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Old July 9th, 2017, 02:32 PM   #601
MrAronymous
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It is. But they state of Hawaii pays.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 09:51 PM   #602
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danton05 View Post
How is Honolulu paying $10bn for what is mostly an overground version of the Copenhagen Metro? That seems so insanely costly.
Actually its more crazy that people didn't assume this project would blow out of proportion. Every public project and the majority of private projects have cost overruns in Hawaii. Lets just say Hawaii is not a place to do business for the faint of heart. Copenhagen is a much cheaper place to do business and build infrastructure compared to Honolulu. When Hawaii built the H3 freeway it was the most expensive freeway project ever built, so its safe to assume any infrastructure project in this state will be beyond absurd in its costs.

Several factors at play

-Eminent Domain: Hawaii (Oahu) has some of the most expensive land in the world, and it would be comparable to that of building a brand new elevated metro in Manhattan. Even with all the challenges of building underground, it probably would have been cheaper to build portions of the rail underground as opposed to going fully elevated due to having to acquire all the land. They haven't even acquired all the land yet for Rail and the portions of land in Urban Honolulu will easily cost at least several hundred million.

-Construction/Labor costs: Hawaii has the highest construction costs in North America. Unionized construction workers make great money in this state and are some of the highest paid in North America for their respective position.

-Pay as you go: A foolish mistake made by local officials was to use a pay as you go financing structure for the project. They could have contained costs if they took out 30 year bonds to pay for the project. It was an incredibly foolish decision especially with interest rates being at record low levels. When they were figuring out the cost estimates for rail, nobody assumed prices would rise so much over the next few years as Hawaii was one of the first states to get out of the recession.

-Shipping costs: This shouldn't take much of an explanation. Honolulu is the most is the most isolated city in the world.
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Old July 16th, 2017, 01:07 PM   #603
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First half of July updates

First, good job floor23 on the last post. We ARE in the middle of the ocean.

Been busy but here are some recent photos.
First some "curves" of rail development
Central Waipahu
Recent rail pictures 1st half of July 2017 by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

New freeway exit into the Pearl Highlands station
Recent rail pictures 1st half of July 2017 by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

Rail and rainbows. Was following rail for miles the other day and so was this giant rainbow. A good omen.

West Waipahu
Rail & Rainbow by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

Rainbow and railbow bridges over freeway west Pearl City
Rail & Rainbow by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

West Pearl City
Rail & Rainbow by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr
Rail & Rainbow by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

New construction in phase 2 Keehi Lagoon - rail entering the city
Rail & Rainbow by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

Construction updates at the West Oahu University and West Loch (west Waipahu) stations where good progress is shown
Recent rail pictures 1st half of July 2017 by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr
West Oahu U station by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

Recent rail pictures 1st half of July 2017 by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr
Recent rail pictures 1st half of July 2017 by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr
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Old July 19th, 2017, 07:15 AM   #604
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Wow! Nice pics, Guys!! Looking good. Keep doing it!!

When it will be completed? How, when or what?
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Old July 28th, 2017, 10:47 AM   #605
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West Loch station coming up fast now - from 07-21-17

West Loch station west Waipahu now really going up fast and it's bigger looking than the renderings 07-21-17 by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr

West Loch station west Waipahu now really going up fast and it's bigger looking than the renderings 07-21-17 by cre8ive na8ive, on Flickr
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Old August 25th, 2017, 09:32 AM   #606
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Hopefully this deal makes it through the special session. *fingers crossed*

Lawmakers reach tentative rail funding agreement with GET extension, hotel tax increase

http://khon2.com/2017/08/23/lawmaker...ecial-session/

Hawaii lawmakers reached a tentative agreement Thursday, which means a special session to address funding for Honolulu’s rail project can begin next Monday.

With a Sept. 15 deadline to submit a financial plan to finish rail, lawmakers are feeling the pressure from the federal government. Negotiations have been extensive because billions of dollars are on the line.

After a full day of closed-door meetings, House and Senate leadership, along with U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz and Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, held a press conference to outline the bill, which includes the following:

• Extend the general excise tax surcharge on Oahu for three additional years, from Dec. 31, 2027 through Dec. 31, 2030. This will provide $1.046 billion.

• Raise the hotel room tax charged to visitors Transient Accommodations Tax(TAT) by one percent from 9.25 percent to 10.25 percent for 13 years, from Jan. 1, 2018 to Dec. 31, 2030. This also applies to timeshares. This will provide $1.326 billion.

