where it changed was everyone turfed off one train onto another?

The Great Western Railway and Metropolitan Railway (the first Underground Railway) were both dual gauge for a time... a massive 7 foot plus Standard 4'8.5"

Baker Street Station, you can see the 'Third rail', which was nothing to do with electricity supply! Look how wide the GWR 7 ft gauge was!

Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2005, 09:03 PM   #85
Rational Plan
Registered User
 
Rational Plan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Slough
Posts: 3,672
Likes (Received): 678

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
Yes, but with one fatal flaw... It terminates at Ealing Broadway so doesn't provide a direct service to Central London
The Heathrow Connect service does terminate at Paddington, they just don't advertise it. To protect BAA's investment in the Heathrow express tunnels, Heathrow express remains the only advertised service. Plus you can not buy tickets from Paddington to Heathrow. The trains from Paddington advertise a service to Hayes and Harlington, the last stop before the tunnels and the last station that travelcards are valid. You can only buy tickets to Heathrow once you get to Ealing Broadway. This applies in the opposite direction, so at Heathrow it says 'Ealing Broadway' and you can only buy a ticket to London at Hayes and Harlington.

The service also relieves pressure on the inner suburban stations, as it is the only service where you have a good chance of getting a seat in the rush hour. They had to re juggle the existing time table to fit this service in. The result some longer distance suburban services stop at stations west of the airport junction to compensate for the loss of one stopping service and the also now run longer trains.
Rational Plan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 02:38 AM   #86
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
With Earl's Court the decision as to which platform a train will go into is made last minute by the 'First Come' signalling principle I mentioned previously. Therefore an Ealing Train might be departing Gloucester Road, but its not until just outside Earl's Court that the signalling 'knows' which platform it will go into... therefore a 'dot matrix' indicator familiar at most stations would remain blank until about 1 minute before the train rolls in... Not very useful!

Regarding some boards remaining blank, it depends on the geography leading up to that platform. A good example is where I wait every day to go home, Earl's Court Eastbound Piccadilly Line Platform. You'll never see any time longer than 3 minutes advertised, it will be blank until then. This is because 3 minutes away at Baron's Court there is the junction between the District and Piccadilly Lines (technically 'fast' and 'slow') and the system cannot 'know' for sure where the next train will come from as often Engineer's trains will be routed off the District onto the Piccadilly at Barons Court which would 'confuse' the system.

Hi Tubeman,

whilst this makes sense I allways thought that it was because the station's "historic" status and that London Underground was not allowed to replace them!

Of course another reason why some boards are blank is that there are more spaces than destinations. For instance, District line trains no longer serve the Rayners Lane or Hounslow branches (westbound) or Southend-On-Sea (Eastbound).

And, nowadays all their trains stop at all stations - although not old enough to remember it I have read about a time when some District Line trains did not stop at all stations.

Its a shame that the "Southend Corridor Express" no longer runs - oh, if only I could time travel.... of course with my modern era digicam too ~~ hey, I'd have all the publishing houses chasing me for a book contract too!!!!!

Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 02:50 AM   #87
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
'Heathrow Connect' started running this Summer from Ealing Broadway to Heathrow Airport stopping all stations (all 4 of them if I remember correctly). Heathrow Express obviously didn't want it running into Paddington and competeing with their cosy and extortionate monopoly! Its primarily a local service for airport workers, as thousands of the tens of thousands working at Heathrow live in the Southall / Hanwell / Ealing areas. I suppose its slightly useful for people in West London going to the airport to travel, but they also have the Piccadilly Line.

The Olympia service was always exhibition traffic only until 1986, when we experimented with providing a 15 minute service all day every day. Kensington Olympia has actually proved to be a pretty busy station, especially now it has regular Mainline trains. In the rush hour I see over a hundred passengers getting on each train to Olympia from my office window, and when an exhibition is on at Olympia it can get very busy (which is a lot of the time).

Tubeman,

re: the Olympia service, thats only since WW2. before then there was a regular electric service between Earls Court and Willesden Junction, using LMS electric trains. But the present arrangement is better, with the west London Line running between Willesden and Clapham junctions. It will be even better when trains run more frequently...

Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.

Last edited by spsmiler; November 27th, 2005 at 03:00 AM.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 02:59 AM   #88
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
Yes, but with one fatal flaw... It terminates at Ealing Broadway so doesn't provide a direct service to Central London
there are many who would say that Paddington is not central London!!! (western edge central area perhaps)

I wish the trains travelled along the North London Line stopping at busy stations only and ran to Stratford - or even Barking and / or Stansted Airport! OK, I would still have to change train to catch it but it would be far far far far more useful, bringing direct rail services to many people who avoid the underground because of crowds, steps, etc which when travelling with luggage can make life more difficult.

