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Old October 19th, 2011, 11:50 PM   #2801
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I fail to see how this is actually helping old street roundabout?
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Old October 20th, 2011, 04:22 AM   #2802
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Crossrail: Tottenham Court Road station area to get revamp



Four blocks of shops, flats and offices would be built at the eastern end of Oxford Street in central London as part of plans for the new Crossrail network.

The developers have submitted planning applications to revamp the area around Tottenham Court Road station.

A 350-seat theatre would replace the Astoria, which was demolished in 2009 to make way for the £16bn east-west rail line which is set to open in 2018.

The blocks would go up between Charing Cross Road and Great Chapel Street.

The first would be on the corner of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road, opposite Centre Point tower and above the expanded Tottenham Court Road station, where Crossrail will connect with the Tube.

It will consist of a nine-storey office block and three floors of shops.

Airport connection
Another building would be located further south on Charing Cross Road and would house an additional nine floors of offices plus the new theatre.

The two remaining developments would include a total of 92 flats and three floors of shops, which would be accessed from Oxford Street and Dean Street.

The applications will now be considered by Westminster Council, whose planning sub-committee has already approved a planning brief for the theatre.

Further submissions are to be put forward for developments in Holborn, Farringdon, Canning Town and Woolwich.

Crossrail's route will run from Maidenhead in Berkshire to Brentwood in Essex and Abbey Wood in south-east London.

It will also have a spur connecting the line with Heathrow Airport.

Among its stops in central London will be Paddington, Liverpool Street and Canary Wharf stations.



The plans would overhaul the area above Tottenham Court Road, where Crossrail and the Tube meet
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-15356236
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Old October 20th, 2011, 02:48 PM   #2803
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Ikea unveils mixed-use Stratford project



The first large-scale development project in the area around the Olympic park will be unveiled on Thursday in a boost to hopes that the 2012 Games will spark a legacy of widespread regeneration in east London.
Inter Ikea Group, the company that owns the assets of the furniture retailer Ikea, will pour hundreds of millions of pounds into a 26-acre mixed-use project that will spurn high-density planning in favour of well-designed, sustainable family homes just 500m south of the Olympic stadium.

The group’s property development subsidiary, LandProp, will launch a master plan for the scheme, to be called Strand East, on Thursday evening, setting out ambitions for a development of architecturally varied and sustainably built neighbourhoods, along with public spaces, offices, creative workshops and a hotel – but no Ikea store – on what is largely derelict industrial land.
Though smaller developments are planned in the Stratford area, this is the first big, multifaceted development to be announced in the Olympic vicinity since the creation of the Olympic park and the huge Westfield retail centre.
Full article: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/28ea9bf6-f...#axzz1bK0maZdV





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University of Surrey: Gold-standard education



The University of Surrey’s £108m integrated learning centre and languages department, designed by RMJM’s London studio, has been completed

RMJM acted as lead consultant and design architect for the project, which is located at the heart of the university’s main Stag Hill campus in Guildford.

The building, built by Volker Fitzpatrick, has an external facade clad in gold and bronze anodised aluminium, a feature inspired by Guildford’s Saxon name “Gyldeford”, which means “the golden ford”.

RMJM used BIM to develop the four-storey, 4,950m2 building. It will be opened officially in November, but students were able to use it for the first time this month.
http://www.building.co.uk/university...026350.article
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Old October 20th, 2011, 11:21 PM   #2804
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W London, Leicester Square (newly opened 5-star hotel)

image hosted on flickr

pic by david.bank
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Old October 21st, 2011, 01:08 AM   #2805
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Crossrail submits development plans to transform Tottenham Court Road and West End


The arrival of Crossrail will make Tottenham Court Road a major West End transport hub. Photo: Crossrail.

Crossrail has submitted ambitious plans to Westminster City Council for the regeneration of Tottenham Court Road and the east end of Oxford Street, including the former Astoria site.

