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Old February 18th, 2006, 05:58 AM   #281
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raymond3000
Da sales guy told me that the glass tower was cancelled for unspecified reasons by the owner himself and that he has placed the land back on market for acquisition by other intrested buyers. I had walked in the area around South, Ralphs and Sky lofts and I myself saw the sign still there at the norteast corner of the intersection yesterday. I'm hoping that maybe if some intrested buyer buys the property dat we will get something perhaps even more better than the glass tower even though it really would've been an extremely nice tower to have graced the skyline.

How tall was the glass tower supposed to be???
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Old February 18th, 2006, 06:40 AM   #282
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^25 stories, so somewhere the neighborhood of 300 ft.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 09:29 AM   #283
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^25 stories, so somewhere the neighborhood of 300 ft.
Let's just hope the next proposed for this site hits the 50 story mark.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 11:30 AM   #284
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AMEN to that!!!!!! Even if they could push for a 2 building duo dat would be supa dupa hott but I don't know the size of the actual lot or if it could be able to support something like that. While they are at it maybe they can buy the air rights from 11 or LUMA.
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Old February 18th, 2006, 11:33 AM   #285
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^25 stories, so somewhere the neighborhood of 300 ft.
Dats supa dupa hott because EVO is going to be 263 ft high
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Old February 20th, 2006, 09:10 AM   #286
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So do we have the final~final design for Metropolis yet?
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Old February 20th, 2006, 09:33 AM   #287
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Quote:
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Dats supa dupa hott because EVO is going to be 263 ft high
Supa dupa hott?
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 02:08 AM   #288
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I could picture myself walking down 11th or Olympic, streets with brand new buildings in both sides. Theres' going to be like 10 cranes dt by the end of the year.
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 03:47 AM   #289
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I could picture myself walking down 11th or Olympic, streets with brand new buildings in both sides. Theres' going to be like 10 cranes dt by the end of the year.
Soon dude!
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Old February 22nd, 2006, 11:47 PM   #290
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I keep hering about this building boom in LA, but see little construction especially on the westside.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 12:41 AM   #291
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^ That's because most - if not all - of the activity mentioned on this forum is focused on downtown LA. There are currently four cranes operating downtown right now, if you count the crane in City West above the Visconti (or is it the Orsini?). And the majority of the projects mentioned here, at least the bigger ones, have yet to start.
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Old February 24th, 2006, 07:43 AM   #292
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I imagine by July, we'll see at least 4 cranes for LA Live, mabye 3 for Concerto, 1 for Hanover, for Evo, and hopefully the ground would already be chewed up for Fig South (?)
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Old February 25th, 2006, 07:14 AM   #293
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A lot of projects are slated here. A lot I didn't know about. Looooooonng read.

Downtown Is Looking Up, Literally

The Momentum Continues, With 153 Projects Across Downtown

by Chris Coates

If there are questions as to the status or strength of the Downtown Los Angeles development scene, then just look up. For casting a gaze to the sky reveals sights that didn't exist just a few years ago. Now, one sees cranes lifting steel for ground-up projects, and construction workers buzzing on the upper floors of old office buildings that are being transformed into new apartment and condominium complexes. Looking up one even sees the completed shells and roofs of a few new buildings.
Photo by Gary Leonard.

In other words, the Downtown development scene has progressed from hype to action. Thousands of construction workers are toiling on projects ranging from the hole-in-the-ground of L.A. Live to, a few blocks away, Elleven, which will soon be the first new condo complex to open in South Park in decades. In the Historic Core, it seems that every aged edifice is enjoying a multi-million dollar rejuvenation.

As more developers create more housing projects for more residents, so too are there more restaurants and nightlife options, from the Royal Claytons, an American cuisine eatery opening soon in the Industrial District, to Harlem Place, a speakeasy-style bar coming to the Higgins Building. To the north, officials continue to refine the Grand Avenue plan.

In all, Los Angeles Downtown News is tracking 153 projects across the community. While not every one will ultimately make it to market, it's clear that the Downtown development scene has taken on a life of its own. Here is the latest on what's going on, and up, in Downtown.

NEW PROJECTS

These projects were either announced or garnered public interest in the last six months.

711 N. BROADWAY

Chinatown could get one of its first adaptive reuse projects at 711 N. Broadway. Bridge Residential Advisors plans to start construction in the second quarter of this year on the four-story BC Plaza. The office structure, which is largely vacant on its upper floors, will be turned into 42 loft-style units ranging from 575 square feet to 1,400 square feet. The developer has not decided whether to build condos or apartments. The $12 million project at the northwest corner of Ord Street and Broadway is being designed by Berry/Keller Architects, which will rehabilitate the dated façade, busy ground floor commercial storefronts and central courtyard. Completion is scheduled for summer 2007.

717 FLOWER


Developer Richard Meruelo of Meruelo Maddux Properties is working on plans for one of the tallest residential buildings in Downtown. The 40-story condominium project dubbed 717 Flower would feature 214 units adjacent to the future Ralphs supermarket. The $120 million project is expected to break ground in March and rise in the next two years. The development firm's in-house architects are designing the towering residence as an "aquatic metaphor" for the city. Plans call for a dramatic, watery glass curtain wall along the façade, along with a colorful "kelp garden" sculpture. A ground floor seafood eatery called Mari is planned.

BROADSTONE LOS ANGELES

Phoenix-based Broadstone Los Angeles has announced plans to construct a 204-unit ground-up luxury apartment complex on a former parking lot at First Street and Beaudry Avenue in City West. The lot has been fenced off. Units in the five-story structure would range from 500-square-foot studios to 1,500-square-foot, three-bedroom residences. Rents would range from $1,275 to $4,125. The project would also include 6,000 square feet of ground floor retail. Thomas P. Cox is the architect.

CATHEDRAL HIGH SCHOOL


Cathedral High School, adjacent to the planned Cornfield State Park, has launched a $12 million campaign that will create a one-acre, 48,000-square-foot gym and science building for the campus' 600 students. Brother John Montgomery, the school's principal, said the project will wrap in spring 2007. Long Beach-based Kluger Architects is designing the two-story structure, which will allow students of the all-boys Catholic school to participate in 11 sports. The facility will use split-face concrete blocks and a red tile roof to match the other structures on campus, and will feature several labs, including one for computer design, and a gym with weight facilities, team rooms, lockers and a film room. The 1940s gym was torn down to make way for the current project.

CROCKER CLUB


Hollywood-based 55 Endeavors is turning a basement portion of the Spring Arts Tower at 453 S. Spring St. into a bar and lounge. The speakeasy-themed nightspot (patrons will enter through a hidden door) will also make use of a basement vault. It is named after a former tenant of the 1914 building, the Crocker Citizens National Bank. The club is scheduled to open by June.

DIETRICHS


Hollywood-based Sweet Freedom Development is spending $1.5 million to turn a ground floor portion of the Hellman Building at Fourth and Main streets into a 1920s-style speakeasy. Brian Lenzo, principal and CEO of the company, said the 1,300-square-foot establishment will feature live music and a cigar bar. The project is still in the planning stage, with an expected completion by the end of 2006, he said. The bar will be named after the 1920s film star Marlene Dietrich.

E2 LOFTS


RTI Properties and Landmark Communities are converting a two-story brick warehouse at 941 E. Second St. in the Arts District into condominiums. The $13.4 million project will hold 23 for-purchase lofts (including some three-level units) averaging 1,108 square feet and $700,000. The 33,654-square-foot building will feature a rooftop garden and barbecue area, exposed brick and a fitness center. The project is in the design phase, with construction expected to start this fall and wrap by July 2007.

FIG CENTRAL


KB Home backed out of a deal with Lennar Corp. late last year to build two high-rise condo towers on Figueroa between 11th and 12th streets across from Staples Center. KB is now helping to develop the Convention Center hotel that will be the centerpiece of the $2 billion L.A. Live project. Fig Central plans call for a 40-story and a 27-story structure with a total of 700 units; the project would include up to 250,000 square feet of ground floor retail. An early artist's rendering depicts a shopping area to be developed by LNR Property Corp. fronting Figueroa Street, along with mammoth billboards and television screens that would echo the flashy L.A. Live design. A spokesperson for Lennar said the deal is still on the table.

FIGUEROA SOUTH


The South Group will start construction in May on two 34-story luxury condo towers known as Figueroa South. They are the fourth and fifth phases of the South Group's residential community dubbed South, and will create a combined 648 condominiums. The new site is across the street from Staples Center and the future L.A. Live entertainment district. Plans include plazas, paseos, fountains and gardens. Figueroa South's east tower will rise at 624 W. 12th St., with the west building at 1200 S. Figueroa St. Occupancy is expected in 2008. The 119,000-square-foot site was purchased from Anschutz Entertainment Group for $23.5 million.

GLASS TOWER CONDOMINIUMS


Construction could start as soon as this summer on a $60 million ground-up residential tower at 1050 S. Grand Ave. in South Park. Developer Amir Kalantari said entitlements have been granted and final plans are being approved. The project would put 128 condominiums in a 25-story structure, with floor plans ranging from 850 to more than 3,000 square feet. Units would cost from $400,000 to $3 million, he said. Construction is expected to finish by summer 2008. Nadel Architects is designing the project.

L.A. JOB CORPS CENTER


The YWCA's Los Angeles Job Corps Urban Campus is scheduled to break ground in April. Plans by Pasadena-based Onyx Architects call for a 154,000-square-foot, seven-story steel and glass structure that will house an intake center, cafeteria, library, medical and dental centers, housing for 400 and administrative offices. The $49 million project at Olympic Boulevard and Olive Street will also hold an interior courtyard with an amphitheater for community events. Completion is set for December 2007.

LIBERTY GRILL


Construction is underway on a restaurant at 1037 S. Flower St. near Staples Center in South Park. The eatery, which will serve American cuisine, utilizes the front portion of an existing one-story Mission-style building. Behind that, crews are building an 8,000-square-foot addition that will include a kitchen and 200-seat dining room. Abramson Teiger is the architect. The project is being developed by restaurateur Fred Eric, Downtown-based Camacho's and Bernadette Leiweke, wife of Anschutz Entertainment Group President Tim Leiweke. It is expected to open by April.

MURA


Michigan-based Pulte Home Corporation plans to construct a five-story ground-up condominium complex at 629 Traction Ave. in the Arts District. Designs by architects Togawa Smith Residential call for 190 one- to three-bedroom residences, including some two-story units, with floor plans ranging from 662 to 1,801 square feet, said Pulte Vice President of Infill Development Miles Huber. The 235,000-square-foot project will include a fitness center, outdoor fireplace, pool and barbecue area. The project is scheduled to open by spring 2007, Huber said.