As an aside, apart from (possibly) a short distance of track where the GW and NL lines meet the whole route is already electrified on the overhead wire system, so it this service could be introduced very easily. Maybe it will happen for the Olympics, if they happen.

Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 03:16 AM   #89
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman
Welcome to the world of Public Private Partnership and the most incompetent bunch of cowboy contractors you'll ever encounter
Oh its worse than that - it seems that the PPP has cost us all financially too.

I dont recall the exact terminology but an investigation by what I think was a House of Commons Audit ctte (ie: the British Parliament) found that the chosen method of PPP is costing about £1 billion more than the best of the other options, which I seem to recall were the Bonds sold on the City of London's Financial markets.

Now, tell me, what could we have done with £1 billion???

I would put the money towards the East London Line conversion into being part of the new full outer circle, the Cross River Tramway, Croydoin Tramlink extensions, and to ensure that all Londoners benefit electrify London's busiest bus routes. Yes, bring back trolleybuses, which have the same environmental advantages as trams but are more flexible for busy streets where there is no space for dedicated rights of way. Of course I would use modern, stylish, sophisticated designed trolleybuses. Getting rid of dirty diesels would lead to very significant health benefits for ALL Londoners. Diesel exhust fumes kill - see this webpage for more info .. www.etfl.co.uk

btw, for overseas readers, the new outer circle would be a bit like Berlin's Ring, ie: an urban line but a little outside of the city centre. For London it would operate as a horseshoe, with trains travelling via the west, south, east and west London lines, terminating at Clapham Junction. For reasons of geography the trains would have to "turn around" there, which is why they would terminate. As Tubeman explained earlier when discussing the London Underground Circle Line, there are advantages in running services with proper "ends" and not as plain circles.
Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.

Last edited by spsmiler; November 27th, 2005 at 03:46 AM.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 03:21 AM   #90
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by invincible

And public private partnerships? Melbourne's rail network is contracted out to an operator at a fixed rate and the government's too stingy to pay for expansion. Can't even electrify 10km of track and build two stations for a line extension without cost cutting.
sounds like Britain!!!

Seriously though, your network was split into four (2 x trams and 2 x trains) and then some of British companies who won the franchises got up and walked away. Hope that never happens here!

btw, which rail line wont they electrify? - I ask because I recently read about new trains on routes such as to Bendigo, (and track singling reducing serviice capacity) plus I know you are regularly having extensions added to your tram system...

Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 03:34 AM   #91
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorker1
What is the length of the longest train line?
Central Line?? @34 miles, although maybe a bit less now that the Onger branch no longer exists - although I think that all distances are still calculated from Ongar!

Hopefully Tubeman will know.

Its possible that the longest "sensible" journey might be different - Aldgate to Chesham I would guess, taking about an hour, although nowadays the trains run more slowly than they used to - their maximum speed has beenr educed to 60 mph (from 71 mph) and the fast trains call at Harrow-On-The-Hill.

In the early 1990's some trains would run non-stop between Finchley Road and Moor Park, a journey which took about 19 minutes. Woe betide anyone who did not check the destination information and caught the wrong train - and then saw it running through stations (OK: some without platforms on their tracks) without stopping....

I have some videotape of trains running through Harrow-On-The-Hill non stop. Maybe I should get it digitised and on the Internet! I need a way to convert it into mpeg or avi, my Applel computer already has a video card, but is an old Powermac so only runs OS 9.2.

Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 12:51 PM   #92
Rational Plan
Registered User
 
Rational Plan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Slough
Posts: 3,672
Likes (Received): 678

Quote:
Originally Posted by spsmiler
there are many who would say that Paddington is not central London!!! (western edge central area perhaps)

I wish the trains travelled along the North London Line stopping at busy stations only and ran to Stratford - or even Barking and / or Stansted Airport! OK, I would still have to change train to catch it but it would be far far far far more useful, bringing direct rail services to many people who avoid the underground because of crowds, steps, etc which when travelling with luggage can make life more difficult.

As an aside, apart from (possibly) a short distance of track where the GW and NL lines meet the whole route is already electrified on the overhead wire system, so it this service could be introduced very easily. Maybe it will happen for the Olympics, if they happen.