The plans, submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, propose two above ground developments located over each ticket hall of the integrated Tottenham Court Road station that will serve both Crossrail and London Underground passengers.

The 500,000 sq ft of premium retail, office and residential accommodation will cover four blocks, boosting the economy in the eastern end of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road.

It will also deliver a significant contribution towards the Crossrail funding package.

A new theatre to replace the former Astoria Theatre is proposed. Derwent London has entered into an agreement with Nimax who will operate a new 350 seat theatre.

London Underground and Crossrail have also proposed detailed plans to renew and upgrade the public spaces around the eastern ticket hall and St Giles area.

A new open pedestrian space linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road will create new views of the Square and of St. Patrick’s Church.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said:

“The east end of Oxford Street has long deserved the economic boost, improved public space and glamour these plans will deliver.

“It will be a gleaming example of the opportunities that will follow the route of this new line, as well as offering the facility to zoom from one side of London to the other at record speed.”

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail Land and Property Director said:

“These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination.

“The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.

“Crossrail will be submitting further above ground development planning applications for other station sites in central London over the coming months including at Bond Street and Farringdon.

“This will help us to make the most of the development and regeneration opportunities Crossrail is bringing to London.”

The proposals link into wider efforts by London Underground, Crossrail, Transport for London (TfL), Camden Council, Westminster City Council and Design for London to improve the area around St Giles Circus.

A new public piazza will also be created providing a distinctive new landmark for the West End.

The arrival of Crossrail will make Tottenham Court Road a ‘major West End transport hub’. 150,000 passengers use Tottenham Court Road station every day.

That number is expected to rise to more than 200,000 when Crossrail services commence in 2018.

Crossrail will link the West End to Canary Wharf in 12 minutes, Stratford in 13 minutes and Heathrow in less than 30 minutes.

In total, £1bn is being spent to build the new Crossrail station and upgrade the capacity of the Tube station.

The private sector-funded over-site developments will be built once work to construct Tottenham Court Road station is complete in 2017. Crossrail will commence services in 2018.
http://www.rail.co/2011/10/20/crossr...-and-west-end/
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Old October 21st, 2011, 03:06 PM   #2806
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Plans for new housing development announced

A vision for a major development in Stratford featuring over a thousand new homes as well as offices and community facilities has been unveiled.

Strand East, which is being put together by LandProp, will be based near the Olympic Park and will also include a 350 bedroom hotel.

An agreement has been reached with the Olympic Park Legacy Company and a planning application for the 26 acre site is expected to be put to the London Thames Gateway Development Corporation by early next year.

Managing director of LandProp, which is part of the Ikea group, Harald Müller said: "The completion of the land sale agreement with the OPLC allows us to turn this vision into reality and we will now be engaging in public consultation as we develop the plans further.

"I will shortly be announcing an agreement with an internationally renowned hotel operator to run a high quality 350 bedroom hotel. Graysons will create a wonderful new restaurant overlooking the public square and sculpture at Dane's Yard.

"We have the highest ambitions for Strand East, the development will be on a human scale with much of the site characterised by low density town houses and mews homes connect by beautiful public spaces consisting of courtyards and squares, making the most of the waterways which surround the site."

Strand East will be situated between Stratford High Street, the Three Mills Wall River and the River Lea waterways.

A total of 1,200 homes are planned for the site, with 40 per cent of them having three bedrooms.
http://www.wharf.co.uk/2011/10/plans...-developm.html
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Old October 21st, 2011, 07:37 PM   #2807
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Cities stand or fall on mediocrity
21 October 2011
By Owen Hatherley

It’s a truism that in any era the majority of architecture is not very good — uncomfortable though this may be in an age when preserved back-to-backs in Leeds excite the praise of Simon Jenkins and every dilapidated Georgian street has a preservation order and a practically criminal price tag slapped on it.