ROYAL CLAYTONS


Crews are turning the ground floor of the Toy Factory Lofts at 1801 E. Industrial St. into a restaurant and lounge, said Brian Lenzo, principal and CEO of Hollywood-based Sweet Freedom Development. The 2,416-square-foot lounge will specialize in American fare and spirits, and will also offer a full breakfast and dinner menu. Lenzo said it is scheduled to open late next month.

SB SPRING


Developer Barry Shy plans to turn two Historic Core properties into condominiums. Construction is scheduled to start next month on the conversion of the 650 S. Spring St. and 111 W. Seventh St. buildings into 420 condos in a single project. Shy said units will start at $300,000 and the development will feature a pool, spa and gym. Construction will last about 16 months, he said.

SB TOWER II


Developer Barry Shy is working on final designs and securing permits for a ground-up residential tower on a vacant lot on Main between Sixth and Seventh streets. Plans are still being worked out, but Shy said the 15-story structure would feature 550 units starting at $650,000. Construction could start as soon as July, he said, and last about two years.

YALE TERRACE


A 55-unit low-income apartment complex at Yale and Ord streets in Chinatown broke ground Feb. 7. Designed by Jubany Architecture and Edwin Mohabir and Partners, the project will feature 37 four-bedroom and 18 three-bedroom units around an interior courtyard. Additionally, 10,000 square feet of space is being set aside for social service, educational and after school programs. Advanced Development and Investment is the developer. The project is set to open by October 2007.

RESIDENTIAL


FOR SALE
808 N. SPRING ST.


Plans are still being worked out to convert a Chinatown office building at 808 N. Spring St. into 123 live-work condominiums. Developer Kor Group paid $9.2 million for the 150,000-square-foot structure last March.

810 S. SPRING ST.


Developer National City Towers is seeking permits to turn the 12-story structure at 810 S. Spring St. into 93 for-purchase units, said project manager Shahriar Afshani. Units in the 135,000-square-foot building would average 950 square feet; the project would include four penthouses, a rooftop garden, a hot tub and a recreation room. The estimated cost is $17 million. Santa Monica-based David Gray is the architect. Construction is expected to finish by September 2007, Afshani said.

1010 WILSHIRE


Construction is scheduled to finish late next year on the conversion of the building at 1010 Wilshire Blvd. into 240 for-sale units. The entire 17-story office building had been occupied by SBC, which moved to South Park's SBC Tower last July. Plans by Santa Monica-based Killefer Flammang call for turning 13 stories of the structure into 800- to 1,200-square-foot condominiums; remaining floors will hold parking, a swimming pool, a recreation area and possibly a health club. The developer is Amir L, LLC.

1100 WILSHIRE


The transformation of the top half of the wedge-shaped office tower at Bixel Street and Wilshire Boulevard is scheduled to finish this spring. Plans call for a mix of 228 dual-level (660 to 1,980 square feet) and single-level (700 to 1,200 square feet) condominiums. The 27-story, triangular office tower atop a 15-level, nearly windowless parking garage has been largely vacant since it was constructed in 1987. Forest City Residential, TMG Partners and Hampton Development are collaborating on the project.

ARTISAN ON SECOND


Construction is moving forward on a 118-unit condominium complex on an L-shaped lot at Second and Hewitt streets. One- and two-bedroom units in the four-story Arts District complex will range from 931 square feet to 1,371 square feet. Other amenities include floor-to-ceiling windows, private balconies, a fitness center and spa. Units will start in the $500,000s. Trammell Crow Residential is the developer. Construction is slated to wrap by spring 2007.

AXIS AT UNION STATION


Sales begin next month and construction is expected to finish by April on the first phase of the $34 million, 272-unit condo complex at Alameda Street and Cesar Chavez Avenue near Union Station. Designed by GMP Architects, the five-story structure will include studio, one- and two-bedroom units between 644 and 1,460 square feet starting in the low $400,000s. Amenities include a rooftop pool, hot tub, barbecue area and screening room. A second five-story building is expected to open by this summer next door. The developer is Standard Pacific Homes. The project was previously known as Union Station Village.

BARKER BROTHERS BUILDING


Developer Kor Group is awaiting approvals to convert the former Barker Brothers furniture warehouse in the Arts District into 297 for-purchase units. Specifics still have to be worked out, but plans call for a mix of single-story residences and three-story townhouses. Construction is scheduled to finish by mid-2007.

BISCUIT COMPANY LOFTS


Construction is slated to wrap by November on the conversion of the former National Biscuit Company factory at 673 S. Mateo St. Developer Linear City is turning the 1925, nine-story structure into 104 live-work lofts ranging from 614 to 7,000 square feet. The project will include one-, two-, three- and four-level units. Other touches include hardwood floors, exposed brick, oversized windows and 13- to 30-foot-high ceilings. The project is designed by Santa Monica-based Aleks Istanbullu Architects. Linear City previously developed the Toy Factory Lofts, across the street from the Nabisco project.

BRIDGE LOFTS


Mark Kreisel, who owned the late Al's Bar, is awaiting financing to develop a site at 120 N. Santa Fe Ave. in the Industrial District. His plans for the Bridge Lofts call for turning a small two-story building into eight luxury condominiums. The units would range from 3,408 to 5,147 square feet and each would have a private garage and entrance, 27-foot ceilings, two fireplaces, two bathrooms and a 400-square-foot rooftop deck. Prices would range from $1.2 million to $1.5 million.

BROADWAY EXCHANGE


The opening of the 68-unit residential conversion at 219 W. Seventh St. in the Jewelry District will be in August, said Project Manager Gabriel Frig. Developer Broadway Exchange Building, LLC decided to add a rooftop structure to the penthouse suite, with windows that will be lit at night. That forced the concrete swimming pool to be moved into the basement of the 12-story building, which required a seismic upgrade, Frig said. The rest of the 1911 structure, once the headquarters of the Bank of Italy, is finished and the interior is being assembled. Plans by West Los Angeles-based architect Lucas Rios-Giordano call for open loft-style studios and one-bedroom units.

BROCKMAN BUILDING


Developers Urban Pacific Builders and West Millennium Homes are spending $24 million to convert the 12-story Beaux Arts office building at 530 W. Seventh St. into an 80-unit condominium complex. Mark Tolley of Urban Pacific said sales are expected to start in late March. Prices will begin in the mid-$300,000s for 850-square-foot units, while 2,300-square-foot penthouses featuring private rooftop decks are expected to fetch more than $1 million. Santa Monica-based Donald Barany Architects is handling the Jewelry District redesign, which will include a fitness center, community rooms and barbecues.

CHAPMAN BUILDING


Construction is expected to begin within 60 days on the conversion of the Chapman Building at Eighth Street and Broadway in the Jewelry District. Developer All Pacific Financial plans to turn the property into 168 loft-style condominiums, said company representative Fred Afari. The 760-square-foot units will include top-of-the-line cabinetry, modern kitchens and concrete flooring. Prices will start in the low $300,000s. The 13-story building formerly housed garment businesses, and currently leases ground-floor space to retail tenants. Designs call for restoring the historic marble and columns throughout the building and creating dramatic hallways. A lighting consultant will be called in to illuminate the exterior at night. Architect Wade Killefer is designing the project. Afari said construction would last 16 to 18 months.

CITY FRONT PLACE


Construction is expected to start in June on five levels of condominiums above an existing row of single-level stores at East Washington Boulevard and South Maple Street south of the Fashion District. The plans by Dennis Needleman include 135 one-, two- and three-bedroom units from 880 to 1,800 square feet; they will sell for about $600,000. The 200,000-square-foot building would also feature a barbecue area, fitness center, pool and an adjacent eight-level parking garage with 444 spots. Yung Kao of Alhambra-based Architech Group is the architect. Construction is expected to wrap by November 2007.

CONCERTO


A groundbreaking is expected this month on a 619-unit condominium complex at Figueroa and Ninth streets in South Park. The first phase in Beverly Hills-based developer Sonny Astani's project is a 30-story tower and a seven-story loft building with a total of 348 units. A second phase, scheduled to start in 2008, would add another 30-story tower. Units in the complex, all market rate condominiums, will range from 750 to 2,325 square feet. The project also includes 27,500 square feet of retail, a 2,510-square-foot park and 1,000 parking spaces. In 2004 Astani paid $29 million to purchase the property from Equitable Life Assurance Society.

EASTERN COLUMBIA LOFTS


Construction is scheduled to finish this summer on the $30 million conversion of the 13-story Eastern Columbia Building at 849 S. Broadway. Kor Group is turning the 75-year-old former office structure into 147 condominiums ranging from 750 to 2,750 square feet with 11- to 14-foot ceilings. Prices will start in the low $300,000s, with penthouses selling for around $1 million. Amenities will include a rooftop fitness area, leisure terrace, pool deck and fireplace. The project includes six penthouses ranging from 1,426 to 3,208 square feet, some with outdoor fireplaces and patios. Last June, the developer relit the Art Deco neon clock tower atop the building. The development will have retail space and possibly a restaurant. Kelly Wearstler Interior Design and Killefer Flammang Architects are designing the project.

EL DORADO


Work is moving ahead on developer Downtown Properties' plan to turn the former hotel at 416 S. Spring St. into 65 condominiums. Units in the 109,090-square-foot building will average 1,094 square feet and start at $400,000. Each condo will feature a balcony, while penthouses will have rooftop gardens. Built in 1913, the 12-story structure was originally named the Hotel Stowell after its builder, N.W. Stowell. The hotel catered to wealthy businessmen in the early years but became a single room occupancy hotel in the late 1940s. It has been vacant for several decades. Construction is scheduled to finish by fall 2007.

GRAND LOFTS


Construction has wrapped on 66 condominiums at 330 W. 11th St. Lee Homes and CIM Group spent $15 million turning the 81-year-old South Park building into two-bedroom lofts ranging from 1,151 to 2,325 square feet. Three additional floors were added to the four-story structure, which once housed the UCLA Extension program. Santa Monica-based architecture firm Killefer Flammang handled the designs.

L.A. LOFTS


Los Angeles-based Venice Development is finalizing plans for a ground-up condominium tower at Hope Street and Olympic Boulevard in South Park, said General Manager Sean Marouf. Details are still being put together, but the project by architect Killefer Flammang will include some retail and construction could start as soon as mid-2007, Marouf said. The project was previously called Hope Towers. Venice just completed the transformation of the 116-apartment Packard Lofts.

