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Old December 16th, 2005, 03:31 PM   #21
mopc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WANCH
South America is a popular destination for Japanese emmigration especially in countries like Brazil and Peru where they had a Japanese president and an incident in the residence of the Japanese ambassador!
Peru had a Japanese president in the 1990, buddy. Immigration to Brazil started in 1908. Brazilīs economic success (1900-1980) attracted not only Japanese but millions of immigrants from all over the world.
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Old December 16th, 2005, 03:34 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mopc
Peru had a Japanese president in the 1990, buddy. Immigration to Brazil started in 1908. Brazilīs economic success (1900-1980) attracted not only Japanese but millions of immigrants from all over the world.
True that Alberto Fujimori became president of Peru during the early 90s but his parents immigrated to Peru back in 1934.
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Old December 16th, 2005, 09:20 PM   #23
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And now he's hiding in Japan from Peruvian authorities because of some alleged illegal activities he committed in Peru. Yet, the Japanese have given him a Japanese passport and I don't even think he was born in Japan. Meanwhile about a million Korean workers in Japan can't get Japanese citizenship even though they came to work in Japan perfectly legally.
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Old December 17th, 2005, 01:22 PM   #24
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this shows that the world has no boundary..............
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Old December 17th, 2005, 10:51 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by satit28
this shows that the world has no boundary..............
HUH??? What are you referring to exactly?
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Old December 17th, 2005, 11:46 PM   #26
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to add a fact.

Did you know a big percentage of bolivian people is of mongolian descent?
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Old December 18th, 2005, 02:35 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick in Atlanta
And now he's hiding in Japan from Peruvian authorities because of some alleged illegal activities he committed in Peru. Yet, the Japanese have given him a Japanese passport and I don't even think he was born in Japan. Meanwhile about a million Korean workers in Japan can't get Japanese citizenship even though they came to work in Japan perfectly legally.
From BBC, Monday, 7 November 2005,

Police in Chile have arrested fugitive Peruvian ex-President Alberto Fujimori just hours after he began a surprise visit to the country.
He is wanted in his home country on corruption and human abuse charges.

Although Peruvian warrants for his detention were thought invalid in Chile, a judge ordered his arrest after Peru lodged an extradition request.

Mr Fujimori, who denies any wrongdoing, said he was visiting Chile as part of a bid to return to Peru and stand for president in 2006.

He was picked up at a Santiago hotel at 0430 GMT and surrendered without resistance, according to authorities.

The Peruvian government is sending a delegation to Chile led by Interior Minister Romulo Pizarro in a bid to speed up Mr Fujimori's extradition.

Correspondents say that the former president's arrival in South America was a surprise for both the Chilean and Peruvian governments.

Mr Fujimori had so far preferred to conduct his unofficial electoral campaign from Japan, where he has been living in self-imposed exile.

He received Japanese citizenship after fleeing Peru in 2000. Tokyo has repeatedly turned down repeated requests from Lima for his extradition.

Presence

Even though Chile and Peru have had an extradition treaty for more than 70 years, it is not clear if arrest warrants issued by Interpol are legally binding on Chile.

Chilean Judge Orlando Alvarez, entrusted with considering Peru's extradition request, ordered Mr Fujimori's arrest and he will be held while the matter is being decided.

The head of Interpol in Chile, Maria Elena Gomez, said earlier the authorities were aware of Mr Fujimori's presence.

"There are several international arrest warrants against Alberto Fujimori, which are not legally valid in Chile."

She said that he was free to leave the country when he wanted.

Mr Fujimori, 67, had said he planned "a temporary stay in Chile as part of a return to Peru to keep a promise with a large part of the people of Peru" to stand again for president next April.

He is banned from holding public office there until 2010.

The BBC's James Painter says that another complicating factor is that Mr Fujimori's arrest comes at a time of worsening relations between Chile and Peru in a dispute over their sea border.

The Chilean government may be reluctant to do Peru any favours, he adds.

Opinion polls

Last week, Mr Fujimori announced in Tokyo the formation of an alliance to strengthen his electoral chances.

On Sunday, several hundred of his supporters, who remember his success in beating hyperinflation and for crushing the Shining Path rebels, staged a demonstration in the Peruvian capital.

Fujimori supporters rallied in Peru at news of the Chile visit

Recent opinion polls suggest he is trailing way behind other candidates.

Correspondents say he may be calculating that a period of detention either in Chile or Peru may remind Peruvians of his presence and allow him to pick up some sympathy by portraying himself as a martyr.

Mr Fujimori - whose parents were originally from Japan - was Peru's president from 1990 to 2000.

The former president has been accused of involvement in the killing of 25 suspected members of the Shining Path guerrilla group by death squads, and also faces corruption charges.

Mr Fujimori denies any wrongdoing and believes he can win the vote. He was recently given a new Peruvian passport.
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Old December 18th, 2005, 07:49 PM   #28
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I have a Korean-Brazilian friend and he told me that the Korean community is also large in that country.
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Old December 19th, 2005, 11:26 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIKERU Z
I have a Korean-Brazilian friend and he told me that the Korean community is also large in that country.
True but a huge number of Koreans are emmigrating around the globe whether it's The Asia Pacific, Europe or The Americas. I won't be surprised if there's a sizable Korean community in Brazil or any Latin American country.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 11:04 AM   #30
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interesting...
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Old December 21st, 2005, 11:10 AM   #31
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Wow never knew that.
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Old December 21st, 2005, 01:12 PM   #32
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A timeline

-1888 Abolition of Slavery in Brazil (Suzuki: 8).