Every generation, however, manages to get very angry about its own standard of not-very-goodness. In the 1930s critics could hardly bear to look at the “bypass Tudor” that ribboned its way across south-east England; in the 1960s system-built towers caused the same ire. Now the slatted wood ‘n’ barcode facade style is our standard of not-very-good, although many have spent the last two decades trying to pretend it was iconic, vibrant and able to single-handedly transform the fortunes of post-industrial cities.

There are however two quite distinct types of not-very-good, and here things get complicated. The reason why the most mediocre speculative Georgian/ Regency terraces of north London are so obsessed over is partly because the standard of mediocrity had certain virtues. Some of these were negative virtues in comparison with what came before (wooden shacks) and after (Victoriana). It was mediocrity, but coherent mediocrity, well-proportioned mediocrity, a mediocrity that had some notion of urbanity, mediocrity with nice high windows, at least for those who weren’t servants. It came with some notion of what a city was - a dense, urban entity where some sort of standard was necessary. This doesn’t make the average stucco and brick block in Holloway worthy of outrageous sums, but it means it isn’t completely valueless.

A similar argument could be made about the equally speculative tenements of Glasgow and Edinburgh, which still provide some of the most memorable and consistent urban townscapes in the UK. Municipal flats in London, Coventry, Sheffield and elsewhere also had a general standard of worthwhile mediocrity.

We are however quite clearly in a period of much less worthwhile mediocrity. The reason for this, put simply, is mediocrity in denial. Every fifth-rate block of flats thinks of itself as a little icon. All the stylistic devices — the barcodes, the patterns, the mix of materials — are designed as subterfuge, ways of masking bulk, unintentionally funny, conformist attempts at individualism and shouting down the neighbours.

That’s what lies behind the curious hostility that emerges whenever British eyes light on an example of rectilinear, blank, well-detailed, slightly boring north European architecture. The same words always come out — so bleak, so totalitarian. Fenestration that isn’t staggered or patterned inspires terror. The unspoken assumption is that the townscape of contemporary Britain, with its blaring colours, tacked-on bits and bobs and general crapness is somehow more humane and “vibrant”. But architectural celebrity notwithstanding, cities are defined by how good their boring buildings are; how interesting their standard of mediocrity is.
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Old October 21st, 2011, 09:52 PM   #2808
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High hopes for £200m Dickens Yard in the heart of Ealing

Dickens Yard promises to inject much needed investment back into the town centre with luxury and style at its core.




But while its 698 apartments start at a hefty £300,000 for a bijoux one-bed and pent-houses already selling at £1.3million a pop, what does this extravagance mean for the rest of Ealing?

Our reporter, Poppy Bradbury, goes on site to find out.

As I arrive at the new marketing suite in the Broadway, where three display homes are fitted to the highest specifications, to meet my host, he is already buzzing with excitement.

Ian Dobie, managing director of St George's west London portfolio, thinks Dickens Yard represents a bright future at the heart of the borough.

"Ealing is one of the safest and greenest boroughs in London but less than half an hour from central London. With Crossrail coming in 2017 and the tube connections, that's why it's so popular.

"Ealing's got a great history and reputation, and as close to Twickenham, the home of English rugby, as Wembley, the home of English football."

He tells me this £200m project is the biggest single investment Ealing has ever seen, and careful thought by architect John Thompson has gone into preserving Ealing's heritage.

"We're looking for that village feel," he said. "We want to be part of London and part of the local community."

The Grade II listed Town Hall, the locally listed Old Fire Station quietly tucked away in Longfield Avenue, and Sir Gilbert Scott's 1852 Christ the Saviour Church, are the historical cornerstones of this glittering new community.

With 100,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space stretching along a newly carved Market Street, which will lead from the church square to a public piazza, it is hoped this will become a bustling and inviting space for its new homeowners as well as shoppers.

After a short lecture on safety, suited and booted with steel-capped boots, a high-visibility jacket and hard hat, I follow Ian and his burly team through the maze of lorries where the workers are digging.