LIBRARY COURT


Newport Beach-based Greystone Group changed its plans late last year, and now intends to turn the University Club Building at 630 W. Sixth St. into condominiums instead of apartments. Despite the switch, the $20 million conversion will still create 90 one- and two-bedroom units. The building is named for its proximity to the Richard J. Riordan Central Library, and will integrate a glass curtain wall into the existing marble façade. The building's 10,000 square feet of ground-floor retail is already leased to tenants including Wolfgang Puck, Mitaki's Sushi and the Library Bar, and is planned to open in April, according to Walter Eeds of Greystone. Residential sales will commence in May, with an average asking price of $500,000.

MILL STREET LOFTS


Construction is slated to start this spring on developer Linear City's 16-story, 121-condominium project at 673 Mateo St. Units will start at 600 square feet and top out at 2,400 square feet. Pricing for the lofts has not yet been determined. The 132,256-square-foot project will include terraced roof gardens, a swimming pool and a landscaped breezeway that cuts through the building's center. The project is expected to open by April 2008. Behnisch, Behnisch & Partner of Stuttgart, Germany, and Marina del Rey-based Cunningham Group are the architects. The project was previously known as Sky Lofts.

MOLINO STREET LOFTS


Construction is nearly complete on developer Kor Group's artist-in-residence structure at 500-530 Molino St. in the Arts District. All 91 units, which average 1,700 square feet, have been sold in the 1920s warehouse building.

MUSEUM TOWER


The owners of the Museum Tower Apartments have backed off previously announced plans to turn the complex at 225 S. Olive St. into for-purchase units. Last year owner Goldrich and Kest Industries had discussed converting the 20-story structure's 217 units into condominiums as leases expired. The building will remain as rental apartments.

NATIONAL BUILDING


Developer Izek Shomof is converting the 130,000-square-foot National Building at 609 S. Grand Ave. into 99 loft-style condominiums. Shomof closed escrow earlier this year on the 13-story property at Sixth Street and Grand Avenue in the Jewelry District. Plans by architect Mueller Design call for units ranging from 800 to 1,600 square feet. The former office building was largely vacant, aside from three ground-floor restaurants. It marks Shomof's first Downtown project off Spring Street, where his properties include the 120-unit Premiere Towers and the 35-unit City Lofts. The $11 million conversion is scheduled to wrap by fall. The 1926 structure was originally designed by Parkinson Architects and was known as the Edward, Widley & Dixon Building.

NINTH AND FLOWER


Construction is scheduled to start this spring on a ground-up residential tower at Flower and Ninth streets in South Park. Developer Meruelo Maddux Properties, which includes prominent Los Angeles landowner Richard Meruelo, plans to turn the 30,000-square-foot plot it purchased in July into a 37-story structure with 214 loft-style condominiums and 68,000 square feet of ground floor retail.

OLIVE STREET LOFTS


The project by developers CIM Group and the Lee Group has been sold, according to a CIM representative. While the buyer has not been revealed, crews are working on the tower on the southwest corner of 11th and Olive streets. Original plans called for the 17-story building to be turned into 105 for-purchase units, with a construction cost of $35 million.

PAN AMERICAN LOFTS


Construction is proceeding on Long Beach-based Urban Pacific Builders' $18 million, 40-loft conversion of the Irvine Byrne Building at 249 S. Broadway. Santa Monica-based Donald Barany Architects is reworking the 1895 Beaux Arts structure originally designed by Sumner Hunt. Plans call for 800- to 1,400-square-foot units starting in the low $300,000s; the project will contain 10 penthouses, five of which have already been sold, said Urban Pacific's Mark Tolley.

ROOSEVELT BUILDING


Downtown-based Milbank Real Estate Services is proceeding on its conversion of the 15-story Roosevelt Building at 727 W. Seventh St. into 222 condos. Prices will range from $450,000 to more than $1 million, with floor space falling between 800 and 2,500 square feet. Santa Monica architectural firm Killefer Flammang is orchestrating the redesign of the former office building, which will total approximately 380,000 square feet upon its projected completion in March 2007. The site will take advantage of access to the Metro Red Line station in its basement.

ROWAN BUILDING


Work is moving ahead on developer Downtown Properties' conversion of the 13-story Rowan Building at 460 S. Spring St. into 206 condominiums. Units in the 280,000-square-foot edifice will range from the mid-$200,000s to more than $800,000. Some units on the 12th floor and the penthouse will feature skylights, while a number of condos on the second and ground floors will have private patios and balconies. Six loft-style units will occupy the ground floor. The Beaux Art structure will be restored with its original terra cotta façade and marble-clad lobby, hallways and stairways. Originally designed by John Parkinson, one of the city's premier architects, the Rowan was completed in 1911 as a commercial office building. It housed law firms and stock brokerages, but became vacant after numerous financial institutions moved out of the Historic Core.

SAVOY


Escrow closed Jan. 13 on Intracorp Los Angeles' $114 million purchase of the 303-unit Savoy (formerly known as Alexan Savoy) at First and Alameda streets. The condo project had originally been developed as apartments by Trammell Crow. At $376,238 per unit, the deal was one of the priciest ever paid for a Downtown property. Intracorp has developed condos in other urban markets including San Diego, Pasadena and Glendale. The Savoy units surround three courtyards and a pool. Amenities include a sports cafe, library, screening room, fitness center and a business center. Prices start in the $400,000s with two-level units beginning in the $500,000s. Move-ins began this month.

SB LOFTS


Construction is scheduled to wrap by April on the $25 million conversion of the 548 S. Spring St. building into 184 condominiums, said developer Barry Shy. Units in the Historic Core property will range from 600 to 1,200 square feet and start at $300,000. The former office building and high-tech hub will feature a pool, spa and gym.

SB TOWER


Developer Barry Shy is turning the building at 600 S. Spring St. into 220 condominiums. Units in the 19-story structure will range from 900 to 2,000 square feet, he said, and cost between $400,000 and $1.5 million. Construction is scheduled to wrap by late 2007.

SKY


Move-ins begin in March for a 132-condominium project at 801 S. Grand Ave. in South Park. Lee Homes and CIM Group turned floors 12 through 22 in the Class A office building into one- and two-bedroom live-work units averaging 1,400 square feet. A new residential entrance has been created on the building's west side and amenities include a theater and fitness center. Lower floors will remain offices. Santa Monica-based Van Tilburg, Banvard, and Soderbergh was the architect.

SOUTH/ELLEVEN


Construction is scheduled to finish by April on a $65 million condominium tower at 11th Street and Grand Avenue. The 13-story, 400,000-square-foot project includes 176 units ranging from 850 to 2,800 square feet. Prices will start at $300,000, with some units going for more than $1 million. It is the first of developer South Group's three condominium towers being constructed on a single block in South Park.

SOUTH/LUMA


Work is proceeding on developer South Group's 236-unit, 19-story condominium tower in South Park. The 475,000-square-foot structure at Eleventh and Hope streets will include one- and two-bedroom lofts, penthouses and townhouses ranging from 750 to 3,500 square feet. Prices start in the $400,000s. The $80 million development will also feature ground floor retail and four levels of subterranean parking. The project, the second in South Group's three-tower complex, is slated for completion in spring 2007.

SOUTH/EVO


Crews are in the excavation phase for a $160 million, 23-story complex at 12th Street and Grand Avenue in South Park. The 720,000-square-foot development will offer 311 loft-style condominiums including two-story townhouses that will be accessible from the street, as well as five levels of parking. Units will average 1,100 square feet. It is the third and final phase of developer South Group's condominium project. Evo will share almost the entire block with the first two phases, Elleven and Luma. It is scheduled to finish by spring 2008.

TERAMACHI SENIOR HOUSING


The roof is complete and crews will soon begin to install drywall and stucco on a 127-condominium senior housing complex at San Pedro and Third streets in Little Tokyo, said developer Thomas Wong. Units in the $35 million development will range from 775 to 2,100 square feet. Amenities include a swimming pool, spa, exercise room and courtyard gardens. The six-story, 150,000-square-foot structure will contain three retail tenants on the ground floor and one level of subterranean parking. Some tenants will be from the nearby Senshin Buddhist Temple. Wong said crews are also working on plumbing and electrical systems. He hopes for a December completion. Santa Monica-based Van Tilburg, Banvard, and Soderbergh is the architect.

ZEN


Kawada Company of America is in the entitlement phase for a 330-condominium tower called Zen on a parking lot at Third and Hills streets, said developer Nat Kawada. Units in the 50-story, Asian-inspired tower would average 1,040 square feet, with four penthouses from 2,200 to 2,870 square feet. Pricing has not been determined, Kawada said. The project would include a 704-car parking garage and would be topped with a two-story, 50,000-square-foot fitness center with an indoor pool and a Zen garden. About 10,000 square feet has been set aside for retail and a sports-themed eatery. Plans call for opening the development by 2008.

RESIDENTIAL


FOR RE
308 E. NINTH ST.


Architect David Gray is seeking permits to turn a five-story, 73,000-square-foot warehouse at Ninth and Santee streets into 38 apartments. Units would average 1,129 square feet, Gray said, and the project would feature eight rooftop penthouses and a rooftop garden. It is expected to open by June 2007.

717 OLYMPIC


Crews broke ground in November on a ground-up residential tower at Olympic Boulevard and Figueroa Street in South Park. Plans by Houston-based the Hanover Company call for a 28-story tower with 156 one- and two-bedroom market-rate apartments averaging 1,061 square feet. RTKL Architects is designing the project. Construction is scheduled to finish in late 2007.

BIXEL STREET LOFTS


According to the most recent information available, developer Brad Gluckstein plans to build a five-story apartment complex with 80 units on a parking lot at Fifth and Bixel streets in City West. Designed by Santa Monica-based Aleks Istanbullu Architects, the 76,000-square-foot building would include five townhouses, nine lofts, 13 studios and 28 one- and 25 two-bedroom units. The apartments would range from 550 to 1,400 square feet. Construction has not started, but the project previously had a June 2007 completion date.

BROADWAY PLAZA LOFTS


Plans to convert the former Blackstone department store at 901 S. Broadway into 82 loft-style apartments have stalled, said Wolfgang Kupka, president of developer Vista Affordable Housing Corporation. Designs called for turning the 89-year-old building into 400- to 1,300-square-foot units. The project, which was to include ground floor retail, is about 55% complete, but has been on hold since contractor Fassberg Construction Company declared bankruptcy last April, Kupka said. The Los Angeles Conservancy awarded the developer $100,000 to rehabilitate the building; the funds have since been declined due to construction delays, Kupka said.

