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Old September 20th, 2011, 06:05 PM   #2621
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A crane was assembled at 122 Leadenhall during the weekend.

by lumberjack.

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Untitled by Lumberjack_London, on Flickr
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 12:48 AM   #2622
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First-class return

Forming the cultural centrepiece of developer Argent’s 27 ha mixed-use commercial scheme at London’s King’s Cross is the striking new Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. The £110m project consolidates all the faculties of the school into one campus.


The north elevation of the granary building addresses the east-west link and the new college building. Traces of the old sheds remain and give character

[
The main “street” of the new Central Saint Martins extends over 150m northwards between the east and west transit sheds


The new studio buildings are inserted between the existing Victorian transit shed walls and behind the granary building

At the end of this month 5,000 students and staff will be passing through its doors into a 39,000m2, state-of-the-art concrete and glass building containing studios, lecture theatres and seminar rooms, along with a theatre, bars, refectory and an enormous multi-use atrium running almost the full length of the building acting as the social heart of the new University of the Arts London.

But the most interesting thing about the new college is that approaching from three sides, you would be hard pressed to notice there was a new building there. This is because the whole college is flanked not only by two Victorian “east” and “west” transit sheds measuring 180m x 25m, but to the south by a beautiful 55m x 31m six-storey brick, cast iron and timber granary building.

The eastern transit shed is to become the college’s workshop spaces, while the granary building is to become the library and administrative building. Forming the campus’s outer edge, the new structure has been skillfully inserted within these existing facades, like an egg in a box.

To achieve this, the existing grade II-listed buildings, designed in 1851 by architect Lewis Cubitt, had to undergo extensive refurbishment. This would prove to be not only a significant engineering challenge, it required the contractor to jump through hoops with
the conservation lobby.

The works were carried out using a planning permission riddled with “reserved matters”, which had to be resolved in a strict seven-week period, and under a two-stage Design and Build contract — one of the least amenable contracts to use on a project full of uncertainties.

According to Michael Beare of AKS Ward Lister Beare, the conservation engineer for the new development, which worked on the restoration of neighbouring St Pancras, this was not made any easier by the fact that the steel trusses of the transit sheds’ roofs needed to be removed to allow the piling works for the new building to be carried out. “It gave us a lot of trouble, as the walls were effectively unsupported, sitting on corbelled foundations that ran as far as 6m down into the basement stables and at the original ground level of the site,” recalls Beare. “This meant the bespoke design of temporary propping to support the walls while new construction went ahead.”

Along their lengths, walls were out of tolerance by up to 80mm, which exceeded British Standards. Helical tie bars were inserted into the existing masonry to give additional strength to the heritage walls and were monitored for movement during construction of the new structure. The transit shed roofs were reconstructed using timber glulam beams, rather than steel, to reintroduce their original materials, as well as ensuring they conformed with the latest Part L of the Building Regulations.

Many of the blind arches that formed the original eastern transit shed were opened out to allow the sheds to become part of the new design, says Beare.

The brickwork was in bad condition and the brick bonding was not consistent through the 400mm thickness of the walls, which meant that simply removing them from beneath the arch was not possible. “It meant that not only did we have to saw through the brick, we needed additional steels inserted with a curved web and flange to support the arches themselves,” explains Beare.

All the removed bricks were re-used elsewhere on the site. Brickwork joints were all restored using original lime mortars (see box) which, due to the longer periods required to reach 28-day strength, needed to be monitored to check that walls were assuming the loadings correctly.

In addition, none of the masonry walls had damp proof courses (DPCs), as they originally relied on airflow past the surface of the brick to evaporate moisture. Installing new ones in walls that at points are 1m thick is difficult, especially as they would need to be natural slate and the use of waterproof renders would merely move the problem to elsewhere in the wall. Therefore the decision was made to ensure that internal air exchanges would continue that air flow, and particular attention was given to monitoring moisture levels in the basement.

...
http://construction-manager.co.uk/fe...-class-return/

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A very modern art school

Central Saint Martins college of art and design's move to a massive new space behind King's Cross station is an unbelievable stroke of luck for the developers of the goods yard.

Urban projects in a city such as London struggle most of all to create the institutional richness of the centre of the city. Educational, religious, charitable or cultural establishments usually can't afford to pay the rents that commercial developers want, so most developers simply do not include them in their plans. New parts of London, such as More London on the Southbank and Paddington Basin, are left with only retail chains for public use.