The gaping hole will house an energy centre to power the entire yard and the underground parking will include 300 public spaces.

Rising statically in its bare, concrete glory we scale the eight floors to the top of the duly named Belgravia tower to find a breathtaking view stretching right out across London.

The BT Tower and Southwark's new Shard are clearly visible on the hazy skyline, and to the north a quintessential view of Ealing marking her quite rightly as Queen of the Suburbs, with Ealing Abbey perched high above the canopy of bushy tree tops over Pitshanger.

The first tenants are due to move in by autumn next year while the next phase beings to emerge through the cranes and scaffolding.

Building work will continue for another four years, but Ian assures me St George is working closely with the neighbouring primary school and the council to make it as bearable as possible.

Double glazed windows have been installed, while site managers visited in spring to talk to pupils about the project and job opportunities in the construction business - something Ian, who started as an apprentice before taking a degree in structural engineering, is keen to promote.

A Christmas carol at the church and plans to celebrate Ealing Studios' 80th anniversary are signs that Dickens Yard genuinely hopes to become part of the local community. "We believe in quality of the public realm."
http://ealing.ealinggazette.co.uk/20...ickens-ya.html
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Old October 21st, 2011, 11:12 PM   #2809
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Major development project announced for Liverpool Street premises



A joint venture partnership has been announced for a major office development project in Central London.

AXA Real Estate Investment Managers, MGPA and Eurohypo are set to engage in a joint partnership to develop 6 Bevis Marks, a major new 160,000 sq. ft office development situated between Liverpool Street and Aldgate in the heart of the city.

Construction is expected to commence at the beginning of 2012. The scheme will eventually comprise 160,000 sq. ft of Grade A office space, together with 12,000 sq. ft of retail space at ground floor level.

The development is expected to be completed by the autumn of 2013 and will benefit from close proximity to the transport infrastructure at Liverpool Street, where a new Crossrail terminus will be open in 2017.

AXA Real Estate and MGPA have acquired the site on a 50:50 basis. Eurohypo, lenders to the previous site owners, will provide development funding towards the expected £115 million total property development cost.

AXA Real Estate's Opportunities Fund II, which invests in high potential real estate assets, debt and equity, will have completed its investment phase by the project completion. MGPA's investment, meanwhile, has been made on behalf of its Europe Fund III, a private equity fund with equity commitments of €841.5 million that holds residential office and retail assets in five countries across Europe.

AXA Real Estate is an AXA Investment Managers Company, and is within a group declaring assets worth €79 billion. MGPA manage approx. $11 billion in assets across Europe and Asia.
http://www.commercialfinancegroup.co...treet-premises
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Old October 21st, 2011, 11:29 PM   #2810
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Originally Posted by SO143 View Post
My grandmum was born in Ealing!
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Old October 22nd, 2011, 03:03 PM   #2811
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Luxury homes boom in London's downtown

St. James's and nearby Mayfair are the London districts with Europe's biggest concentration of hedge funds. The square was built in the 1660s by Henry Jermyn, an adviser to the royal family, after he was granted land there by King Charles II. It's now home to the 162-year-old East India Club and the headquarters of BP Plc and Rio Tinto Group Plc, the world's second-largest mining company.

An office building on the London square with the world's most expensive commercial rents will be converted into a nine-bedroom mansion, as demand from international buyers drives luxury-home values to record highs.

No. 7 St. James's Square, designed as a house more than a century ago then converted to offices, could sell for more than £50 million ($78 million Cdn) after its renovation, according to Richard Barber, a partner at prime real estate broker W.A. Ellis LLP. The building's owner, Dublin-based Green Property Ltd., plans to spend about 14 million pounds to convert No. 7, adding amenities such as a garden, swimming pool and spa.
Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/busines...#ixzz1bVl5xf5O
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Old October 22nd, 2011, 05:50 PM   #2812
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Kier has been awarded the contract to construct the £42m Arthouse at the 67-acre King’s Cross development in London.