• The current method of collecting the hotel room tax remains the same. It is collected statewide and goes directly into the general fund, not to the island where it is collected. Each county receives a specified amount of the tax regardless of total amounts collected. Raising the tax does not change that amount.

• Permanently increase the counties’ share of the TAT from its current $93 million base to $103 million.

• Reduce the State Department of Taxation’s administrative fee on the GET surcharge from 10 percent to one percent.

• Require a state-run audit of the rail project and annual financial reviews.

The bill also provides that funds collected for rail go into a new mass transit special fund. Lawmakers say that will allow the state to keep track of both spending and construction progress, rather than simply give the money to the city without any oversight, to ensure waste and fraud does not occur.

Lawmakers also say having two funding sources also provides greater security for the project, in case either the GET or TAT does not perform as expected.

House Speaker Scott Saiki (Kakaako, Downtown) says the $2.378 billion funding shortfall package will fund the rail project through Ala Moana and will not jeopardize the $1.55 billion in federal funding.

“By working with our colleagues in the Senate, the Legislature has come up with a concrete plan to fund the rail project that will reduce the overall costs while shifting some of the regressive tax burden away from our residents, who are struggling to make ends meet,” Saiki said. “This plan will not have a direct impact on neighbor island county budgets.

“We have taken a long look at the rail project and have heard the concerns of residents during our joint public hearing on rail funding this month. This is a critical infrastructure project for Hawaii. We are not giving the city a blank check, but instead insisting on audits and financial reviews and expenditures to provide complete transparency for our taxpayers,” he added.

Gov. David Ige says he’s happy lawmakers have come up with a way to save rail and that, in the long run, it will help Oahu’s economy.

“I’m elated that they arrived at a solution that provides sufficient funding. We believe we need to move forward with the project and the people of Hawaii want us to get it done,” he said.

Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell arrived at the State Capitol at around 4 p.m. to give his thoughts on the bill, and says he continues to have issues with the agreement.

“We are concerned about a potential funding gap, and we still remain concerned, and we don’t have a bill to analyze to see if in fact what they said in the worksheet is what’s in there, including issues dealing with the HART budget, operating budget of HART, and marketing budget of HART, and whether we’re going to be paying for previous payments already made,” Caldwell said.

“My hope is still that at the end of the day, they will have a dedicated revenue stream proposed by the Legislature that doesn’t come over to this side of Punchbowl so that we have to potentially go to our taxpayers and our bond-owner writers to see about putting in operating funds,” he added. “At the end of the day, we have to manage the risks of the City and County of Honolulu beyond just rail. It’s about protecting the city and it’s about protecting the taxpayers of this city.”

lawmakers say the deal with generate enough money to finish rail, but Caldwell says it will still come up short. Why the difference?

Always Investigating analyzed new HART projections that the rail authority came up with in light of the proposed state measures and found the project has gone from $8.2 billion to $8.7 billion with contingencies, plus about another $1 billion in borrowing costs, totaling about $9.7 billion.

That’s a half-billion dollar swing in base cost that the mayor told lawmakers in letter Thursday that the Federal Transit Administration requires to be included as a “stress-tested” cost model.

Hanabusa, who formerly served as chairwoman for HART’s Board of Directors, wasn’t buying it.

“I think, with all due respect to the mayor and the city, they can’t come out as they’ve done in the past and pick numbers out of the air,” she said. “If they want to do that, they have to be fair, and to say that these figures have been there all along is, in my opinion, not true. I could use another word, but it’s not true.”

The mayor’s letter says the half-billion-dollar stress contingency is the largest portion of the funding gap, but he also says a slower tourism growth rate would cause a shortage of extra rail funds.
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Old August 31st, 2017, 11:21 AM   #607
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Full Senate votes 16-9 in support of Oahu rail bailout

By Nanea Kalani
August 30, 2017

http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/0...-rail-bailout/

With all 25 state senators casting votes, legislation aimed at rescuing the city’s cash-strapped rail project by raising state taxes passed out of the full Senate today with a 16-9 vote and now heads over to the House of Representatives.

Senate Bill 4 would raise the hotel room tax statewide by 1 percentage point to 10.25 percent for the next 13 years to generate $1.32 billion for rail. The measure also would extend the half-percent general excise tax surcharge on Oahu for another three years — through 2030 — to raise $1.04 billion.