So when Central St Martins was persuaded to move lock, stock and barrel to a massive former granary at King's Cross, developer Argent, which is in charge of a huge building programme on the site, must have thanked the gods. Instantly, King's Cross Central (as it is branded) will have a population of around 4,000 art students wandering through it and an internationally renowned cultural venue to bolster the appeal of the place to visitors.

The 67-acre development is located on a vast triangle of land between King's Cross and St Pancras stations, spanning the Regent's Canal. It is so significant that it even has its own postcode: N1C. Until recently it was a derelict site full of out-of-date railway infrastructure and the landmark gasholders that many Londoners will be familiar with. Work has been going on for years preparing infrastructure for new development and Central St Martins is the first organisation to move in, beginning the 2011/12 academic year in just a couple of weeks' time.

Central St Martins is the result of an amalgamation in 1989 of St Martins School of Art, founded in 1854, and the Central School for Arts and Crafts, which was set up in 1896. Its best-known home is at Holborn in the Lethaby Building, named after the architect and founding principal, William Lethaby. It also has locations in Soho, Clerkenwell and Archway. It is one of the most famous arts schools in the world with alumni including Lucian Freud, Antony Gormley and Stella McCartney, and courses in an array of disciplines from fine art to silversmithing, performative arts to fashion.

The architects Stanton Williams originally won a design competition to look at options for the re-use and extension of the school's existing facilities, but when the decision was made to move to King's Cross, a quite different design task faced them. The £170 million budget gives you a sense of the scale of the building - it is a superstore of cultural education on an unprecedented, probably unrepeatable scale.

The new institution has been slotted into a massive, listed former granary complex once used to coordinate the transport of produce from the Midlands to London. The entrance façade of the new school, which faces a new public space the size of Trafalgar Square, is a stately, functional warehouse building, designed by Lewis Cubitt in the 1850s. Inside are sited the reception for the school and the library for the University of the Arts (a federal university of which CSM is a part), as well as office space.

Most of the educational accommodation is in two new buildings sited behind this listed building, in two long, six-storey fingers occupying the space where the train shed used to be. The conceit is that these two long buildings form a "street" by being linked with a covering of a transparent plastic roof. It aims to be a meeting point as well as a venue for fashion shows and other performances in the future.

...
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/lifest...-art-school.do
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 01:53 AM   #2623
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London offices 'ideal European base'

If an international organisation is going to have a presence in Europe, it is likely they will secure London offices.

This is according to the British Council for Offices (BCO), which stated that large, global companies have significant requirements that can sometimes only be met by offices in London.

BCO chief executive Richard Kauntze highlighted corporate space in the centre of the capital as especially meeting the needs of firms.

If organisations are going to trade in Europe, "they are going to be in London and they need a high-quality building and someone who is going to build it for them. They are only going to be in the centre", he claimed.

Mr Kauntze pointed to a number of London City office buildings like the Heron Tower and the in-construction The Shard as providing business space, while there are also developments in Midtown and the West End.

Reuters recently reported that Heron Tower had welcomed four new tenants, one of which was Lithuanian bank Snoras.

The bank - advised by Mellersh & Harding - took around 13,000 sq ft of space on the entire 20th floor at 110 Bishopsgate EC2.
http://www.mellersh.co.uk/News/Londo...800735038.aspx
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 02:14 AM   #2624
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Interesting, to the read The Telegraph or The Guardian you'd think London was imploding. Read this thread and you get the impression it's exploding.
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 04:19 AM   #2625
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It's somewhere in the middle.
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 04:24 AM   #2626
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Originally Posted by tuten View Post
It's somewhere in the middle.
Ah, well, that's booming for most Western cities.
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 08:16 PM   #2627
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Heron Tower Wins More Occupiers Over

Harsh economic winds may be blowing, but for Heron Tower it is continuing to fill up with clients meaning that a total of a third of the space is now either let or under offer. The building, which is the tallest skyscraper in the City of London, was only finished in March 2011 but has now had another four companies sign up for it.

Credit City Capital has taken the 12th floor, Partners Group is moving into the 14th floor, the Chicago Trading Company has plumped for the 16th floor, and Snoras are going for the 20th floor.

Five of the office floors are already rented out to two clients, Landmark Plc who have a serviced office centre on the 17th, 18th and 19th floors, and McDermott, Will & Emery who have the 8th and 9th floors.

These are the two lets which so far bear the closest resemblance to the office village concept that the tower was based around of a series of floors connected by a central space forming a self contained cluster for the occupier in question.

Eagle-eyed readers may have spotted that all the space rented in the tower so far is in the lower half apart from the top floor restaurant, Sushi Samba, which is due to open next year.