The scheme comprises 143 high quality one, two, three and four-bed residential units (including 29 Registered Social Landlord units) over eight floors. The building also includes commercial units at street level and 37 basement parking spaces.

Arthouse is located on York Way, beside the Regent’s Canal, and will be part of the brand new postcode, London N1C.

The project will start on site in October 2011 and be completed in the final quarter of 2013.

This project follows on from the completion of the T1 Energy Centre by Kier at the King’s Cross development and will run concurrently with other projects presently being undertaken by Kier at the development site.

King’s Cross is being developed by the King's Cross Central Limited Partnership, which brings together Argent Group, London & Continental Railways and DHL Supply Chain.
http://www.theconstructionindex.co.u...rthouse-scheme
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Old October 23rd, 2011, 03:45 PM   #2813
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The new hotel at L.Square looks terrific!
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Old October 23rd, 2011, 06:57 PM   #2814
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Berkeley buys London Beetham Tower



One Blackfriars on south bank of Thames plucked from administration


Tony Pidgley’s Berkeley Group has bought another slice of London’s south bank after exchanging contracts for the so-called Beetham Tower on Blackfriars Road, taking it out of administration.

Berkeley’s St George subsidiary has bought the site of the proposed 52-storey tower at One Blackfriars, which was formerly owned by Liverpool-based entrepreneur Stephen Beetham and Russian company Mirax, before the site was placed into administration by a consortium of lenders that included the Royal Bank of Scotland last October.

Berkeley is understood to have exchanged contracts to buy the site on Wednesday, and is expected to bring forward the original Ian Simpson-designed scheme, for which there is already a planning consent.

It is likely to tweak the design with the inclusion of characteristic Berkeley touches, such as spa facilities, but no overhaul will take place.

The deal comes despite Essential Land, a development company founded by four ex-Oracle Group directors, having become preferred bidder for the site at the beginning of September.

Property Week understands that exclusive talks broke down when the company was unable to find full funding to buy the site.

All parties declined to comment on price, but the site is believed to be worth up to £85m and has a potential gross development value of £700m. It has consent for 64 luxury flats and a 261-bedroom hotel.

Peter Burns of selling agent CBRE Group said: “This is a great opportunity to develop a new landmark tower in an exciting and vibrant part of London.”

Berkeley has a reputation for never overpaying for sites, despite the unprecedented number of developers and investors looking to do residential schemes in London.

It already has several schemes on the south bank of the Thames, among them River Light, which is the first residential scheme to have broken ground in Wandsworth’s gigantic Nine Elms Opportunity Area, as well as famous completed schemes such as St George Wharf.

One Blackfriars collapsed into administration after Beetham and partner Mirax were unable to renegotiate £60m of debt secured against the project.

Administrator BDO was appointed to the 1.4 acre freehold site in October 2010, and it was put up for sale through CBRE during the summer.

Other shortlisted bidders for the site included Stanhope, Irvine Sellar and a joint venture between Godfrey Bradman and British Land. All are believed to have been attracted by an area of London’s south bank that is ripe for regeneration.

It is close to Grosvenor and Native Land’s NEO Bankside and Great Portland Estates’ 240 Blackfriars Road proposals, as well as the King’s Reach Tower residential scheme, for which site owner CIT recently secured residential and office-led planning consent.
http://m.propertyweek.com/news/berke...026546.article
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Old October 24th, 2011, 09:28 PM   #2815
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London 2012: Guildford to spend £240,000 on events

A council in Surrey has revealed it is to spend £240,000 on "landmark events" to mark the London 2012 Olympic Games and the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

Guildford Borough Council said it was planning an exciting programme of events to "inspire future generations".

Councillor Jen Powell said Guildford would be at the heart of the "iconic sporting and cultural events in 2012".

She said it was looking forward to welcoming the Olympic Torch Relay and hosting the Olympic Cycle Road Races.