Some of the senators who opposed the bill said they do not support raising statewide taxes for a county-level project; do not support providing more money for a project they view as financially mismanaged; and do not support levying higher taxes on the visitor industry to subsidize rail.

Sen. Josh Green, who voted against the bill, told colleagues ahead of the vote that the Legislature has not been able to justify any GET increase to pay for critical state needs because the half-percent excise surcharge — which took effect in 2007 — is already dedicated to rail.

“We should ask ourselves: is funding one project more important than fixing our (public) hospitals, repairing our schools, hiring more teachers, providing affordable health care?” Green said.

Sen. Gil Riviere said while he is not opposed to rail, he could not support the funding measure to give more money to the project.

Riviere said he is not “anti-rail,” but “what I’m opposed to is this Brobdingnagian, budget-busting boondoggle that has become a black hole sucking” resources away from other priorities.

Sen. Wil Espero spoke in support of the bill, saying although he’s heard from constituents who are unhappy and frustrated with the rail project’s escalating costs, “unfortunately there is no turning back.”

“We’re not going to tear down what’s been built,” Espero said. “We need to complete this.”

The partially built rail project is significantly over budget, with estimated costs swelling from $5.26 billion in late 2014 to nearly $10 billion, including financing costs. The Federal Transit Administration has given the city a Sept. 15 deadline to show how it plans to raise the money to cover the budget gap. The FTA has already extended that deadline several times in the past 13 months.

The Senate votes were as follows:
YES
Stanley Chang (D-Diamond Head-Kahala-Hawaii Kai)
Donovan Dela Cruz (D-Wahiawa-Whitmore-Mililani Mauka)
Will Espero (D-Ewa Beach-Iroquois Point)
Mike Gabbard (D-Kapolei-Makakilo)
Brickwood Galuteria (D-Kakaako-McCully-Waikiki)
Les Ihara (D-Moiliili-Kaimuki-Palolo)
Gil Keith-Agaran (D-Waihee-Wailuku-Kahului)
Michelle Kidani (D-Mililani-Waikele-Kunia)
Donna Mercado Kim (D-Kalihi Valley-Moanalua-Halawa)
Clarence Nishihara (D-Waipahu-Pearl City)
Karl Rhoads (D-Downtown-Nuuanu-Liliha)
Maile Shimabukuro (D-Kalaeloa-Waianae-Makaha)
Jill Tokuda (D-Kailua-Kaneohe)
Glenn Wakai (D-Kalihi-Salt Lake-Aliamanu)
Ron Kouchi (D-Kauai-Niihau)
Brian Taniguchi (D-Makiki-Tantalus-Manoa)

NO
Roz Baker (D-West Maui-South Maui)
J. Kalani English (D-Molokai-Lanai-East Maui)
Josh Green (D-Naalehu-Kailua-Kona)
Breene Harimoto (D-Pearl Harbor-Pearl City-Aiea)
Lorraine Inouye (D-Kaupulehu-Waimea-North Hilo)
Kaiali‘i Kahele (D-Hilo)
Gil Riviere (D-Heeia-Laie-Waialua)
Russell Ruderman (D-Puna)
Laura Thielen (D-Hawaii Kai-Waimanalo-Kailua)
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Old August 31st, 2017, 02:17 PM   #608
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So there are no Republicans sitting on the Hawaii Senate?
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Old August 31st, 2017, 09:45 PM   #609
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So there are no Republicans sitting on the Hawaii Senate?
There are no republicans in the State Senate

In the state House of Rep, there are 46 democrats and 5 Republicans.

Hawaii has always been a one party dominated state. The Kingdom of Hawaii was obviously ruled by the monarchy, then after annexation during the territorial days the Republican Party were the dominant party, and since Statehood the Democratic Party have run the entire state with no competition and there is 0 signs that is going to change in the foreseeable future. Hawaii is the most blue state in the US and the Democrats win so often that the primary elections hold more relevance than the state general election.

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Old August 31st, 2017, 10:17 PM   #610
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Anyway, it is good to know the project is going ahead. I was a little worried they might have botched it (say, using "advanced bus lanes" for the key sector between the stadium and downtown). Now at least the first phase will be completed, though it seems doubtful extensions to the university campus or to Waikiki would be built soon.
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Old September 1st, 2017, 09:26 AM   #611
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Anyway, it is good to know the project is going ahead. I was a little worried they might have botched it (say, using "advanced bus lanes" for the key sector between the stadium and downtown). Now at least the first phase will be completed, though it seems doubtful extensions to the university campus or to Waikiki would be built soon.
Well technically the House still has to pass the bill, but its already been passed in the House Transportation Committee, and passed its second reading today(Thursday). The entire House will vote on the bill tomorrow and its expected to pass(according to many local news sites)and then Governor Ige is expected to sign it.