CORONITA


West Los Angeles-based Meta Housing is in the pre-construction phase for a multifamily affordable housing complex at 204 Lucas Ave. near Crown Hill. The $6 million, 23,000-square-foot project will include 21 one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments. The four-floor building, just north of Meta's Emerald Terrace development, is expected to wrap by July 2007.

COULTER AND MANDELL BUILDINGS


According to the most recent information available, developer George Peykar intends to turn the 137,000-square-foot Coulter and Mandell Buildings at 500-518 W. Seventh St. into 55 live-work lofts and 28,000 square feet of ground floor retail. Peykar purchased the 88-year-old Jewelry District properties in 2003 for $8 million.

ECO-VILLE


Efforts to build 40 live-work spaces on a 2.5-acre plot at Main and Llewellyn streets east of the Cornfield have apparently stalled. Spearheaded by Jennifer Siegal's Office of Mobile Design, the residential units, intended for artists, were to be fashioned out of prefabricated and converted shipping containers, stacked and arranged in an S-pattern, with roof gardens and communal areas. Siegal said there is no additional information on the development. She had previously said the developer was working to secure funding.

EMERALD TERRACE


Construction is scheduled to finish by December on a $22 million, four-story complex at Lucas Avenue and Emerald Street on Crown Hill. The 98,000-square-foot project will feature 85 affordable housing units from 700 to 1,000 square feet. The developers are Meta Housing and Century Housing of Culver City. Meta is also behind the Northwest Gateway apartment complex on the corner of Second Street and Glendale Boulevard.

FOURTH STREET LOFTS


Crews are framing the second and third floors of a 10-unit market-rate apartment complex in City West, said Andrew Gross, a project manager for developer Thomas Safran Associates. The 8,000-square-foot building, on Fourth Street between Bixel Street and Lucas Avenue, will feature one-bedroom units from 800 to 1,000 square feet. Rent will top out at $2,000. It is scheduled to open by August, Gross said. Last year the developer debuted Skyline Village, an affordable housing complex in the same neighborhood.

HARTFORD PROJECT


Changes in plans and increased construction costs have delayed the $16.5 million affordable housing complex at 440 Hartford Ave., near San Lucas and Fourth streets just west of Downtown, said Dora Leong Gallo, CEO of nonprofit A Community of Friends. Designed by architect Killefer Flammang, the 54-unit project will contain mostly three- and four-bedroom units, as well as a Boys & Girls Club to serve the students of an elementary school being built next door. Gallo said the developer is waiting for funding approval before construction begins, which could happen by July.

HIKARI


Construction is expected to finish by July on a six-story ground-up apartment complex at Second Street and Central Avenue in Little Tokyo, said Gino Canori, project manager for developer the Related Cos. The $38.7 million project includes five stories of residential over 12,500 square feet of ground-floor retail. Studio, one- and two-bedroom units will range from 400 to 1,100 square feet. About 26 units will be priced as low-income housing and the effort will include a fitness center, pool and spa. The 108,000-square-foot project, a joint venture between Related and San Francisco-based MacFarlane Partners, will also feature an illuminated public art installation by Venice-based Susan Narduli.

JUDSON C. RIVES BUILDING


Interior demolition is underway on the nearly century-old Judson C. Rives Building at 424 S. Broadway. Architect David Gray is spearheading the transformation of the 10-story, 74,000-square-foot edifice into 60 apartments averaging 800 square feet. Plans call for a rooftop deck and spa and ground floor retail. Gray is hoping for completion in spring 2007, around the 100th anniversary of the building's opening.

LOFTS AT THE SECURITY BUILDING


Construction finished Feb. 17 on the $28 million conversion of the Security Building at 510 S. Spring St. into 154 apartments, said Bernie Sandalow, a spokesman for developer Simpson Housing Solutions. The 12-story project features eight floor plans from 611 to 1,160 square feet; rents are $1,300-$4,200, and 20% of the units are priced as affordable housing. An art gallery, eatery and 6,000-square-foot retail space are on the ground floor.

LORENZO


Construction is scheduled to start in September on a 600-unit luxury apartment complex on Sixth Street between Bixel and St. Paul streets in City West, said Peter Novak, executive vice president for developer GH Palmer Associates. He said the specifics of the units are still being worked out, although the project is expected to finish by summer 2007, Novak said.

MAIN STREET LOFTS


Move-ins will occur soon following the transformation of the 1905 building at 620 S. Main St. in the Historic Core. Developer Oxford Street Properties has spent $8 million renovating the 75,060-square-foot building into 40 light-filled, industrial-style lofts. The units average 1,250 square feet and have 11- to 15-foot ceilings. Amenities include bamboo plank flooring and stainless steel kitchen appliances.

MERCANTILE ARCADE BUILDING


Construction is scheduled to finish this fall on the $15 million residential conversion of the Arcade Building at 541 S. Spring St. Developer Fifth Street Funding is turning the 12-story Beaux Arts-style structure, also known as the Broadway-Spring Arcade, into 143 market-rate lofts. The units are being finished with hardwood floors, granite countertops and high-end stainless steel appliances. Each of the building's two towers, which are separated by an interior retail arcade that stretches from Spring Street to Broadway, will house six apartments per floor - five one-bedrooms and a two-bedroom. Architects David Denton and Killefer Flammang designed the project.

NORTHWEST GATEWAY


Grading is underway on a $55 million mixed-income housing complex on a former train yard at Second Street and Glendale Boulevard. A partnership between Meta Housing and Essex Property Trust, the project will include 276 studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments between 527 and 1,820 square feet. The five-story building will also hold a computer lab, pool, spa, dog park, fitness center and two levels of underground parking. The property contains the Belmont Tunnel, which runs beneath Bunker Hill. Last year, the city's Cultural Heritage Commission designated the tunnel a Historic Cultural Monument. Meta Housing said it would keep the tunnel intact, although it will not be open to the public. Completion is scheduled for early 2008.

ORSINI II


Construction is underway on a ground-up apartment complex at 505 N. Figueroa St. Developer GH Palmer Associates' plans call for 600 luxury apartments with rents ranging from $1,250 for studios to $1,725 for two-bedroom units. The project is part of the three-phase Orsini at Sunset Boulevard and Figueroa Street. It is scheduled for a May 2007 opening.

PACIFIC EXCHANGE BUILDING


Delson Investment Company's multistage, three-tower adaptive reuse and ground-up residential project in City West remains in the planning stage, according to Delson head Michael Delijani. Phase one involves converting the 10-story Pacific Exchange Building at Third Street and Beaudry Avenue, which Delson acquired in the late 1990s, followed by constructing a pair of 30-story towers. If the project is completed, it would boast 850 condominiums and apartments. West Los Angeles-based Nadel Architects will design the three structures, which will cut into the Pacific Exchange Building's eight levels of parking.

RESERVE


City inspections are being conducted and the final touches are taking place on a 78-unit residential conversion at Olympic Boulevard and Olive Street in South Park. Developer Maz Gilardian spent $13 million to convert the nine-story Federal Reserve Bank building. The units are all true lofts with an upper level and 17-foot high ceilings. They range from 1,000-5,000 square feet and the average rent will be $2,000. There are also plans for a restaurant and bar on the ground floor of the 85-year-old structure. About 25% of the lofts have been leased and will be ready for occupancy after a two-week plan check, Gilardian said.

ROSSLYN LOFTS


Rob Frontiera and his brother Joseph are conducting a $12 million renovation of the 1913 Frontier Hotel into 130 units known as the Rosslyn Lofts. For years the project at Fifth and Spring streets was a rundown, very low-income hotel, but after a 10-page city injunction three years ago, the brothers have begun a transformation of the 12-story structure. They are fixing up two floors at a time and rents in the apartments will be about $1.50 per square foot. The loft-style residences include polished concrete floors and original, restored mahogany moldings. Three art galleries are occupying ground-floor space.

SANTA FE YARDS


Last fall developers Polis Builders and McGregor Company said they were negotiating with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to lease land that currently houses a train storage and maintenance facility on Santa Fe Avenue and Second Street. The developers have presented a plan to develop a $65 million, 400-unit apartment complex. The 2.7-acre site, dubbed the Santa Fe Yards, is bounded roughly by Santa Fe Avenue on the west, the First and Fourth Street bridges on the north and south, and by freight and Metrolink service tracks adjacent to the Los Angeles River on the east. The complex would include a mix of one- and two-bedroom apartments and lofts, with rents fetching about $2 a square foot; they would be geared to students. About 10,000 to 20,000 square feet of ground-floor retail could include a cafe and other neighborhood-serving amenities. Also planned are 700 parking spaces, 200 of which would replace MTA spots. Early designs by Michael Maltzan Architects reveal a long, raised rectangular structure with an underpass that opens the project to pedestrian activity. The developers have said they hope to break ground by summer.

SIXTH STREET LOFTS


Construction is scheduled to finish by July on a half-ground-up, half-adaptive reuse project in the Industrial District. Developer Howard Klein is creating 63 live-work units and at least two retail spaces by converting a row of warehouses at 1309-1333 E. Sixth St. and building three new structures nearby. Units in the complex will range from 600 to 1,580 square feet with rents from $1,200 to $3,000. The project was designed by Seattle-based Tony Bell Architecture.

THE FLATS LA


MKT Community Development has begun leasing units in its conversion of 205 former Holiday Inn rooms at 750 Garland Ave. About 85% of the new studio apartments in the 1960s City West structure will be priced at $1,200 a month, though some will cost up to $2,000. The developer is considering providing such hotel-like amenities as room service and a salon. The project will also contain a 6,000-square-foot ground-floor restaurant.

THE UNION


Construction is moving ahead on the $17 million conversion of 760 S. Hill St. in the Jewelry District. Designs by Santa Monica-based Killefer Flammang Architects call for 91-loft-style apartments from 700 to 1,900 square feet. Meruelo Maddux Properties acquired the 12-story structure for $12 million last year from Heisman Company. The brick and terra cotta building was once the headquarters of Union Bank and Trust Company. Construction is scheduled to finish by early 2007.