One reason for this may be that the marketing of the building could be split into two different campaigns, the first of which is for the bottom half of the tower. This could leave the second half of the tower, the more expensive upper half, to be marketed in a second phase which might be coming sooner than later if they can keep the momentum up.
http://www.skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=2933
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Old September 23rd, 2011, 05:21 PM   #2628
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Originally Posted by SE9 View Post
Woolwich Town Hall (newly complete)

image hosted on flickr



Olympic Shooting and Paralympic Archery venues (under construction)

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The large Woolwich Arsenal development, including Crossrail station (under construction)

image hosted on flickr



Plus other smaller developments.
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Old September 23rd, 2011, 06:51 PM   #2629
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Originally Posted by Dale View Post
Ah, well, that's booming for most Western cities.
It's a lot of booming
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Old September 25th, 2011, 01:31 AM   #2630
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Canary Wharf could double in size

George Iacobescu, chief executive of Canary Wharf Group (CWG), said on Thursday he was "actively looking" for pre-lets at the proposed Heron Quays West development, which covers 1.3m sq ft. His comments come after CWG last month signed up the European Medical Association to occupy the final skyscraper included in the Canary Wharf masterplan of the 1980s.

Mr Iacobescu says Canary Wharf now has 11.8m sq ft of further developments in the pipeline with planning permission, including Heron Quays West, which would more than double the size of the estate. This includes the 4.6m sq ft Wood Wharf mixed-use scheme and a proposed headquarters for JP Morgan. CWG is also constructing a Crossrail station at Canary Wharf, which will open in 2018 and improve transport links. Mr Iacobescu said the schemes are part of a "two-pronged strategy" to expand Canary Wharf and invest in developments outside the estate.

CWG co-owns the proposed "Walkie Talkie" skyscraper at 20 Fenchurch Street in the City, which is "on track" for completion in the second quarter of 2014, according to Mr Iacobescu, and has bought the Shell Centre site on the South Bank with Qatari backing.

Asked if CWG is considering developments outside London, Mr Iacobescu said: "I wouldn't disregard it at all. Every single day we have someone coming to us and saying 'Can you do another Canary Wharf?' We are looking for something like 20 Fenchurch Street and the Shell Centre where we can bring additional value."

Songbird, the listed entity which owns the majority of CWG, said on Thursday that the value of the Canary Wharf estate increased by 1.9pc to £4.7bn in the six months to June 30. This increase led to Songbird posting pre-tax profits of £97.6m, compared with an £11.3m loss last year.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/n...e-in-size.html
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Old September 27th, 2011, 09:06 PM   #2631
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CitizenMs Tower Hill Hotel Set To Rise

Soon to start construction on Tower Hill overlooking the famous fortress, the Tower of London, is a new budget hotel, one of the first to be built in the City of London for decades.

Despite having numerous famous tourist attractions, of which the Tower of London is the most famous, the City of London has established itself almost wholly as a business district and relied on other parts of London to accommodate the tourists which visit it every day.

The CitizenM Hotel is one of a new generation of hotels that see the leisure market expand in the Square Mile after years of stasis. More importantly however it is one of the first that is affordable pitched at what is described as the "budget boutique market"; the few hotels there are in the area tend to be expensive and aimed at business accommodation as seen from the planned overhaul of Ten Trinity Square.

One reason usual hurdle facing hotels in the City is the loss of employment space when an office building faces replacement with another use. In this case however the office market right now is at a low with few new developments starting.

The site to Trinity Place was previously being developed by Greycoat and has planning permission for a 10,000 square metre office building but following the 2008 Credit Crunch these plans were put on a back burner.

The CitizenM Hotel at 38-40 Trinity Square that will eventually contain 370 hotel rooms. It will consist of a basement, ground floor which will include a new café, and eight floors above it with pre-fabricated modular bedrooms that will be built off-site and then fitted into the hotel one at a time to reduce construction time.

Cladding the exterior of the building will be stone rainscreen with metal frames creating a feeling of repetition, plus extensive glazing as each of the bedrooms will have floor to ceiling glazing included. The design however is bland, although some will welcome this due to the proximity it has with the Tower of London which could be overshadowed by something flashy.

Designed by Axis Architects it will open in 2013 and be the second CitizenM hotel in London after one near the Tate Modern in Southwark due to be completed in 2012.
http://www.skyscrapernews.com/news.php?ref=2936
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Old September 28th, 2011, 10:03 PM   #2632
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Google plans ‘East London Tech City’ base

Google is to open a “launchpad” for technology entrepreneurs in a multimillion-pound boost for the government’s “East London Tech City” scheme.