Simon
I don't know if any one else remembers but they did run a short lived cross London service via the North London line. In the Mid Nineties it ran from Basingstoke via Staines up the Hounslow loop onto the North London line to Stratford the out to Ipswich stopping at Major stations along the way. It only was useful If I needed to go to North or East London, but it was never very heavily used and and quite slow, plus it was only once an hour. I think the other operators managed to get it cancelled because its pathways could be used by more heavily loaded commuters trains to central London, plus with it cross three seperate networks it could be affected by delays on any one network.

Last edited by Rational Plan; November 27th, 2005 at 11:03 PM.
Rational Plan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 03:00 PM   #93
JDRS
Against ID Cards
 
JDRS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Manchester
Posts: 9,764
Likes (Received): 4

Spsmiler thanks for your post, very interesting read. So will the new trains be similar to the trains on the rest of the network in regard to the seating arrangement with seats along the side?

Tubeman a few more questions:

1) Why on rare occasions do trains run all the way from Aldgate to Chesham instead of Amersham? I've never understood this.

2) You probably don't know this but why recently has the chesham to chalfont and latimer shuttle got alot slower? After about a minute of travelling it slows alot and continues like that for much of the journey?
JDRS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 06:15 PM   #94
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rational Plan
I don't know if any one else remembers but the did run a short lived cross London service via the North London line. In the Mid Nineties it ran from Basingstoke via Staines up the Hounslow loop onto the North London line to Stratford the out to Ipswich stopping at Major stations along the way. It only was useful If I need to go to North or East London, but it was never very heavily used and and quite slow, plus it was only once an hour. I think the other operators managed to get it cancelled because its pathways could be used by more heavily loaded commuters trains to central London, plus with it cross three seperate networks it could be affected by delays on any one network.

Oh yes, i remember it. I sometimes used it - within the London area.

killed by the railway for being too inconvenient to operate (IMHO)


This **should** have been the start of a fantastic Regional cross-London semi-fast service, like the Thameslink (albeit without going through the very centre of London), but...
  • at best it only ran every 2 hours
  • exact times varied - ie: exact 'minutes past the hour' did not folloow a regular clockface pattern
  • trains were often inconveneintly times - especially for rush hour passengers
  • it was far too slow
  • in short, it was operated "under sufferance" - by which I mean that because of its innovative nature it could not be prevented from running - so the people who contril when trains can be run worked the old ruse of using the timetable and journey times to make it unpopular, and therefore fail

Another criticsm is that although brand new the trains were diesels - the route was [virtually] complletely electrified and they should have used electric trains as these would have made much better ecconimic use of the electric wires & rails. The same company which built the class 170 Turbostar trains that the service used also build the Electrostar trains which are used elsewhere in Ssoutheren England, in both overhead wires and 3rd rail forms - although the trains themselves are capable of operating on both systems (subject to fitting of pantographs / 3rd rail power collection shoes).

Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.

Last edited by spsmiler; November 27th, 2005 at 06:31 PM.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 06:44 PM   #95
spsmiler
Registered User
 
spsmiler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 160
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDRS
Spsmiler thanks for your post, very interesting read. So will the new trains be similar to the trains on the rest of the network in regard to the seating arrangement with seats along the side?

Tubeman a few more questions:

1) Why on rare occasions do trains run all the way from Aldgate to Chesham instead of Amersham? I've never understood this.

2) You probably don't know this but why recently has the chesham to chalfont and latimer shuttle got alot slower? After about a minute of travelling it slows alot and continues like that for much of the journey?
Hi, I assume you are asking about the new subsurface trains?

I am not 100% sure if the proposed seating will only have seats along the side, (I think not) but do know for certain that compared to the A stock trains the intention is to offer considerably fewer seats per S stock train than now.

However, for passengers who use the C stock trains )which actually do have seats along the inside edges only) its my understanding that there will be an increase in seating capacity!

Most trains to Chesham only travel as far as Chalfont & Latimer, however on Monday - Friday rush hours there are a couple of through trains to central London, plus the first and last trains of the day also travel beyond the branch. Probably to / from Wembley Park, as thats near to where the depot is. Tubeman might know more - or you can always look at the timetable on the London Undergound or Chiltern Railways websites, as trains on that route ARE timetabled.

As for the slow speed, it sounds like the track or the embankment, etc is in need of (possibly expensive) maintenance. Running trains more slowly is a cheaper option.

Simon
__________________
Citizen Of Planet Earth
Living In The British Isles.
spsmiler no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 11:16 PM   #96
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by JDRS
Spsmiler thanks for your post, very interesting read. So will the new trains be similar to the trains on the rest of the network in regard to the seating arrangement with seats along the side?

Tubeman a few more questions:

1) Why on rare occasions do trains run all the way from Aldgate to Chesham instead of Amersham? I've never understood this.