-June 18,1908-First group of Japanese on the Kasato-Maru Line reach Santos, Brazil (Handa:3).

-1914-1918 WWI

-1917-Gaigai Kogyo Kabushuki Kaisha (KKKK, International Development Company) was founded by advise of the Japanese Government (Suzuki: 9).

-1924-United States prohibits immigration (Suzuki: 9).

-1925-1934 Time of largest number of Japanese immigrants arriving in Brazil (Yamanaka:13).

-1928-Japanese colonization in Amazon (Nambei Takushoku Com, Kanebo Com, began to construct colony of Acará (now Tomé-Aįu) (Suzuki: 9).

-1941-1945 WWII Japan's surrender in 1945

-1960- The first group of Japanese immigrants of coal miners arrived in Brazil. The Mitsui Mine Co. sent a mission to Brazil to investigate immigration of its coal miners (Suzuki: 9).

-1973- The last voyage of the ship "Nippon Maru" and the end of Japanese emigration by Sea (Suzuki: 9).

-1980-1991 Brazil's Economic Crisis (Yamanaka: 13).

-1990-Japan revises its Immigration Control Law to allow "anyone with at least one Japanese ancestor within three generations...automatically eligible for a visa" (Takenaka 1997: 14).

-1994-South Americans of Japanese descent and their spouses (the Nikkeijin)...are legally permitted to reside in Japan, with no job restrictions, for up to three years" (Japan Immigration Association 1994e:40-41).
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Old December 21st, 2005, 01:16 PM   #33
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From

http://www.conncoll.edu/academics/de...ry/pbhist.html

Peruvians and Brazilians of Japanese descent (Nikkei Peruvians and Nikkei Brazilians) living in Oizumi are part of a larger group of Nikkei Peruvians and Nikkei Brazilians living throughout Japan. This section will outline the following: (1) Japanese migration to Peru and Brazil beginning in 1899 and 1908 and continuing through the early portion of this century. (2) The return migration of Peruvians and Brazilians of Japanese descent to Japan in the 1990s.

Japanese emigration began in 1868 "in moments of turmoil as the new Meiji government replaced the Tokugawa shogunate" (Gardiner 1975: 23). Having first flocked to the Kingdom of Hawaii and the United States, the Japanese were becoming familiar with eastward emigration by 1899. Thus, when the Japanese government was then "denied the opportunity to send further emigrants to Hawaii and the U.S.," it was eager to look to Peru [and Brazil] as a potential destinations for Japanese (and Okinawan) workers (Takenaka 1997: 15).

The first Japanese settlers arrived on Peruvian shores in 1899 with temporary intentions of making money and returning to Japan. However, the majority stayed in Peru, battled disease and difficulty, but by "the end of 1909, of the total of 6,295 immigrants to Peru, 5, 158 still lived there" (Gardiner 1975: 29). Japanese migration to Peru continued at a steady increase until "1923,when Japanese migration to Peru by contract was abolished" (Gardiner 1975: 33).

The first group of Japanese emigrants arrived on Brazilian shores in 1908 and followed by in a steady stream compatriots up until the middle part of this century. They also were primarily "Japanese farmers escaping impoverished conditions in Japan's rural areas" destined for the promise land of Brazilian coffee plantations (Tsuda in Baxter and Krulfeld:35). In short, their intentions were to travel to Brazil, make money, and return to Japan.

History repeats itself...so they say.... The return migration of Peruvians of Japanese descent was enabled by a number of factors. In the midst of experiencing a powerful economic upsurge, Japan was in desperate need of increasing its manual labor force since Japanese "young people were avoiding so-called '3D' (dirty, difficult, dangerous) jobs" (Oizumi Poketto Gaido: 1996). Thus, in 1990 Japan revised its immigration control law which granted Nikkeijin and their spouses "formal status of residence" in Japan (Selleck 1997: 17).

Under the law, anyone with at least one Japanese ancestor within three generations was automatically eligible for a visa. Second-generation Nikkei were entitled to a 3-year-valid visa and third-generation Nikkei, a one-year-valid visa. The visa was renewable and there were no numerical ceilings on the number of Nikkeijin who could enter" (Takenaka 1997: 15).

The grim economic situation in Peru coupled with the fact that "the average factory job in Japan paid over 10 times the wage for the average white-collar professional job in Peru (Takenaka 1997: 14) made relocating in Japan an economically viable option for Nikkei Peruvians during the early 1990s. Likewise, just shy of a century later, the inverse phenomena has also occurred with Brazilians of Japanese descent. In 1990, the Japanese government also encouraged a return migration of Japanese-Brazilians to work in Japanese factories. Similar to the situation in Peru, the plan was successful because of the "severe economic crisis in Brazil coupled with an abundance of unskilled jobs in a labor-deficient Japanese economy, as well as an increasing wage differential between the two countries" (Tsuda 1998: 319). While the majority of Japanese-Brazilians are considered educated and of the middle class in Brazil, they "still earn five to ten times their Brazilian salaries in Japan as unskilled foreign workers" (ibid).

Thus, it is clear that both Japanese-Peruvians and Japanese-Brazilians have share a similar history of emigration to South America and return emigration to Japan under the revised visa law in 1991.








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Old December 24th, 2005, 04:35 AM   #34
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I didn't knew it
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