The Guildford leg of the relay, a week before the Games begin, is the final stop before the torch enters London.

It will be celebrated with an evening event in Stoke Park on 20 July 2012.

The cycle races will pass through the eastern side of the borough on 28 and 29 July.

The council said it would also host and help support community events for the Diamond Jubilee celebrations across the borough, including plans to dress Guildford High Street to mark the occasion in June.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-surrey-15421273




Quote:
Common tower streamlines London's St George's Tower construction



UK based CAS (Construction Access Systems) and The University of Southampton RIFI (Research Institute for Industry) have developed a common mast to accommodate more than one manufacturer's mast climbing products.

It is a low profile, common tower system designed to speed up construction and save costs on construction work up to 70 storeys - 300m high. The first system is being used on London's 51 storey St George's Tower projects.

Manufactured from aluminium alloy to minimise weight, and fully stress tested by RIFI, the CAS common tower has a 5m by 5m footprint yet is capable of running multiple hoists simultaneously. This allows all material and personnel hoists to be concentrated in one area, which streamlines loading efficiency at ground level. With all hoists operating simultaneously it minimises waiting times for men and materials, especially at peak times.

CAS says that using the latest Alimak Scando 650 FCS 100m/minute high speed hoists will reduce full height transit time on St George's Tower to just 90 seconds compared to over 4 minutes using standard hoists. The common tower also accommodates a 3m by 4.6m 'Mammoth' hoist with a payload of 5500kg

As only the common tower, and not the hoists, are tied directly into the building, it means external cladding can be applied to the whole building during construction with the exception of the 4.5 metre access openings at each level. As a result there are far fewer panels to replace at the end of the project, which dramatically speeds up de-rigging.

CAS's managing director Tony Faulkner said, "The savings in time that our common tower creates are a real boost to efficiency during the construction phase. In addition, our common towers are far quicker to install and remove than conventional hoist systems, so there are major savings at the start and end of the project as well. High rise developments are becoming more common in city centres throughout Europe, and with construction costs continually rising, using our common tower in conjunction with high speed high capacity hoists makes so much sense for these major projects."
http://www.khl.com/magazines/access-...-construction/
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Old October 26th, 2011, 05:13 AM   #2816
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Crossrail bids for new offices and flats in Tottenham Court Road



A NINE-storey block will tower over Soho Square if plans submitted to the council as part of the Crossrail development at Tottenham Court Road get the green light.

A new theatre would also be built on the site in Charing Cross Road where legendary music venue the Astoria once stood.

Crossrail said the plans, which involve retail, office and residential units and were submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, will help revive a neglected part of Oxford Street, but others have criticised the scheme.

Soho resident Alida Baxter, who represents neighbours in Dufours Place, said the scale of the proposed buildings was “appalling” and added: “Crossrail have put people out of business. They have a total disregard for the people who live here.”

And music producer Henry Scott-Irvine, who has campaigned against the loss of the West End’s musical heritage, questioned why a theatre was being built instead of a replacement music venue.

He said: “As they have taken away the only rock venue in the West End you would think that they would replace it. The West End is becoming like a shopping mall. In the Astoria you could listen to rock music and if you spilt your beer on the floor it wouldn’t matter. I doubt that will be the case in a theatre.”

Senior Soho community figures have also privately expressed concern, saying they fear the new buildings may block out light to Soho Square.

But a Crossrail spokes*woman said the public would benefit from a new open “pedestrian space” linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road and opening up views of create new views of the square and St Patrick’s Church.

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail’s land and property director, said: “These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination.

“The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.”

The scheme has also been supported by Mayor of London Boris Johnson.

Crossrail is set to open in 2018.

Business group First London said this week that London needed to “start planning” for Crossrail 2, another rail link billed as a successor of the multi-billion pound scheme.A NINE-storey block will tower over Soho Square if plans submitted to the council as part of the Crossrail development at Tottenham Court Road get the green light.