While the current political climate right now would make it difficult to get extensions to UH Manoa or Waikiki, I suspect that when they finish the 1st phase they will find a way to keep expanding the project. There are just too many jobs in building the rail to stop it at Ala Moana Mall and not continue onward. I definitely see an expansion to UH Manoa, however Waikiki may somewhat difficult and I think there are people in both the State, County, and business community who would rather see new tourist districts formed a long the rail line as opposed to pushing it into Waikiki. Already there is 1 hotel approved next to the line, 1 being proposed (will get approved) and 4 to 5 other mixed-use/hotels in the early planning stages.
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Old September 2nd, 2017, 04:18 AM   #612
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House approves rail funding proposal, bill heads to governor for signature
http://khon2.com/2017/09/01/house-approves-rail-funding-proposal-bill-heads-to-governor-for-signature/


Rail bail-out bill goes to Ige after House approves
http://www.staradvertiser.com/2017/0...ouse-approves/

Bill to generate $2.4B for rail bailout now headed to governor's desk
http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/3...governors-desk

HOW THEY VOTED

Yes

Henry Aquino (D, Waipahu)

Della Au Belatti (D, Moiliili-Makiki-Tantalus)

Ty Cullen (D, Waipahu-Royal Kunia-Makakilo)

Beth Fukumoto (D, Mililani-Mililani Mauka-Waipio Acres)

Cedrick Gates (D, Waianae-Makaha-Makua)

Daniel Holt (D, Chinatown-Iwilei-Kalihi)

Linda Ichiyama (D, Salt Lake-Moanalua Valley)

Kaniela Ing (D, South Maui)

Ken Ito (D, Kaneohe-Maunawili-Kailua)

Aaron Ling Johanson (D, Fort Shafter-Moanalua Gardens-Aliamanu)

Jarrett Keohokalole (D, Kahaluu-Aliamanu-Kaneohe)

Bert Kobayashi (D, Diamond Head-Kaimuki-Kapahulu)

Chris Lee (D, Kailua-Lanikai-Waimanalo)

Matthew LoPresti (D, Ewa Villages-Ocean Pointe-Ewa Beach)

Sylvia Luke (D, Punchbowl-Pauoa-Nuuanu)

Bob McDermott (R, Ewa Beach-Iroquois Point)

John Mizuno (D, Kamehameha Heights-Kalihi Valley)

Dee Morikawa (D, Niihau-Koloa-Kokee)

Nadine Nakamura (D, Hanalei-Princeville-Kapaa)

Mark Nakashima (D, Kukuihaele-Laupahoehoe-North Hilo)

Takashi Ohno (D, Nuuanu-Liliha-Alewa Heights)

Richard Onishi (D, South Hilo-Keaau-Honuapo)

Marcus Oshiro (D, Wahiawa-Whitmore-Poamoho)

Scott Saiki (D, Downtown-Kakaako-McCully)

Joy San Buenaventura (D, Pahoa-Kalapana)

Joe Souki (D, Waihee-Waiehu-Wailuku)

Gregg Takayama (D, Pearl City-Waimalu-Pacific Palisades)

Roy Takumi (D, Pearl City-Waipio-Pearl Harbor)

Justin Woodson (D, Kahului-Wailuku-Puunene)

Ryan Yamane (D, Mililani-Waipio-Waikele)

Kyle Yamashita (D, Sprecklesville-Upcountry Maui)

No

Tom Brower (D, Waikiki-Ala Moana-Kakaako)

Romy Cachola, (D, Sand Island-Kalihi-Airport)

Richard Creagan (D, Naalehu-Captain Cook-Keauhou)

Lynn DeCoite (D, Lanai-Molokai-Paia-Hana)

Cindy Evans (D, Kaupulehu-Waimea-Halaula)

Sam Kong (D, Halawa-Aiea-Newtown)

Nicole Lowen (D, Holualoa-Kailua-Kona- Honokohau)

Angus McKelvey (D, Lahaina-Kaanapali-Honokohau)

Sean Quinlan (D, Wailua-Kahuku-Waiahole)

Calvin Say (D, Palolo-St. Louis Heights-Kaimuki)

Cynthia Thielen (R, Kailua-Kaneohe)

Chris Todd (D, Hilo-Waiakea-Keaukaha)

James Tokioka (D, Wailua-Hanamaulu-Lihue)

Andria Tupola (R, Kalaleloa-Ko Olina-Maili)

Gene Ward (R, Kalama Valley-Queen’s Gate-Hawaii Kai)

Absent

Rep. Isaac Choy (D, Manoa-Punahou-Moiliili)

Reps. Sharon Har (D, Kapolei-Makakilo)

Mark Hashem (D, Hahaione Valley-Aina Haina-Kahala)

Scott Nishimoto (D, McCully-Moiliili-Kapahulu)

Lauren Matsumoto (R, Mililani-Schofield-Kunia)
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Old September 4th, 2017, 06:53 AM   #613
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floor23 View Post
In the state House of Rep, there are 46 democrats and 5 Republicans.
But 25 senators? I [obviously] don't know how it is in Hawaii, but in Washington each of the 49 districts has one senator and two representatives, thus 49 and 98. In many states senators number twice the number of representatives. Why the extra Hawaii representative? One at-large?
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Old September 5th, 2017, 06:34 AM   #614
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floor23 View Post
While the current political climate right now would make it difficult to get extensions to UH Manoa or Waikiki, I suspect that when they finish the 1st phase they will find a way to keep expanding the project. There are just too many jobs in building the rail to stop it at Ala Moana Mall and not continue onward. I definitely see an expansion to UH Manoa, however Waikiki may somewhat difficult and I think there are people in both the State, County, and business community who would rather see new tourist districts formed a long the rail line as opposed to pushing it into Waikiki.
Waikiki will be a tough sell unless it's underground, which would be super expensive but amazing. If/when it's extended to UH Manoa, it'll be down Kapiolani and up University. Then you have a station at the convention center for sure, and possible stops up University, with maybe two at either end of the school.

Anyway, awesome that it'll happen.
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Old September 5th, 2017, 11:51 AM   #615
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Doesn't an extension from the university to Waialae make more sense (instead of building rail up the valley)?
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Old September 6th, 2017, 02:56 AM   #616
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Old September 6th, 2017, 03:42 AM   #617
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Doesn't an extension from the university to Waialae make more sense (instead of building rail up the valley)?


If your talking about it going towards Kaimuki and Kahala? I don't see it being possible in my lifetime. I could see it being extended towards Ko'olina or towards Mililani as a branch, but not eastward from UH Manoa.
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Old September 6th, 2017, 05:20 AM   #618
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Here's the planned extensions from a HART 20080815-Visual and Aesthetic Resources Technical Report:
20080815-Visual and Aesthetic Resources Technical Report-1
by miniviews, on Flickr


20080815-Visual and Aesthetic Resources Technical Report-3 by miniviews, on Flickr

Based on City Council discussions (www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLKy5S0hN5I), extension to Waikiki (and perhaps University of Hawaii Manoa) is a single track vice double track configuration.

Recent HART reports also discuss shifting Ala Moana station Ewa (West) to allow a shift from Kona St to Kapiolani St prior to Ala Moana Center center wing for an extension to UH Manoa. I'm unsure how this will occur considering there's a plan for another SamKoo development ( 1391 Kapiolani Blvd) adjacent to Ala Moana Center station
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Old September 23rd, 2017, 11:30 PM   #619
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Quote:
HART submits rail recovery plan to FTA

By Brigette Namata, Gina Mangieri and Web Staff
Published: September 18, 2017, 1:10 pm Updated: September 19, 2017, 7:44 pm

The Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation (HART) has released its recovery plan for the Honolulu Rail Transit Project.

The plan was due to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) on Friday, Sept. 15.

Officials say the updated project financial plan reflects the recent deliberations and actions of both state and city governments to provide additional local funding for completion of the construction of the project to Ala Moana Center.

There’s no more Plan B, which ends rail at Middle Street. There’s only Plan A, which is to build all the way down to Ala Moana Center.

In the plan, HART admits the project “has faced numerous challenges that have resulted in cost increases and schedule delays,” and is committed to getting the project back on-track.

Right now, the rail is only 38-percent complete. It’s scheduled to open for full passenger service on Dec. 31, 2025 — eight years away.

The total project cost included in the plan remains at $8.165 billion for capital costs exclusive of finance charges, with full revenue service scheduled for December 2025.

Financing charges of $858 million are also projected, bringing the total project amount to $9.023 billion, including contingency.

HART says the revenue to cover the cost will come from the federal funds as outlined in the project’s Full Funding Grant Agreement, receipt of the county surcharge on the state General Excise Tax, one percent of the state Transient Accommodations Tax, and a subsidy from the City and County of Honolulu.

HART believes this cost estimate and schedule are realistic and achievable.

Andrew Robbins, HART’s new executive director and CEO, says he intends to bring the build in as low as possible from here on out.

“This updated recovery plan lays out the local funding now available to meet the current cost estimate and complete the project,” said Robbins. “One of the many messages I have also given is this is a $7 billion project, because the rest of it is contingency. We should be managing to that budget and the contingency is contingency. We don’t want to assume that’s going to be gobbled up in the cost, so that’s the mindset that I want our staff to have, is that the project is $7 billion. It’s not even the $8.1 billion, because that’s the contingency on top of the $7 billion.”

Officials now plan to open the rail in three phases. HART writes of opening nine stations from East Kapolei to Aloha Stadium in 2020.

Then, a potential second opening would occur around 2023, from Aloha Stadium to Middle Street. That section would be about five miles and three stations: Pearl Harbor, the Airport, and Lagoon Drive.

In a statement, Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell urges HART to stick to schedule:

“Now that the Hawaii State Legislature, Gov. David Ige, Honolulu City Council leadership and HART have done necessary legwork to complete the rail project all the way to Ala Moana with a new financial plan delivered to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), it’s time for us to refocus on what this project will mean to the future of Oahu residents. There is no alternative on the horizon that will provide transportation equity to the tens of thousands of families who will use rail every day to get into town quickly and easily, without giving up a large portion of their lives. Doing nothing is unacceptable, and although construction of the rail project has been a challenge, it will provide opportunities for affordable housing and transit-oriented development that would not exist without it. I urge the HART Board and new HART Executive Director Andrew Robbins to closely manage the financial plan submitted to the FTA on September 15 and to adhere to the construction timetable for this fully automated rail system.”

HART says if the FTA approves the plan, grant payments could start up again by next summer. Meanwhile, HART is borrowing city bond money to pay bills.

An FTA spokesperson told KHON2 Monday: “FTA is reviewing the plan and will communicate with HART regarding any questions or requests for additional information, as necessary.”

The cost of rail operation and maintenance

The state bailout shifted about $20 million a year in HART administration costs over to city taxpayers, but a recovery plan section called “Operations and Maintenance” covers how hundreds of millions more will be needed every year within decades to run the train and buses.

Taxpayers already pay to support TheBus and Handi-Van. It costs $256 million a year to operate those, and fares cover only 27 percent, so city budgets are used to covering the difference — about $186 million.

The recovery plan says that by year 2036, the bus-and-rail will cost as much as $843 million a year with TheBus more expensive than rail in that number. Still just 27 percent is expected to be paid by fares, so taxpayers have to cover $615 million.

That’s a difference of $429 million a year that the city’s operating budget will need to plan for.

So what can the city tap to cover that?

The plan says they’ll offset as much as possible with things like advertising, parking revenue at rail park-n-rides, and selling right of way for utilities like power or fiber optic along the guideway path.

But the majority will come from taxes and fees, some of which are already bumping up in anticipation, like vehicle weight tax and parking meter increases.

What about possibly increasing property taxes? They are the city’s biggest revenue source, and at the public hearings for the state bailout bill, the mayor mentioned setting aside some from new development along the rail line.

Tackling the operations-and-maintenance price tag can also come from cutting expenses, like bus service reductions where it’s possible to streamline, such as along the rail routes.

Bus ridership in Honolulu has dropped as much as 10 percent over the past couple years, which reflects a national trend.

The recovery plan still counts on ridership growth, but this version does acknowledge the risk and looks at what could happen if bus and rail trips dropped 5, 10 and 15 percent from projections.

That could mean between $5 million and $17 million a year less in fares, so more from your pocketbook.
http://khon2.com/2017/09/18/hart-sub...y-plan-to-fta/
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Old September 26th, 2017, 08:03 AM   #620
N830MH
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Join Date: Jun 2015
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Yeah, they won't be done for next decade. If I go to Hawaii. I am pretty sure about that. I can used on rail from airport to the beach.
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