TITLE GUARANTEE BUILDING


Construction is slated to wrap by December on the $25 million conversion of the Title Guarantee Building at 411 W. Fifth St., said developer Daniel Swartz. Plans by architecture firm Killefer Flammang call for 74 loft-style apartments starting at 900 square feet. Ceilings will be exposed concrete and range from 10 to 14 feet. Swartz, who purchased the 12-story structure in 1983 for $9 million, bought out his investors' interest in the property. Original architects John and David Parkinson modeled the 1930 Art Deco- and Gothic-inspired edifice after the Tribune Tower in Chicago. The structure, the former home of Spanish language newspaper La Opinión, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

TUSCANY


Crews this month are installing interior drywall and other final touches on a five-story, $40 million student apartment complex near USC in the Figueroa Corridor. The project at 3760 S. Figueroa St. is about 80% complete, and construction is expected to wrap by May, said Alan Smolinisky, a principal with developer Conquest Student Housing. Crews have finished framing and have installed all insulation, plumbing, windows and the building's roof. The 300,000-square-foot structure will house 512 students in one- to four-bedroom apartments. Rent will be $600 per student. Amenities will include steam rooms, saunas, tanning beds, satellite television, a gym, sundeck, study lounge, dry cleaning, and maid and tutoring services. Conquest has secured leases for the project's 15,000 square feet of retail space from Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, Coldstone Creamery, Quiznos Subs, Pick Up Stix and Robek's. Conquest owns 18 apartment buildings around USC.

UNION POINT


West Los Angeles-based developer Meta Housing plans to build a $7 million ground-up affordable housing complex at 420 Union Drive in City West. The five-story structure will house two- and three-bedroom units between 800 and 1,050 square feet. It will include on-site laundry, a community room, computer lab and a barbecue/picnic area. Plans call for construction to wrap by June 2007.

UNIVERSITY GATEWAY


Construction is expected to start this summer on an eight-story ground-up complex on a former car dealership at Figueroa Street and Jefferson Boulevard near USC. Downtown-based Urban Partners is spearheading the $135 million mixed-use project with 421 units for 1,656 USC students. The 923,316-square-foot building will have 83,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space and 1,210 parking spots. It will also hold a bookstore, coffee shop, fitness center and storage for 817 bicycles. USC alumni Glenn Togawa and Timothy Smith of Pasadena-based Togawa Smith Martin Residential are designing the project. Urban Partners principal Dan Rosenfeld said construction is expected to wrap by fall 2008.

VERMONT SENIOR HOUSING


Construction is scheduled to finish by next January on a four-story senior housing facility at 39th Street and Exposition Boulevard. The project by Century City-based developer Century Housing Corporation will create 140 mostly one-bedroom units. The development, for seniors over 62, includes ground-floor parking and common areas. The project is partly funded by a 2002 Department of Housing and Urban Development grant.

VILLA VERONA


Construction is scheduled to finish by June on a ground-up loft project at Wilshire Boulevard and Bixel Street in City West. The 250,000-square-foot building includes 234 lofts, 10,000 square feet of retail, 450 parking spots and 35 workforce apartments. Beverly Hills-based Sonny Astani is the developer.

VISCONTI


Work is scheduled to finish by June on a $45 million, 297-unit luxury apartment complex at Bixel and Third streets in City West. Developer GH Palmer Associates has agreed to pay $2.8 million to the city; this will exempt the firm from including low-income units in the Visconti, and allow them to convert 60 low-income units in another Downtown project, the Medici, into market-rate apartments.

WILSHIRE COURT


Construction is moving ahead on a ground-up apartment complex by Washington-based Holland Partners. The first phase is a five-story structure with 93 units at Bixel and Ingraham streets in City West. The second portion is a 180-unit, four-story structure just north, at Bixel Street and Wilshire Boulevard. Units in both buildings, which will be linked via a pedestrian bridge, will have two and three bedrooms and average 800 square feet. Development Associate Luna Hu said the first phase is slated to open early next year, with the second finishing in May 2007.

WOOD APARTMENTS


Construction began in January on a 61-unit affordable housing project in City West. 1010 Development Corp., the development arm of First United Methodist Church, is building the $20.5 million project on two lots on opposite sides of the street; one at 1322 and the other at 1405 James M. Wood Boulevard. The project, designed by Pasadena-based Ken Kurose Architects, includes 40 two-bedroom units, 21 three-bedroom units, 1,340 square feet of office space, a 1,740-square-foot community room and a childcare center for 30 preschool students. It is named for late CRA and labor leader James M. Wood.

MIXED USE


BLOCK 8/LITTLE TOKYO


Developer Related Cos. plans to break ground next summer on a $250 million market-rate housing community on land known as Block 8, a parking lot at Second, Third, Los Angeles and San Pedro streets. The four-structure project will ultimately include 750 condos and apartments, retail and a 600-space public parking garage. The first phase, a 22-story tower, will rise on the southwest corner of Second and San Pedro streets; it will include 240 condos alongside the garage. There will be three additional six-story structures: one will house 95 condos on the southeast corner of Second and Los Angeles, across from the new Little Tokyo Library; the second will be sited mid-block along Los Angeles Street between Second and Third with 175 condos; and the third will include 240 apartments on San Pedro. The condos will start at $337,000, and will average $570,400 for tower units and $478,000 for smaller residences. Apartment rents are projected to range from $1,295 for studios to $1,870 for a two-bedroom unit. On the southern half of the site, a 12,672-square-foot park will include landscaping, fountains, public art and pathways. Thomas P. Cox Architects is designing the project.

BLOSSOM PLAZA


No groundbreaking has been announced, but according to the most recent information available, Blossom Plaza could connect with another mixed-use development at the Capitol Milling Building. The project, on the site of the former Little Joe's restaurant (it closed in 1998), is comprised of six contiguous lots at 900-924 N. Broadway, 215-219 College St. and 901 N. Spring St. Developer Larry Bond, who heads Bond Companies, has said the housing element will be compatible with Chinatown's design; the plan is based on design principles found both in historic Chinese city planning and the 1938 plan for New Chinatown of Los Angeles. Once it begins, construction is expected to last about two years.

CAPITOL MILLING BUILDING


Plans are still in place to create a mixed-use development in the Capitol Milling Company building, a 60,000-square-foot structure at 1231 N. Spring St. Steve Riboli of S&R Partners has said the building could be turned into 40 apartments with 25,000 square feet of retail. Riboli is working with Larry Bond, who is developing the nearby mixed-use Blossom Plaza, on creating a public space to fuse the two sites. The structure is a former grain mill and silo. The plans are part of the large-scale Riverview Project at the Cornfield, a mixed-use development on a triangular piece of land stretching from College Street to the Los Angeles River. The four-phase project would use the Capitol Milling Building as a southern anchor and include up to 300 residential units in four four-story ground-up structures, said John Deenihan, a principal with Downtown-based Rothenberg Sawasy Architects, who is designing the project. Construction is not scheduled to start until 2007 at the soonest. The Riboli family also owns the San Antonio Winery north of Chinatown.

GRAND AVENUE PLAN


A master plan to develop Grand Avenue and First Street between Hope and Hill streets into a $1.8 billion, 3.8-million-square-foot mixed-use complex was approved last year by city and county officials. Plans call for 400,000 square feet of retail, a 225-room boutique hotel, 2,600 residential units and a nine-acre retail and cultural promenade. Architect Frank Gehry has signed on to design a 50-story tower at Grand Avenue and Second Street. Related Companies is the developer. A series of public meetings are scheduled for this spring, with construction to start by December.

HERALD EXAMINER


Developer Urban Partners has tweaked its plans to turn the former home of the Herald Examiner afternoon newspaper into a mixed-use complex. Project Coordinator Cwennen Corral said plans to transform portions of the historic building at 11th and Broadway into residences have been dropped. Now, the edifice will include 29,000 square feet of office space and 39,725 square feet of retail. Plans are also in the works to build two ground-up condominium buildings nearby: a 33-story, 330-unit tower at 120 W. 12th St. and a 24-level, 260-unit structure at 1108 S. Hill St. Preservation architect Brenda Levin will oversee the rehab of the historic building; ground-up elements will be designed by Thom Mayne. Corral said the project is still in the planning stage, although officials hope to break ground by December. Construction would last about 18 months, she said.

HOMEBOY INDUSTRIES


A groundbreaking is scheduled for early next month on the new headquarters of Homeboy Industries, a pioneering gang prevention program founded by Father Gregory Boyle. The 20,000-square-foot building at Alameda and Bruno streets in Chinatown will house the nonprofit's bakery and the 3,000-square-foot Homegirl Café and Catering. Homeboy is currently based in Boyle Heights. The project is scheduled for a fall 2006 completion, Boyle said.

MEDALLION


Plans to build a 320,000-square-foot complex at Fourth and Main streets have been approved by the Community Redevelopment Agency. Other city approvals are still several months away for developers Saeed Farkhondehpour and Morad Neman. Plans call for the $125 million Medallion to include 360 condominiums and 200,000 square feet of retail in two 11-story towers. One tower would rise on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main and the other at Third and Main. The units would include singles and one-bedrooms and average around 760 square feet. The complex would also have three commercial structures, a two-acre courtyard and park, a swimming pool and an indoor gym. M2A Architects and Leo A Daly are handling the designs.

METROPOLIS


After 14 years of stops, starts and plan changes, the Community Redevelopment Agency in October approved the master plan for the $800 million Metropolis project in South Park. Los Angeles-based City Centre Development could break ground this summer on the 6.5-acre mixed-use complex that will unfold in four phases, the first of which will include a 30-story building with 360 condos and 17,867 square feet of retail. Phase two calls for a 46-story structure with 388 condos and 17,133 square feet of retail. The third phase envisions 88 condos in a 55-story hotel/residential tower with 480 rooms. The final element is a 42-story office tower with 11,000 square feet of retail. A large-scale public art project would also be included. When first proposed in 1991, Metropolis was an all-office and retail development, but was sidetracked when the office market stagnated. The original project had retail below grade, but now it has an open plaza, outdoor seating and a park. Gruen Associates is designing the project on a collection of surface parking lots between the 110 Freeway, Francisco Street, James M. Wood Boulevard and Eighth Street. IDS Real Estate Group is partnering on the deal.

SANTEE VILLAGE


Move-in is scheduled for March in the latest phase of Santa Monica-based MJW Investments' $130 million conversion of nine Fashion District garment factories. The Textile Building at 315 E. Eighth St. includes 64 live-works from 650 to 1,575 square feet, with prices starting in the low $300,000s. The building also includes 5,000 square feet of ground floor retail. Another portion of the project started in October and will transform three buildings - the Eckardt, Cornell and Santee - into 216 condominiums and 10 retail spots by summer 2007. Eventually, the development will include 780,000 square feet and 445 units on the block bounded by Los Angeles, Seventh and Eighth streets and Maple Avenue. A 165-apartment first phase opened in May 2004.