A new theatre would also be built on the site in Charing Cross Road where legendary music venue the Astoria once stood.

Crossrail said the plans, which involve retail, office and residential units and were submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, will help revive a neglected part of Oxford Street, but others have criticised the scheme.

Soho resident Alida Baxter, who represents neighbours in Dufours Place, said the scale of the proposed buildings was “appalling” and added: “Crossrail have put people out of business. They have a total disregard for the people who live here.”

And music producer Henry Scott-Irvine, who has campaigned against the loss of the West End’s musical heritage, questioned why a theatre was being built instead of a replacement music venue.

He said: “As they have taken away the only rock venue in the West End you would think that they would replace it. The West End is becoming like a shopping mall. In the Astoria you could listen to rock music and if you spilt your beer on the floor it wouldn’t matter. I doubt that will be the case in a theatre.”

Senior Soho community figures have also privately expressed concern, saying they fear the new buildings may block out light to Soho Square.

But a Crossrail spokes*woman said the public would benefit from a new open “pedestrian space” linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road and opening up views of create new views of the square and St Patrick’s Church.

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail’s land and property director, said: “These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination.

“The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.”

The scheme has also been supported by Mayor of London Boris Johnson.

Crossrail is set to open in 2018.

Business group First London said this week that London needed to “start planning” for Crossrail 2, another rail link billed as a successor of the multi-billion pound scheme.A NINE-storey block will tower over Soho Square if plans submitted to the council as part of the Crossrail development at Tottenham Court Road get the green light.

A new theatre would also be built on the site in Charing Cross Road where legendary music venue the Astoria once stood.

Crossrail said the plans, which involve retail, office and residential units and were submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, will help revive a neglected part of Oxford Street, but others have criticised the scheme.

Soho resident Alida Baxter, who represents neighbours in Dufours Place, said the scale of the proposed buildings was “appalling” and added: “Crossrail have put people out of business. They have a total disregard for the people who live here.”

And music producer Henry Scott-Irvine, who has campaigned against the loss of the West End’s musical heritage, questioned why a theatre was being built instead of a replacement music venue.

He said: “As they have taken away the only rock venue in the West End you would think that they would replace it. The West End is becoming like a shopping mall. In the Astoria you could listen to rock music and if you spilt your beer on the floor it wouldn’t matter. I doubt that will be the case in a theatre.”

Senior Soho community figures have also privately expressed concern, saying they fear the new buildings may block out light to Soho Square.

But a Crossrail spokes*woman said the public would benefit from a new open “pedestrian space” linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road and opening up views of create new views of the square and St Patrick’s Church.

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail’s land and property director, said: “These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination.

“The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.”

The scheme has also been supported by Mayor of London Boris Johnson.

Crossrail is set to open in 2018.

Business group First London said this week that London needed to “start planning” for Crossrail 2, another rail link billed as a successor of the multi-billion pound scheme.A NINE-storey block will tower over Soho Square if plans submitted to the council as part of the Crossrail development at Tottenham Court Road get the green light.

A new theatre would also be built on the site in Charing Cross Road where legendary music venue the Astoria once stood.

Crossrail said the plans, which involve retail, office and residential units and were submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, will help revive a neglected part of Oxford Street, but others have criticised the scheme.

Soho resident Alida Baxter, who represents neighbours in Dufours Place, said the scale of the proposed buildings was “appalling” and added: “Crossrail have put people out of business. They have a total disregard for the people who live here.”

And music producer Henry Scott-Irvine, who has campaigned against the loss of the West End’s musical heritage, questioned why a theatre was being built instead of a replacement music venue.

He said: “As they have taken away the only rock venue in the West End you would think that they would replace it. The West End is becoming like a shopping mall. In the Astoria you could listen to rock music and if you spilt your beer on the floor it wouldn’t matter. I doubt that will be the case in a theatre.”

