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Old September 8th, 2009, 10:32 PM   #21
mlm
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Anyway, I don't like modernist stuff like this, they built this crap since Bauhaus times. For friggin 80 years. We developed faster and more individual with architectural styles before WW2.

Today it's the same modernist shite everywhere.
You are of course more than entitled to have your own opinion. Maybe it's just me, but I surely don't see this kind of architecture everyday, and for Danish standards I would say it's quite something. The exterior is nothing ground breaking, and specially the front is almost on the edge of being boring - although the textured concrete is quite nice. However, the inside is what makes this building really great in my opinion, with the curved roofs throughout the entire building allowing daylight to lit up the galleries. A roof like that is not something I have seen before, and to me it's an attraction itself.

Don't get me wrong, curved roofs have of course been made before, but atleat here (and to me) it's quite unique.
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Old September 9th, 2009, 05:56 PM   #22
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The exterior is nothing ground breaking, and specially the front is almost on the edge of being boring
You got it. And I could show you at least 30 similar buildings (or almost identical ones) of Germany alone. But I don't feel like doing so, 'cause it'd hurt my eyes.


This ain't in the sense of Mies van der Rohe, Walter Gropius, Frank L. Wright etc.
They always wanted something seminal, innovative, that creates new values.

I like some particular examples of the very first modernist buildings, but most of the things that followed the Bauhaus/Stijl stuff were plain, uninspired copies.

I'm just tired of those copies. They're built since decades. Always the same tedious stuff.


(The interior got some innovation to it, I give you that. And its use is a nice thing, of course. I'm just moaning about the bland exterior.)
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Old September 9th, 2009, 07:15 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by erbse View Post
You got it. And I could show you at least 30 similar buildings (or almost identical ones) of Germany alone. But I don't feel like doing so, 'cause it'd hurt my eyes.


This ain't in the sense of Mies van der Rohe, Walter Gropius, Frank L. Wright etc.
They always wanted something seminal, innovative, that creates new values.

I like some particular examples of the very first modernist buildings, but most of the things that followed the Bauhaus/Stijl stuff were plain, uninspired copies.

I'm just tired of those copies. They're built since decades. Always the same tedious stuff.


(The interior got some innovation to it, I give you that. And its use is a nice thing, of course. I'm just moaning about the bland exterior.)
This isn' true for Mies. He was looking for something universal, with an absolute value that could eventually be reproduced all over the world, for every function (so paradoxally contraddicting functionalism).

However I find that the facade has its power, a kind of discrete and humble monumental sense. Then, being this building by Steven Holl, the interiors and the light effects are perfect as usual. The only thing i dislike are those openings in the outside walls, this is so post-modern...
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Old September 9th, 2009, 07:36 PM   #24
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Postmodernism is great. One of the few recent styles that actually got something innovative to it.
And that brought back human aesthetics and measures. Such a pity it didn't last longer.
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Old September 9th, 2009, 07:37 PM   #25
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Good thing we don't all have the same taste, otherwise the world would be a boring place.

I just got back from the public opening and I haven't changed my mind - we got ourself a great building here imo. Took a bunch of photos, they could be better though but I couldn't use tripod there today (and also too many ppl so had to shoot fast).

Let's start with the entrance area:


And here some from the biggest of the two galleries. It's devided in two sections:




Those things in front of the "windows" can be opened and closed depending on what mood you're going for at a specific exhibition. Today they were closed:




The smaller gallery which is decided in four sections:




This little piece (of .... ) is one of the most famous the museum own. It's by the italian artist Piero Manzoni. When made back in 1961 these cans were sold at the same price as gold. Heart own the worlds largest Manzoni collection which is really the backbone of their collection:


And a few from the outside, first another close up of the facade with it's textile look. Quite brilliant if you ask me, both because the old museum was housed in an old shirt factory and because the area has a big textile history. It was also some of these textile manufactors who really brought the art to Herning:


Two shots of the backside:


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Old December 21st, 2009, 11:55 AM   #26
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http://www.arkitektforeningen.dk/da/...20byggeri.aspx
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