SOUTH VILLAGE/RALPHS


A sales office is expected to open next month for Market Lofts, the condominium component of South Village, a $220 million mixed-use development on a 7.2-acre plot bounded by Eighth, Ninth, Flower and Hope streets. The six-story project includes one of Downtown's most desired entities, a 50,000-square-foot Ralphs grocery store which, according to John Given of CIM Group, is expected to open by early 2008. The 267 condominiums will range from 650 to 1,450 square feet and the project will feature an outdoor courtyard, pool and spa. It is expected to open by early 2007. The first phase of South Village, the 251-unit Gas Company Lofts at 800, 810 and 820 S. Flower St., opened in 2004. Additional phases of the development, including housing and retail, are planned for adjacent sites. Lee Homes is the project's housing developer, while CIM Group is overseeing the financing and development of 10,000 square feet of retail along Ninth Street.

CIVIC


CIVIC CENTER FIRE STATION NO. 4


Construction started Jan. 19 on a two-story fire and paramedic station at First and Alameda streets. The 40,000-square-foot station will include two bays and a hose tower. It replaces an aged 11,000-square-foot facility at 800 N. Main St. and will be staffed by 14 firefighters serving Little Tokyo, Chinatown and Olvera Street. The project, designed by GKK Dommer and Fluor/HOK, is slated for a November 2007 finish. It will be connected to an emergency operations center at 500 E. Temple St., which is also under construction. That 82,000-square-foot structure, which will also house police operations and fire dispatch centers, replaces emergency communication facilities in City Hall East.

CORNFIELD STATE PARK


A $2 million art project in which Annenberg Foundation trustee and artist Lauren Bon planted corn on much of the property near Chinatown ended late last year. It left in place permanent infrastructure such as a one-mile track, about five acres of green turf, an irrigation system and some lighting; these elements are the base for an interim 12-acre park that will be up and running by this spring, according to state of California officials. It will take about six more years to secure funds for the permanent 32-acre park. The cost of building a visitors' center, permanent restrooms, historical displays and other amenities has been estimated at up to $30 million, though state park officials say that number is inflated. The department spent $30 million to acquire the 32-acre site in 2001. The former freight yard is considered a centerpiece in the effort to revive the Los Angeles River.

EXPOSITION LIGHT RAIL


Construction is scheduled to start this summer on a $640 million light rail line that will run from the Metro Center at Seventh and Flower streets south through Exposition Park, then head west to Venice and Robertson boulevards in Culver City. Rick Thorpe, the MTA's chief executive officer of project management, said crews would relocate utilities before construction starts on the line's underground portion at Flower Street and Exposition Boulevard. The project is scheduled for completion by 2010, he said. A second phase would extend the line to Santa Monica.

FEDERAL BUILDING


Bids will be awarded in several phases for the $90 million upgrade of the Federal Building at 300 N. Los Angeles St. in the Civic Center, said Mary Filippini, a spokeswoman for the General Services Administration. The improvements include new fire safety systems, ceilings, energy-efficient lighting, signage, security systems, elevators and the removal of hazardous materials. All of the work will be completed while the building is occupied, so the more than 8,000 employees of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Attorneys and U.S. Bankruptcy Court will not have to leave. Construction will take up to four years.

FEDERAL COURTHOUSE


Designs are being redrawn for the second phase of a 1 million-square-foot courthouse at First Street and Broadway in the Civic Center. The building will hold 41 courtrooms, 40 judges' chambers and office space for federal agencies. However, increased construction costs are spurring a new plan for the exterior curtain wall. The 3.6-acre site was purchased from the state of California for $2.5 million. The project next to City Hall is budgeted at $314 million and, once it begins, would last five years.

GOLD LINE EASTSIDE EXTENSION


Crews are using massive boring machines to dig two tunnels that will stretch from Union Station to Pomona/Atlantic in East L.A. The six-mile, $899 million extension of the Metro Gold Line will include eight stations. The project also involves replacing on- and off-ramps at Hewitt and Vignes streets and the construction of a bridge over the 101 Freeway to carry the light rail. The line is scheduled for completion in December 2009, said Rick Thorpe, the MTA's CEO of project management. Transit officials estimate it could carry as many as 23,000 daily riders.

HALL OF JUSTICE


The building has been cleaned and demo drawings have been prepared, but restoration work is still at least three years away on the earthquake-damaged Hall of Justice at Temple and Spring streets in the Civic Center. Plans call for spending more than $125 million on fixes and safety upgrades. John Edmisten, a division chief in the county's Chief Administrative Office, estimated planning would take about a year and construction would last at least another year. The Board of Supervisors decided to break up the approval and construction process over a three-year period. Supervisors must approve each phase of construction separately.

LOS ANGELES RIVER


The second round of community workshops, which invite residents to help draft a master plan for renewing the Los Angeles River, kicked off late last month. In September, city officials began an 18-month process to craft a vision for the comeback of the maligned waterway over the next 20 years. Downtown is one of five hubs that will be targeted for intensive redevelopment. Locally, efforts will focus on a 250-foot swath on the riverbank near the Cornfield State Park. The $3 million master plan, which is being funded by the Department of Water and Power, will address issues such as neighborhood improvement, protecting wildlife, the environmental health of the river and leveraging economic development. Nearly 80% of the 52-mile expanse is trapped in concrete. Public workshops are held once a month.

POLICE HEADQUARTERS


Construction is scheduled to start this summer on the $303 million, 11-story new headquarters of the Los Angeles Police Department at First and Spring streets. The 500,000-square-foot structure will include police administration and investigative operations, large assembly areas including a Police Commission hearing room, a conference center, a Compstat Command Center, a 200-seat cafe and a 450-seat auditorium on Main Street. A six-story (four above ground, two below), 500-space parking garage and a police carwash and gas station for about 1,200 vehicles is also part of the complex. After protests from the community, the Police Commission last year voted to include a 130-by-200-foot stretch of grass and trees fronting Second Street, as well as an expanded outdoor plaza on First Street. The new building will replace the earthquake-damaged Parker Center a block north. DMJM is the architect. Construction is scheduled to finish by June 2008.

TAYLOR YARD


Construction is scheduled to wrap this summer on a 40-acre state recreation facility on the former Union Pacific Railroad yard in Cypress Park. The $34 million project will include green spaces, hiking trails and wildlife habitats, along with recreation fields and sports facilities. The state acquired the property in 2001.

SCHOOLS


AMBASSADOR HOTEL


The demolition of the former Ambassador Hotel is scheduled to finish by mid-March, making way for a multi-school campus for the Los Angeles Unified School District, said LAUSD spokeswoman Shannon Johnson-Haber. Plans call for building an 825-seat elementary school, a 1,400-seat middle school and a 2,150-seat high school on the 24-acre Wilshire Center site. An agreement was reached earlier between the school district and Los Angeles Conservancy to allow the structure to be torn down and the schools to be built in exchange for the creation of a $5 million Historic Resources Investment Fund. The pantry where Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated has been preserved.

CENTRAL LOS ANGELES AREA NEW HIGH SCHOOL NO. 9


Excavation has been ongoing and construction should begin in March on a new high school at 450 N. Grand Ave., the 10-acre site of the old Fort Moore, and the previous LAUSD headquarters. The school will house 1,728 students in 64 classrooms, arranged in four academies: music, dance, visual arts and performing arts. HMC is the architect of record and Coop Himmelblau is the design architect. LAUSD spokeswoman Shannon Johnson-Haber said the project is scheduled for completion by May 2008.

CENTRAL LOS ANGELES AREA HIGH SCHOOL NO. 10


Construction is scheduled to wrap this summer on the $138 million facility on both sides of Third Street in City West. The 1,713-student school features 14 acres of athletic facilities including two gymnasiums and an Olympic-sized swimming pool. The academics campus on the plot south of Third Street will feature 72 classrooms in a U-shaped plan surrounding a large courtyard, with a main entrance at Lucas Avenue. A pedestrian bridge will connect the two sites. Johnson Fain is the architect.

CENTRAL LOS ANGELES AREA NEW MIDDLE SCHOOL NO.
4

Construction is slated to wrap this summer on a $94 million middle school near Exposition Park, said school district spokeswoman Shannon Johnson-Haber. Designed by Culver City-based Steven Ehrlich Architects, the facility will house 1,200 students on nearly nine acres, with 63 classrooms, offices, a food service area, library, courtyard and multipurpose room.

COLBURN SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS


Construction is scheduled to wrap by summer 2007 on a $120 million expansion of the Colburn School at 200 S. Grand Ave. on Bunker Hill. Crews are currently working on the seventh floor of the project's 12-story tower, which will house 145 students, said school spokeswoman Barbara Vyden. The 300,000-square-foot expansion will also hold Colburn's new post-secondary music program and expanded pre-college program, and will feature a 200-seat performance venue along with classrooms, a 7,000-square-foot rehearsal hall, 50 practice rooms, a cafeteria and offices. Crews have also finished a three-level subterranean garage, she said. The Community Redevelopment Agency will lease the land to Colburn for $99 until 2082. Downtown-based Pfeiffer Partners is the architect.

LOS ANGELES TRADE-TECHNICAL COLLEGE


The $240 million revamp of the community college district's aging campus at Washington Boulevard and Grand Avenue south of Downtown is moving forward. Eight buildings on the 29-acre campus are receiving a major overhaul worth a total of $75 million. Last year crews finished the renovation of the F Building, which houses the automotive technology and arts and humanities centers, and the machine shop. Plans for twin five-story buildings are awaiting state approval. Those structures, each 128,000 square feet, will include student services, classrooms, lecture halls and administrative offices. Approval is pending for a new campus gymnasium. Officials last year also announced plans to renovate an existing Blue Line station near the school into a $3 million bus and rail plaza. The entire Trade-Tech project is scheduled for completion in 2008.

SCI-ARC LOT


Developer Richard Meruelo is still considering his options for a property he owns in the Arts District. Last June, a superior court judge ruled that the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) does not have the right to purchase the former train depot where it has leased space since 2000. The decision allows Meruelo, who owns numerous Downtown properties, to acquire the building. Meruelo also owns plots adjacent to the school and has discussed building on those sites. In the wake of the judge's ruling, Meruelo and SCI-Arc officials have pledged to work together to find a solution that benefits both parties.