Senior Soho community figures have also privately expressed concern, saying they fear the new buildings may block out light to Soho Square.

But a Crossrail spokes*woman said the public would benefit from a new open “pedestrian space” linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road and opening up views of create new views of the square and St Patrick’s Church.

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail’s land and property director, said: “These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination.

“The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.”

The scheme has also been supported by Mayor of London Boris Johnson.

Crossrail is set to open in 2018.

Business group First London said this week that London needed to “start planning” for Crossrail 2, another rail link billed as a successor of the multi-billion pound scheme.

http://www.westendextra.com/news/201...ham-court-road
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Old October 26th, 2011, 05:25 AM   #2817
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Originally Posted by SO143 View Post
Berkeley buys London Beetham Tower
I am so happy to see that this tower is still in the spot light and didn't just become yet another proposal. I really love the shape of the building and hopefully construction will start soon
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Old October 26th, 2011, 06:00 PM   #2818
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulpia-Serdica View Post
I am so happy to see that this tower is still in the spot light and didn't just become yet another proposal. I really love the shape of the building and hopefully construction will start soon
This is not a proposal, this tower is already approved. But, the construction hasn't stated yet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beetham_Tower,_London

I guess it will be used as a hotel and some residential purposes, it will provide 49 floors.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 08:38 PM   #2819
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Here is something interesting

Quote:
The Crystal: Siemens' sustainability hub to launch in London



Siemens has completed the first major stage of construction on a centre of sustainability in Royal Victoria Docks, London.

The £30 million Siemens Centre for Urban Sustainability -- also known as the Crystal -- will be one of the capital's greenest buildings and will act as a think tank where engineers and city experts will collaborate on projects that drive sustainable urban innovation.



The building consists of two crystal-shaped sections will cover an area of 3,687 metres squared. One section will be dedicated loosely to corporate activities, complete with 180 desks for Siemens R&D teams and collaborators and a 300-seat auditorium for events and seminars. The second section will house a public exhibition space that will showcase best practice in urban planning and design.

The entire development has been designed to "walk the talk", showcasing the best sustainable technology available. It is an "all electric" building, which operates free from fossil fuels, thanks to a large number of solar panels on the roof. Battery storage will ensure that any excess energy generated doesn't go to waste.

The entire building will be fitted with sensors linked to a building management system that will adjust the heat, light and ventilation in the building automatically to conserve as much energy as possible. Every kilowatt of electricity used for heat and cooling and ever litre of water consumed or generated will be measured and made accessible via easy-to-read dashboards around the building.

For most of the building's spaces, artificial light won't be needed at all in during the day thanks to the large amounts of glass used in the design. LED lighting will be used and controlled where necessary. The building will be ventilated naturally using motorised vents in the roof and façade. Air conditioning is taken from a ground source heat pump. On hot days, it takes heat from the building and puts it back into the ground to keep it cool.

The Crystal will also harvest rainwater and convert it into drinking water. A black water recycling plant will ensure that all of the water used in the building including toilet water will be recycled.

The development forms part of the Mayor's Green Enterprise District that aims to attract low carbon investment and create green collar jobs to make London a leading centre of environmental goods, services and skills.

Boris Johnson, Mayor of London said at a "topping-out" ceremony for the development this week: "In the same way the wharves and warehouses of East London led the capital's global dominance of the industrial age, so I want this area to be economically vibrant in the 21st century. As part of this vision, we are working to attract the best new high tech industries and environmental businesses to the capital bringing investment and jobs to Londoners. Siemens' Crystal is a perfect platform to help kick-start this regeneration demonstrating the type of dynamic partnership I want London to forge with global innovators in order to create the best big city in the world."

The Crystal is scheduled to open for business in June 2012.
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/...sustainability
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Old October 26th, 2011, 11:27 PM   #2820
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Newly built Barking Learning Centre in East London

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rogersg...n/photostream/
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