The investment in David Cameron’s growth initiative comes after Twitter’s decision to locate a new office in Dublin raised fresh questions over hopes that US technology groups can help stimulate the UK economy. First announced last November amid a wave of optimism over the “Silicon Roundabout” scene around London’s Old Street and Shoreditch, many entrepreneurs felt the East London Tech City initiative had lost momentum. But Google’s investment ranks among the largest in a fresh flurry of announcements from the likes of Facebook, Amazon.com and Intel.

Google, whose main UK offices are in London’s Victoria, is taking out a long lease on a 25,000 sq ft, seven-storey building in Bonhill Street, which it is planning to refurbish before reopening next year. David Singleton, engineering director at Google UK, said the initiative was a first for the company. “East London is already home to hundreds of innovative British start-ups, and has huge potential for economic growth and new jobs over the coming years,” he said.

Google’s lease, which was advertised for £5m, will run for at least 10 years. The location will be used for speakers, collaborative programming events known as hackathons, training workshops and product demonstrations for engineers.

Rohan Silva, a senior policy adviser to the prime minister, said: “The Google announcement is a great example of how we are using the convening power of government to bring investment to the area. This is addressing a very specific need that the community in east London has made clear to government: the need for more flexible spaces where entrepreneurs, engineers and developers can come together and work on things in an ultra-low-cost way.”

Mr Silva said the second phase of the government’s growth review, which will be published in November, will include a revamp of the school IT curriculum, after Eric Schmidt, Google’s chairman, criticised the UK’s poor technological education system.

Earlier this month, Facebook, BlackBerry-maker RIM, Intel, Cisco and Techlightenment announced a package of new IT training courses for young people in London and around the country.

On Monday, Amazon announced a free weekly “start-up clinic”, hosted in east London, as well as training courses on “cloud computing” for 120 small companies in London and Manchester. Werner Vogels, Amazon’s chief technology officer, said start-up activity in London and across Europe was “100 per cent comparable” with Silicon Valley in terms of the talent and quality of businesses, although there remained disadvantages, such as access to early-stage capital.

As the UK government looks to position London as Europe’s tech capital, it faces tough competition from Dublin, whose lower corporation tax rate has attracted Facebook, Google and this week Twitter to open offices.

Twitter denied reports that Dublin would be its international headquarters and noted that, for now, the sales and operations office would be smaller than its central London and Tokyo sites. “As we continue to expand overseas, we’re constantly evaluating the best structure for the company,” said Twitter. “We looked at different factors including available labour force, proximity to customers, IT infrastructure and related operational expenses when choosing these locations.”
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/3aa3812e-e...#axzz1ZH80DYrZ
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Old September 29th, 2011, 04:57 PM   #2633
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Visitors soar as borough invests £4m in libraries

This is the £14 million Canada Water library, which is due to open at the end of November. The four-storey inverted pyramid will replace Rotherhithe library.



The new centre, built at a time of massive cuts to library services in London, will house 40,000 books, 2,500 films and CDs, a waterside café and a theatre - and offer free wi-fi as well as up to 100 computers.

About 800 books will be labelled with the names of residents who chose them as their favourites for the library, opening seven days a week.

The design features a full-height atrium, grass roof and solar panels and will form the centrepiece of a new town plaza. It was built after the Standard, which is highlighting the cuts crisis with the Save Our Libraries campaign, told how New York library bosses criticised London councils for cutting services.

Southwark councillor Veronica Ward, cabinet member for culture, and leisure, said: "This is set to be a stunning example of what libraries can achieve, as well as being at the heart of a public space that will form part of a buzzing new town centre."

Piers Gough, partner at CZWG, the architects who designed the project, said: "The community will have a lovely place and resources where they can read, learn and be creative."
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standa...n-libraries.do
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Old September 29th, 2011, 05:11 PM   #2634
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Great projects
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Old September 29th, 2011, 08:53 PM   #2635
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259 City Road - Islington

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Old September 30th, 2011, 11:41 PM   #2636
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Old October 1st, 2011, 05:22 PM   #2637
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Pioneer Point

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Old October 2nd, 2011, 03:17 AM   #2638
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$1 Billion US Embassy



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Old October 2nd, 2011, 09:45 AM   #2639
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That building costs a billion dollars? Probably looks like would cost half that amount at the most.
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Old October 2nd, 2011, 07:18 PM   #2640
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Do you realise how much they will be investing in security features? It's the US embassy in London...
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