USC HEALTH SCIENCES CAMPUS


The final piece of structural steel was installed in December on the 10-story Harlyne Norris Cancer Research Tower. The 172,000-square-foot structure, set for completion by 2007, will have five stories devoted to research, two for preventive medicine, a conference center, atrium, lobby and landscaped courtyard. Designs are also being prepared for a 20,000-square-foot research building on San Pablo Street, which could break ground later this year, said USC spokesman Jon Weiner. Additionally, construction is moving forward on the 200,000-square-foot Inpatient Tower at USC University Hospital. That is expected to open late this year, Weiner said.

USC UNIVERSITY PARK CAMPUS


Several major projects are underway on the USC campus near Downtown. Construction is expected to finish by August on the $23 million facelift of Webb Tower, which includes seismic and electrical upgrades. Additionally, work is expected to finish by summer 2007 on the second phase of Parkside Residential College, a 143,000-square-foot housing center for 440 students. The school is also building 1,100- and 1,200-car parking garages. Earlier this month, USC trustee Flora Thornton donated $5 million to the Thornton School of Music to build a $70 million structure on the campus by 2010. Overall, USC has committed nearly $300 million to construction projects on its University Park campus.

VISTA HERMOSA


The initial stages of construction have begun on Central Los Angeles High School No. 11, a campus for 3,100 students on the site of what was once known as the Belmont Learning Center, at First and Beaudry streets in City West. Four buildings will be converted into a 2,100-seat school. A separate 500-seat academy, cafeteria, library, student union and parents' center will also be developed on the 34-acre plot. The project will total 102 classrooms with 2,600 seats. Additionally, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy will develop a park on the site that would feature a soccer field, picnic area, fishing pond and outdoor amphitheater. Though concerns over dangerous gases and an earthquake fault below the campus have delayed the school for years and caused the razing of two buildings, officials said the problems can be mitigated. The LAUSD estimates the cost of the entire project at $111 million, on top of the $172 million already invested in the facility. Los Angeles Unified School District spokeswoman Shannon Johnson-Haber said the campus is scheduled to open in fall 2008. The entire project has been renamed Vista Hermosa.

CULTURAL/ENTERTAINMENT


ANGELS FLIGHT RECONSTRUCTION


John Welborne, president of the Angels Flight Railway Foundation, said the storied funicular that links Bunker Hill and the Historic Core should be open by summer. The two cars, Sinai and Olivet, have been repaired, and last June volunteers cleaned and painted the two stations. The short railway closed after a Feb. 1, 2001 accident in which one car slid down the track and crashed into the other, killing one person and injuring seven.

CALIFORNIA SCIENCE CENTER


The Exposition Park facility is in the middle of an $80 million expansion of its World of Ecology wing, which when completed in 2009 will include a series of interactive exhibits and live habitats. It's the second of three phases; the first included the main museum, a parking facility and a school. The third phase will house the air and space collection. The entire project is scheduled for completion in 2013.

CENTRAL AVENUE ART PARK


A three-acre public art park on the block bounded by First, Judge John Aiso, Temple and Alameda streets is still several years away. There is currently a parking lot on the site, and the project must wait until the new police headquarters parking facility is completed. Groundbreaking for the new lot should begin by July, said city Chief Legislative Analyst Gerry Miller. He added that formal designs for the art park will not be ready for at least a year.

CONVENTION CENTER HOTEL


Last month, officials announced that KB Home is partnering with Anschutz Entertainment Group on the Convention Center hotel next to Staples Center. Former developers Wolff Urban Management and Apollo Real Estate Advisors backed out over rising costs, now pegged at $625 million. The project, which is expected to be finished in three years, is being built concurrently with the L.A. Live entertainment district. The headquarters hotel has been redesigned to include an L-shaped structure at the base of the property. That will hold 900 rooms while 200 luxury rooms will be in the tower. The biggest change in plans comes in the number of condominiums planned for the tower's upper floors; instead of the original 100, the project will now feature 250 high-end units. Developers plan to select a hotel operator in the next month (Hilton had originally been tapped).

ECHO PARK POOL


After three years of disuse, construction began last August on a $6 million renovation of the Department of Recreation and Parks facility at 1410 Colton St. When finished, the heated, indoor pool will feature a new roof, electrical system, locker rooms, bathrooms and showers. Designed by West L.A.-based Frank R. Webb Architects, the upgrades are projected to be complete by October.

FOOTBALL STADIUM


City leaders and Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum officials continue to meet and work with the National Football League over a lease agreement and other issues related to getting an NFL team in the historic Exposition Park venue. However, the league is also meeting with Anaheim representatives. Coliseum plans call for spending upwards of $400 million to convert the facility into an NFL-suitable stadium by reducing the 92,500 seats to 78,000. The renovation would create 200 luxury suites, club level seating, new locker rooms, restrooms and concession areas. Although NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue has stated that he wants the league to return to Los Angeles by 2010, a decision on a local stadium could be delayed as the owners seek to negotiate a collective bargaining agreement with the players' association. That issue continues to drag.

GALEN CENTER


The $89 million, 225,000-square-foot USC arena is scheduled to open by August at Figueroa Street and Jefferson Boulevard. Designed by architecture firm HNTB, the 10,258-seat venue will host 130 events a year and serve as the home of the Trojan men's and women's basketball and volleyball teams. The nearly seven-acre complex will include the 55,000-square-foot Athletic Pavilion, which will house three practice gymnasiums and Athletic Department offices. The project will also hold a 1,200-car parking garage.

GANSEVOORT WEST


The demolition stage has begun on the conversion of the former Embassy Hotel and Theater at 851 S. Grand Ave. WSA Management and Chetrit Group plan to turn the nine-story structure into a 175-room boutique hotel. Crews are also restoring the building's 1,800-seat theater. The 1914 structure designed by Thornton Fitzhugh has served at various points as a church, hotel and a facility for USC. As the Trinity Theater, it was home to the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1919. Stephen B. Jacobs Group is the architect of the conversion. Kristen Hammer, a spokeswoman for the project, said it is scheduled to open in summer 2007. New York-based WSA is behind the Hotel Gansevoort in Manhattan and is also developing a hotel in Miami.

HARLEM PLACE


A bar and lounge that will occupy the old boiler room in the Higgins Building is nearly complete and a grand opening is scheduled by the summer, said Andrew Meieran, who is partnering on the venture with Marc Smith. Plans for the structure at 108 W. Second St. call for a traditional cocktail lounge in the basement room that once powered the 1910 building. Meieran said he has installed an industrial suspended elevator and a free-floating staircase. He also added a stage for live jazz performances. The bar is named after Harlem Place alley, a narrow lane between Spring and Main streets that once served as the epicenter of the city's music scene. Detailing and finishing touches should be completed within the next few months, said Meieran, who with Barry Shy converted the Higgins Building into 135 apartments two years ago.

L.A. FASHION CENTER


The foundation is complete and construction is underway on a 560,000-square-foot project at 1444 S. San Pedro St. It will house 196 for-purchase retail spaces and showrooms for garment wholesalers and manufacturers as well as a food court, FedEx, UPS and a Korean bank. The plan would allow small business owners to make permanent investments rather than monthly rental payments. The project is also known as LA FACE. The developer is Los Angeles Fashion Center, LLP.

L.A. LIVE


The former parking lot north of Staples Center is fenced off and is active with construction crews digging the foundation for this $2 billion sports and entertainment district. The project broke ground Sept. 15, and is on schedule to open its first phase in spring 2008. Elements include the 7,100-seat Nokia Theatre and the 2,400-seat Club Nokia, as well as restaurants, clubs (including the Conga Room), a 15-screen Regal cineplex, retail and other entertainment venues. The next phase will include a 70,000-square-foot, five-story ESPN broadcast studio, along with an ESPN Zone with retail, a two-level restaurant and an arcade. That structure is expected to be completed in 2009 at the corner of Figueroa and 11th streets. It will be the West Coast headquarters for the company.

LINDA LEA THEATER


Owner Cinema Properties Group recently signed a deal with New York-based ImaginAsian Entertainment to turn the 1920s movie house at 251 S. Main St. into an Asian-themed theater and cultural center. Called ImaginAsian Center, the 300-seat space will host screenings, performances and other events. A cafe serving a Pan-Asian menu is also planned. Culver City-based Hodgetts & Fung is the architect. Although the building is in disrepair now, project officials said construction is expected to finish by this summer.

MERCURY LIQUORS


Andrew Meieran intends to bring a bit of classic Hollywood nightlife to Downtown with his transformation of a former bank vault in the basement of the Los Angeles Trust and Savings Bank Building at 215 W. Sixth St. The retro bar has been slightly delayed by condo conversions taking place in the building above, but work should resume by the end of summer. The 6,000-square-foot basement will feature white marble floors, walnut wood paneling, polished stainless steel walls and much of the original architecture, including the vault's 38-ton circular door. The bar was previously known as "Bills."

NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM


Moves to update and expand the Natural History Museum are still on hold, said museum spokeswoman Jennifer Westfall. The Exposition Park museum is raising funds for the expansion, which has been pegged at about $300 million. Architect Stephen Holl completed a master plan several years ago.

SEVEN GRAND


Developer 213 Ventures hopes to start construction by March on a 4,500-square-foot whiskey bar on the second floor of 515 W. Seventh St. Project Manager Leann Rupprecht said the bar will also sell cigars and have live music. The cost is about $1 million. Construction is set to wrap by June, she said. The building, which also houses the developer's offices, is the former headquarters of Clifton's Cafeteria. Rupprecht said the company, headed by Cedd Moses, is looking for a restaurant operator for the first floor space.

VARIETY ARTS CENTER


Officials from Anschutz Entertainment Group (AEG) have indicated that they may redevelop the Variety Arts Center at 940 S. Figueroa St. in South Park. The 1924 property sits a few blocks from AEG's $2 billion L.A. Live entertainment complex, which broke ground last September. The Variety Arts Center is a registered historic cultural monument. The five-story Italian Renaissance-inspired building contains a 1,000-seat theater, a smaller theater, nightclub space, a lounge, a library and offices. It was built as the headquarters for the Los Angeles Friday Morning Club, a women's organization.

WILSHIRE GRAND HOTEL


In May, the Wilshire Grand Los Angeles at 930 Wilshire Blvd. will begin a $40 million renovation that will ultimately upgrade the hotel ballrooms, meeting venues, common areas, restaurants and all 900 guest rooms. The renovation was spurred by the $2 billion L.A. Live entertainment complex, including the Convention Center headquarters hotel, which is expected to boost demand for all Downtown hotel rooms. The four-year overhaul will be designed by Long Beach-based architect Concepts Four, and will include some structural changes.