2) You probably don't know this but why recently has the chesham to chalfont and latimer shuttle got alot slower? After about a minute of travelling it slows alot and continues like that for much of the journey?
1) A couple of peak trains run direct from Chesham to London and vice versa, the rest of the day its a sleepy rural shuttle service dodging sheep and pheasants.

2) Probably a temporary speed restriction due to track or earthwork issues, but another reason could be leaf fall ('leaves on the line'). If it picks up again in a couple of weeks then the latter could be likely. Low rail adhesion hinders braking and acceleration performance and could result in a blanket speed restriction for leaf fall season.
Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 11:19 PM   #97
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rational Plan
The Heathrow Connect service does terminate at Paddington, they just don't advertise it. To protect BAA's investment in the Heathrow express tunnels, Heathrow express remains the only advertised service. Plus you can not buy tickets from Paddington to Heathrow. The trains from Paddington advertise a service to Hayes and Harlington, the last stop before the tunnels and the last station that travelcards are valid. You can only buy tickets to Heathrow once you get to Ealing Broadway. This applies in the opposite direction, so at Heathrow it says 'Ealing Broadway' and you can only buy a ticket to London at Hayes and Harlington.

The service also relieves pressure on the inner suburban stations, as it is the only service where you have a good chance of getting a seat in the rush hour. They had to re juggle the existing time table to fit this service in. The result some longer distance suburban services stop at stations west of the airport junction to compensate for the loss of one stopping service and the also now run longer trains.
That sucks balls. If the trains are going to take up paths into Paddington anyway, they might as well be advertised and have their capacity fully utilised. Lunacy... Private industry and public servcies shouldn't mix because it causes ludicrous situations like this. "Yes sir, the trains do run to Paddington but I'm not allowed to tell you that, oh and you can't buy a ticket anyway."

Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 11:23 PM   #98
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by spsmiler
Tubeman,

re: the Olympia service, thats only since WW2. before then there was a regular electric service between Earls Court and Willesden Junction, using LMS electric trains. But the present arrangement is better, with the west London Line running between Willesden and Clapham junctions. It will be even better when trains run more frequently...

Simon
I was aware of that... But don't forget it was Addison Road Station so technically the Earl's Court to Willesden Junction service never served Kensington Olympia
Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 11:30 PM   #99
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by spsmiler
Central Line?? @34 miles, although maybe a bit less now that the Onger branch no longer exists - although I think that all distances are still calculated from Ongar!

Hopefully Tubeman will know.

Its possible that the longest "sensible" journey might be different - Aldgate to Chesham I would guess, taking about an hour, although nowadays the trains run more slowly than they used to - their maximum speed has beenr educed to 60 mph (from 71 mph) and the fast trains call at Harrow-On-The-Hill.

In the early 1990's some trains would run non-stop between Finchley Road and Moor Park, a journey which took about 19 minutes. Woe betide anyone who did not check the destination information and caught the wrong train - and then saw it running through stations (OK: some without platforms on their tracks) without stopping....

I have some videotape of trains running through Harrow-On-The-Hill non stop. Maybe I should get it digitised and on the Internet! I need a way to convert it into mpeg or avi, my Applel computer already has a video card, but is an old Powermac so only runs OS 9.2.

Simon
Yes all kilometrages (we're metric!) are still measured from Ongar Station

I've always been curious how it 'works' though... obviously the Central Line to West Ruislip or Ealing would be straightforward as theoretically a journey from Ongar was possible, but how do you know how far a station on the District or Jubilee Line (or any other line for that matter) is from Ongar?
Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2005, 11:34 PM   #100
Tubeman
Jubilation
 
Tubeman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London SE15
Posts: 18,973
Likes (Received): 3272

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rational Plan
I don't know if any one else remembers but they did run a short lived cross London service via the North London line. In the Mid Nineties it ran from Basingstoke via Staines up the Hounslow loop onto the North London line to Stratford the out to Ipswich stopping at Major stations along the way. It only was useful If I needed to go to North or East London, but it was never very heavily used and and quite slow, plus it was only once an hour. I think the other operators managed to get it cancelled because its pathways could be used by more heavily loaded commuters trains to central London, plus with it cross three seperate networks it could be affected by delays on any one network.
Yes, it was the first passenger service along the original North & South-Western Junction Railway between South Acton and Brentford for 60 years... It always looked odd on the rail map seeing it as a passenger route.

I remember my shock as a District Line driver crossing the route between Chiswick Park and Acton Town and looking down to see a modern passenger train on what had always been a near-deserted freight route.
Tubeman no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
london, railways, tube

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium