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Old November 24th, 2010, 04:31 AM   #101
hkskyline
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I have some older articles on the rail project in the urban transport subforum : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=312546
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Old November 24th, 2010, 04:55 AM   #102
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kewl thread! Thanks! Shows the world the wonderful controversy we've had over this entire project.

Of note - (regarding Mass Transit on Oahu)
The Super Ferry was closed and shut out as expenses got too big (?!?). this is a direct result of special interests filing lawsuits and driving up costs. The EIS was also a serious point of contention as then Governor Lingle "kinda pushed it through" without follow proper procedures and protocol. The two ferries have been sold to other companies since then... and our dreams of inter-island ferries went as well.
TheBoat (smaller ferry from West Oahu to the Aloha Tower) was also closed and shut out (due to finances & the expense of upkeeping the small ferries)
TheBus - our current (and still the best) bus system. It is being pushed to the maximum though as ridership, routes and costs escalate.
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Old November 24th, 2010, 06:54 AM   #103
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Wow great, pics...


how to deal with depression
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Old January 17th, 2011, 04:05 PM   #104
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Honolulu Transit Project

Ansaldo STS told investors on 14 January that bids envelopes for Honolulu High Capacity Transit Project will be open soon and the contract could be awarded by June 2011. EUR 0,2 - 0,9 bn is their estimate of the value of the contract (I think their share) if found winners. Co named Bombardier as competing bidder
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Old January 20th, 2011, 10:12 AM   #105
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The Honolulu Rail Transit Project was cleared on Jan 18, 2011 by the Federal Transit Authority but timing of federal funding (25% of total) remains unclear.


* With a “Record Of Decision” FTA officers confirmed yesterday to the City of Honolulu that the HRTP has met all regulation requirement, according to web sources.

* The amount and the timing of federal contribution is however unclear for now.
In particular a “Full Funding Grant Agreement”, that is necessary to tap the Congress’ purse, is not in place yet and it is unlikely to be issued before late this year or early 2012, according to the same sources.
The HRTP’s depends on federal funds for about 25% (or USD 1.4bn-est) of total spend.

* Once issued such FFGA will have to be cleared by the US Transportation Committees in the Senate and in the House of Representatives. In the Senate TC there should be no problem (head: J. Rockefeller – Dem W. Virginia) but also in the HoR the Transport Committee is headed by a Republican that is noted for his pro-rail stance (headed by J. Mica – Rep Florida, on his stance see eg www.thetransportpolitic.com, Nov 4, 2010)

* After a CTs clearance funds for the HRTP will have to be provided each year by rulings by the Senate and the House of Reps Appropriation Committees.
The AC at the Senate should be no problem as it is headed by D. Inouye, a Democrat elected in Hawaii. The AC in the HoR could be more of a hurdle (headed by H. Rogers, Rep Kentucky).
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Old February 25th, 2011, 02:48 AM   #106
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Great strides in Honolulu. From The Transport Politic:
Quote:
Rapid Transit Closer to Realization as Honolulu’s Rail Project Breaks Ground



» $5.5 billion, automated rail corridor is expected to attract 100,000 daily riders once it is completed in 2019.

A week after the Federal Transit Administration recommended it for New Starts funding, Honolulu’s rapid transit project took a step forward today with a ceremonial groundbreaking. The massive scheme, which will extend 20 miles from downtown to East Kapolei once construction is finished in 2019, will radically redefine transport on Oahu, offering residents a true alternative to traffic-plagued surface streets and highways.

Honolulu and the surrounding municipalities — incorporated into Honolulu County — are hemmed in by a geography whose natural barriers make the tropical metropolis practically ideal for fixed-guideway transit like the system that is now being designed. With mountains to the north and the Pacific Ocean to the south, there is little room for the city to expand, so the only place it can go is up. The “Manhattanization” of downtown and nearby Waikiki over the past few decades is representative of this trend. And transit is a popular way to get around — The Bus, the local transit agency, carries 236,000 daily riders, and the city has a transit work commute share of more than 10%, which is the highest of any major city without rail in the United States and about the same as the City of Portland.

Honolulu is not enormous: The city (officially, the Census-designated place) has about 375,000 residents while the island as a whole has 900,000. But the deficit of space means there is no room for expanded roads infrastructure, and the lack of adequate public transit infrastructure operating in its own guideway poses a serious threat to the health of the region. Without better transportation, the city will not be able to densify further. Current decentralization trends, pushing habitation into previously untouched parts of the island, will be unstoppable.

Thus the likely commitment of the federal government to the rail project sometime in the next year or so is good news for Honolulu and Hawai’i as a whole, since the city serves as the state’s economic engine. Of $5.5 billion in construction costs to cover the 20 miles and 21 stations, Washington proposes to contribute $1.55 billion ($250 million in Fiscal Year 2012) — as long as the New Starts program continues to be funded. The city, which introduced a 1/2¢ sales tax in 2005, will cover the rest. Real construction activity will not begin for several more months.

The alignment, which roughly parallels the curve of the south Oahu coast, hits most of the major destinations in the metropolitan area, including downtown, the airport, and two institutions of higher learning (including one now being built). Especially when considering already high ridership along similar routes, the 2030 estimates of 116,300 daily riders do not seem impossible. And relatively short extensions west into Kapolei, northeast to the University of Hawaii-Manoa, southeast to Waikiki, and north into the Salt Lake neighborhood would make the line even more desirable if they are ever funded and built.

Despite the clear need for improved transportation systems in Honolulu, however, the project’s gestation has been difficult. Previous rail transit proposals were cancelled in 1981 and 1992 and a planned bus rapid transit line was abandoned in 2004. The arrival of Mufi Hannemann in the mayor’s office in early 2005, though, brought significant political support for a new rail line. The mayor pushed through the transit tax and won a hard-fought election against a rail opponent in 2008, as well as a voter endorsement of the project. A fight with Governor Linda Lingle, who argued that the project was too expensive to justify its costs, ensued.

Yet the recent election of Governor Neil Abercrombie and Mayor Peter Carlisle, both of whom assumed office in 2010, represented a major step forward, as each have been solid defenders of the project. As construction moves forward, the city will benefit from this show of support from the municipal and state governments.

It is true that the project remains under debate on both aesthetic and land use grounds.

The elevated nature of the system has a number of advantages: It will allow trains to run much more quickly between the ends of the island (at almost 30 mph on average) than would be possible with an at-grade light rail corridor running through intersections, and it will offer automated trains, allowing high frequencies even off-peak (6 minute maximum) and lower labor costs because of the lack of train drivers.

Nonetheless, the elevated guideway will not be a particularly beautiful addition to the Hawai’i landscape, and in some places it could represent a barrier between the city and its waterfront. The alignment will require 20 residences and 66 businesses to be bulldozed. It is also expensive: A ground-level light rail line or a busway could probably be built for fewer funds. Yet neither would provide the kind of mobility benefits the automated rail line would.

Moreover, opponents of the project suggest that its appeal — fast transit times from downtown to the far west side of the island — will encourage sprawl in areas around the planned university and in Kapolei. Indeed, there are already proposals on the books for a giant project with thousands of homes that will shift patterns of house-building activity to this area. Is it worth paving over now-agricultural land for the purposes of building park-and-rides with the assumption that in the future these areas will become transit-oriented cities of their own?

But Doug Carlson, writing on his site, poses a different question: Does Honolulu have any choice? Given that the city will continue to increase in population, the number of automobiles running up and down its highways will only ramp-up as well. Assuming that growth is inevitable, the city might have no option but to promote new communities designed for commuting by public transit. In that case, this rail project seems completely justifiable.
(The Transport Politic, 2011)
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Old February 25th, 2011, 02:49 AM   #107
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What is very interesting for me is that British Columbia Rapid Transit Company (SkyTrain), is a partner and is involved in the Bombardier Transit Team Venture:

http://bombardiertransitteam.com/ourteam.html
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Old March 24th, 2011, 08:28 AM   #108
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AnsaldoBreda won.

At least their driverless metro concept is half-decent.
http://www.bizjournals.com/pacific/n...contracts.html
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Old March 25th, 2011, 01:26 AM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manrush View Post
AnsaldoBreda won.

At least their driverless metro concept is half-decent.
http://www.bizjournals.com/pacific/n...contracts.html
Oh god no, why in the hell does that company keep winning contracts?
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Old March 25th, 2011, 03:41 AM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FDW View Post
Oh god no, why in the hell does that company keep winning contracts?
By doing what they always do: underbidding the competition.

Anyway, the AnsaldoBreda driverless metro concept is pretty much their only non-problematic product.

What's weird to me is that Rotem didn't enter this race. They also underbid their competitors, but at least offer higher quality products.

Or Kinki-Sharyo, even. Not only do they have experience building light rail, but they also have metro construction experience (including driverless).

Last edited by manrush; March 25th, 2011 at 03:52 AM.
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Old March 26th, 2011, 01:12 AM   #111
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Thanks for the info - so I guess the trains will look a lot like the Copenhagen Metro - pretty nice!

http://www.ansaldohonolulurail.com/i...enhagen_UK.pdf
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Old January 6th, 2012, 03:33 AM   #112
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NY Times

Quote:
After 40-Year Battle, Train May Roll for Oahu



By ADAM NAGOURNEY

Published: January 3, 2012

KAPOLEI, Hawaii — From the farmlands here on the western side of Oahu, the hotels of Honolulu and the bluffs of Diamond Head can be seen rising 20 miles in the distance. This is rural Hawaii: waves and coastline on one side, lush mountains on the other and barely a building or vehicle in sight.

But sometime this spring, a $5.3 billion project is scheduled to rise from the Kapolei farmlands that offers powerful evidence of how much this island, a symbol of Pacific tranquillity, is changing. A 40-year battle to build a mass transit line appears to be nearing its end. Barring a court intervention, construction is to begin in March on a 20-mile rail line that will be elevated 40 feet in the air, barreling over farmland, commercial districts and parts of downtown Honolulu, and stretching from here to Waikiki.

The two-track line —a 30-foot-wide span, with 21 elevated stations — is designed to accommodate an increasing crush of commuters and tourists while encouraging new growth and development, particularly on this undeveloped part of the island. The Honolulu rail project, scheduled for completion in 2018, seems certain to change sharply the nature of much of the south side of the island, as well as downtown Honolulu.

[...]
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Old January 6th, 2012, 11:51 AM   #113
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Why did they include graffiti in the simulation pictures?....
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Old January 6th, 2012, 02:42 PM   #114
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every one loves graffiti what would bridges, elevated railways and highways be without graffiti.
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Old January 6th, 2012, 09:32 PM   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoulderGrad View Post
Why did they include graffiti in the simulation pictures?....
I guess they are trying to make the renderings more realistic.
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Old January 20th, 2013, 06:33 PM   #116
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For those who think a subway in Hololulu is impossible, check this out

http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/ar...706130406.html
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Old January 20th, 2013, 11:51 PM   #117
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Link doesn't work with me. Did you mean this one? http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/b...180012291.html
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Old January 21st, 2013, 05:04 PM   #118
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micro View Post
Link doesn't work with me. Did you mean this one? http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/b...180012291.html
Worked for me. It shows an old underground railway the navy built.
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Old January 21st, 2013, 05:19 PM   #119
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Why aren't there building a 1st phase over Waikiki beach, where most tourists stay?

Also, a semi-related question: do they have any plan to build a cable car or funicular up the Diamond Head?
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Old January 21st, 2013, 05:56 PM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Why aren't there building a 1st phase over Waikiki beach, where most tourists stay?

Also, a semi-related question: do they have any plan to build a cable car or funicular up the Diamond Head?
Because that wouldn't benefit the vast majority of residents.
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