NONPROFIT/COMMUNITY


CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT


A grand opening is scheduled for April for the $62 million headquarters of the California Endowment on a 6.5-acre plot near Terminal Annex at Alameda and Main streets, said Jeff Okey, a spokesman for the nonprofit. The project, by architect Rios Clementi Hale Studios, includes a five-story office building and a 16,000-square-foot, Mediterranean-inspired courtyard. Okey said building signage should go into place in the next few months. The nonprofit relocated Downtown from Woodland Hills.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH


Church leaders have prepared a draft proposal to expand their coming facility at Olympic Boulevard and Flower Street in South Park. The plan calls for a multipurpose room that could be used for services and by community members, said Rev. Sandie Richards. There is also a proposal to include some kind of residential element with both market rate and affordable housing units. No timeline has been set for the project and a groundbreaking has not been announced.

HOUSE EAR INSTITUTE


Construction was pushed back to this month for expansion of the House Ear Institute at Third and Alvarado streets west of Downtown, said spokeswoman Christa Spieth Nuber. The project, originally scheduled to break ground last summer, will add a three-story, 30,000-square-foot building to house offices and a research division. The Annenberg Foundation donated $10 million for the effort, part of a $40 million fundraising campaign. Nuber said issues with city permits and fluctuating supply costs caused the delay. Construction is slated to last about 18 months, she said. Perkins + Will is the architect.

INNER-CITY ARTS


Fundraising is underway on a $5 million plan to expand the campus of Inner-City Arts in the Industrial District. Plans by architect Michael Maltzan call for a new theater, ceramics complex, library resource center, children's community garden and administrative offices. About $2.5 million has been raised. A groundbreaking is scheduled for early 2007. A previous expansion added a 10,000-square-foot space for painting and drawing. The nonprofit annually provides arts education to 8,000 low-income students from 27 local schools.

JACCC EXPANSION


Officials from the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in Little Tokyo have put plans for a $15 million expansion on hold. Instead, staffers last year said they are focusing on interior renovations and mechanical improvements. These could include a digital education and learning center, a lecture and reception hall and a 3,000-square-foot community gallery. There is no timetable for the project.

LAC+USC MEDICAL CENTER REPLACEMENT FACILITY


Construction is 80% complete and is scheduled to finish by spring 2007 on the $820 million hospital on a 25-acre parcel at Merengo and Chicago streets northeast of Downtown, said Jon Weiner, a spokesman for USC. The 750-bed project includes a seven-story outpatient structure, a five-story diagnostic and treatment building and a central energy plant. The complex will replace a nearby facility damaged in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Office of Emergency Services and county bonds are financing the project. Los Angeles-based HOK and Santa Monica-based LBL Associated Architects are handling the designs.

LITTLE TOKYO RECREATION CENTER


Officials from the Little Tokyo Service Center (LTSC) and the city continue to iron out details for a recreation center on a city-owned parking lot south of the former St. Vibiana's Cathedral, said LTSC Executive Director Bill Watanabe. Plans call for a 60,000-square-foot multi-court facility that could also host martial arts tournaments, he said. The LTSC is raising funds for the project.

WHITE MEMORIAL MEDICAL CENTER


The hospital's new Patient Care Tower is scheduled to open in April. The seven-story structure features 167 beds, specialized surgical suites and 10 labor, delivery and recovery rooms. It is part of a $150 million renovation of the Boyle Heights facility. Crews are also updating the three-story east tower, which houses rehabilitation units, and the four-story north tower, which holds the hospital's cancer center, medical library, resident lounge and administrative offices. The 354-bed hospital serves about 165,000 people every year. The entire project should be complete by late next year.

OPENED IN THE PAST SIX MONTHS


726 LOFTS


Move-ins began earlier this year following the conversion of the four-story warehouse at 726 S. Santa Fe Ave. into 22 live-work lofts and six commercial spaces. Units in the 1904 Arts District structure range from 700 to 1,700 square feet with rents from $1,200 to $2,900. Downtown-based Western Imperial 2000 was the developer.

1500 SOUTH GRAND


Construction finished in November on a 62-apartment affordable housing complex at Venice Boulevard and Grand Avenue. The project by Mercy Housing California includes two-, three- and four-bedroom units above a parking garage, office space and a childcare facility operated by California Hospital Medical Center. The complex houses 233 people.

AUTO ROW


Construction wrapped earlier this month on a 75,000-square-foot auto dealership on the southeast corner of Figueroa Street and Washington Boulevard in the Figueroa Corridor. Designed by Whitfield Associates, the three identical two-story buildings will house Volkswagen, Audi and Porsche dealerships. The $16.5 million project is the first part of a plan by developer the Shammas Group to create a suburban-style auto mall along Figueroa Street.

LITTLE TOKYO BRANCH LIBRARY


A $3 million, 12,500-square-foot Los Angeles Public Library branch opened in September at Second and Los Angeles streets near Little Tokyo. Designed by Charles Walton Associates and Anthony J. Lumsden and Associates, the Asian-inspired facility boasts 5,500 volumes, 30 computer terminals, three gardens, a community room and a section devoted to Japanese culture and history. It serves residents of Little Tokyo and the Historic Core as well as Downtown workers.

MET LOFTS


Work wrapped in November on developer Forest City Residential's eight-story ground-up development at Flower and 11th streets. The 264 one- and two-bedroom units range from 700 to 1,400 square feet and market-rate apartments fetch $1,400 to $2,800; rents in 52 affordable units begin at $500. The $50 million, F-shaped structure also has 11,500 square feet of retail space. Johnson Fain Partners was the architect. The project was the site of a recent press conference touting Downtown's renaissance.

METRO 417


A grand opening was held in late October for the $78 million adaptive reuse apartment complex at Third and Hills streets. Developer Forest City Residential turned the 1925 Subway Terminal Building, once the terminus of the Pacific Electric Railway, into 277 luxury studio, one- and two-bedroom rental units. The 80-year-old structure also has three penthouses and a 108,000-square-foot parking garage.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR THE PRESERVATION OF DEMOCRACY


Construction finished in late October on a facility devoted to studying democracy and civil rights. Designed by architect Brenda Levin, the National Center, which is adjacent to the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo, features a 200-seat auditorium, gallery spaces, labs, multimedia areas and classroom. It is in the former Hongwanji Buddhist Temple. Since opening, the National Center has hosted several lectures and broadcasts.

OLYMPIC PRIMARY CENTER


The $8 million, two-story complex at 950 S. Albany St. in City West opened Sept. 6. The LAUSD facility, formerly known as the Belmont New Primary Center No. 11, holds 380 seats, 16 classrooms and includes a playground and a 34-space parking lot. Construction started in late 2003. The site is a former parking lot.

PACKARD LOFTS


A grand opening party was held earlier this month for the adaptive reuse of a former Packard car dealership. Developer Venice Investments spent $50 million converting the 1914 building at Hope Street and Olympic Boulevard into 116 apartments ranging from 750 to 2,000 square feet. The project includes a 25,000-square-foot retail space. Move-ins are scheduled to begin in early March. Venice Investments also is developing the nearby 18-story ground-up Hope Condos.

VIBIANA PLACE


The $8 million conversion of Saint Vibiana's into an event space wrapped in November. The former cathedral at Second and Main streets underwent seismic upgrading and crews removed pews, statues and religious emblems. The 129-year-old former headquarters of the Los Angeles Archdiocese had been mostly empty for nearly a decade after suffering extensive damage in the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Since construction finished, the building has hosted music performances, benefits and art shows. Developers Tom Gilmore and Richard Weintraub have additional plans to turn the former rectory, which faces out onto Second Street, into housing and develop an eatery on its ground floor. The building is next to the also recently opened Little Tokyo Branch Library.

Additional reporting by Andrew Haas-Roche, Kathryn Maese and Andrew Moyle.
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Old February 25th, 2006, 09:49 AM   #294
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Old February 25th, 2006, 05:45 PM   #295
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I hope this for one of the world biggest cities. Congratulations LA
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Old February 25th, 2006, 11:42 PM   #296
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WOW, I only knew of about a third of these projects. Was there anything mentioned of the Grand Av Project, and the Olive Street Tower? Didn't see anything.
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Old February 26th, 2006, 02:08 AM   #297
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GRAND AVENUE PLAN


A master plan to develop Grand Avenue and First Street between Hope and Hill streets into a $1.8 billion, 3.8-million-square-foot mixed-use complex was approved last year by city and county officials. Plans call for 400,000 square feet of retail, a 225-room boutique hotel, 2,600 residential units and a nine-acre retail and cultural promenade. Architect Frank Gehry has signed on to design a 50-story tower at Grand Avenue and Second Street. Related Companies is the developer. A series of public meetings are scheduled for this spring, with construction to start by December.


OLIVE STREET LOFTS


The project by developers CIM Group and the Lee Group has been sold, according to a CIM representative. While the buyer has not been revealed, crews are working on the tower on the southwest corner of 11th and Olive streets. Original plans called for the 17-story building to be turned into 105 for-purchase units, with a construction cost of $35 million.
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Old February 26th, 2006, 02:09 AM   #298
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FROM LOS ANGELES
WOW, I only knew of about a third of these projects. Was there anything mentioned of the Grand Av Project, and the Olive Street Tower? Didn't see anything.
GRAND AVENUE PLAN


A master plan to develop Grand Avenue and First Street between Hope and Hill streets into a $1.8 billion, 3.8-million-square-foot mixed-use complex was approved last year by city and county officials. Plans call for 400,000 square feet of retail, a 225-room boutique hotel, 2,600 residential units and a nine-acre retail and cultural promenade. Architect Frank Gehry has signed on to design a 50-story tower at Grand Avenue and Second Street. Related Companies is the developer. A series of public meetings are scheduled for this spring, with construction to start by December.


OLIVE STREET LOFTS


The project by developers CIM Group and the Lee Group has been sold, according to a CIM representative. While the buyer has not been revealed, crews are working on the tower on the southwest corner of 11th and Olive streets. Original plans called for the 17-story building to be turned into 105 for-purchase units, with a construction cost of $35 million.

hahahha
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Old February 26th, 2006, 07:22 AM   #299
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Old February 26th, 2006, 07:59 AM   #300
LANative
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Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 609
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Thanks for the list, a very long list. L.A.'s skyline is going to completely change.
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