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Old March 28th, 2012, 06:13 PM   #3401
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St. Modwen and Vinci win $3.2 billion London market deal

(Reuters) - British property developer St. Modwen (SMP.L) and French group Vinci (SGEF.PA) have won a 2 billion-pound ($3.2 billion) project to redevelop London's New Covent Garden flower and vegetable market and add 2,800 homes near the site of the future U.S. embassy.

The partnership beat a rival bid from French conglomerate Bouygues (BOUY.PA) and American private equity firm Carlyle Group (CG.O), the winning bidders said in a statement on Tuesday.

Construction of the 500,000 square foot market in the Nine Elms district on the south side of the River Thames will begin next year. Nine Elms also contains Battersea power station, the 38-acre landmark site currently up for sale after suffering repeated failed redevelopment attempts over the last three decades.

Nine Elms is one of a record number of large regeneration projects underway in London as growing numbers of developers create new neighborhoods under schemes drawn up in the boom years prior to the financial crisis.
http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/0...82Q0D020120327
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Old March 28th, 2012, 07:10 PM   #3402
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Selfridges named as world's best store

Selfridges has beaten Bloomingdale's in New York to be named the best department store in the world.



The London flagship store, famed for its lavish window displays, was only the second to win the award after Saks Fifth Avenue was given the inaugural prize two years ago.

The award, conferred at the Global Department Store Summit in New York, was determined by executives and industry experts from a field that included the world's biggest department stores.

Paul Kelly, Vice Chairman of Selfridges, said: "We are delighted to have won this very special award and very proud of our teams who have all contributed in making this happen.

"This is very much in recognition of all their hard work. This centenary-old brand, built on the most extraordinary heritage, confirms that Selfridges is the most relevant and exciting department store today."

The prize was given on behalf of the Intercontinental Group of Department Stores, the world's largest department store association, and the International Association of Department Stores.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/n...ent-store.html

Last edited by SO143; March 28th, 2012 at 07:34 PM.
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Old March 28th, 2012, 07:24 PM   #3403
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London 'leads world in commercial law cases'

Capital's legal and financial expertise is unrivalled, say ministers, with 90% of cases having international link

Nine out of 10 commercial cases handled by London law firms now have an international link, according to government figures.

The Ministry of Justice said a new high court building in London was the largest "specialist centre" in the world for the resolution of commercial disputes. Ministers say London's concentration of legal and financial expertise is unrivalled.

A ministry spokesman said: "More international and commercial arbitrations take place in London under English law than in any other city in the world."

The Rolls building, in central London, was formally opened by the Queen in December. Officials said it was created by a private developer and is rented by the government at a cost of more than £10m a year.

The ministry said the building housed all the specialist courts of the chancery division of the high court – including the admiralty, commercial and technology.



CNN
Quote:
London taxis voted best in the world

World travelers consider London cabs the best in the world, despite recognizing that they’re also the priciest, a new survey finds.

In a Hotels.com survey conducted internationally among some 5,000 travelers, an overwhelming 28 percent picked the roomy London black cab as their favorite.

Coming in second are New York’s yellow cabs, which won the hearts of 9 percent of all respondents, while Hong Kong’s red taxis, at 7 percent, took third place.

Tokyo and Singapore round up the top five.

Superlative quality comes with a superlative price tag, however. The world’s favorite cab is also considered the world’s most expensive, snatching 20 percent of the votes in the pricey category. A six-kilometer, 16-30 minute cab ride in London can cost up to £26 (approximately US$42) at night on public holidays.

The cheapest? Thailand’s tuk-tuks, although they are also voted worst in the world for quality of driving (32 percent), cleanliness (22 percent) and safety (36 percent).

More on CNNGo: Gallery: Bangkok tuk-tuk driver confessions

Cabs in the Big Apple are perceived as the most readily available, although travelers also noted that their drivers are the most clueless about their area of work.

Argentineans are the worst tippers, with 34 percent admitting to never tipping their taxi drivers.

Hong Kongers are the world’s most generous, with 80 percent of passengers tipping by rounding up the fare.

We're not surprised, considering how most Hong Kong cab drivers routinely keep their passengers' small change without asking.

Results also show that Koreans and Germans are the most easily annoyed by small talk, with around a third of them picking “chatty drivers” as their crowning pet peeve.

Also read 10 greatest taxis of the world.

The world’s favorite taxis:

1. London: 28 percent

2. New York: 9 percent

3. Hong Kong: 7 percent

4. Tokyo: 7 percent

5. Singapore: 6 percent

6. Bangkok: 6 percent

7. Berlin: 4 percent

8. Helsinki: 4 percent

9. Dublin: 4 percent

10. Madrid: 4 percent
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Old March 28th, 2012, 07:32 PM   #3404
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I love Selfridges.
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Old March 28th, 2012, 07:35 PM   #3405
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Little Titchfield Development





Marylebone redevelopment





Harrow campus redevelopment





Building a Better University - University of Westminster

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Old March 28th, 2012, 08:35 PM   #3406
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Boris, Ken And The London Skyline



That Boris Johnson and Ken Livingstone are on opposite sides on the issue of whether a skyscraper should be built is of little note. What might be a surprise, particularly to those who followed the 2008 campaign, is which side they’re taking.

The building in question is a 41-storey residential tower at Elephant & Castle. Construction of the skyscraper would imperil the nearby Ministry of Sound nightclub. Despite a noisy campaign by the MoS, and a ruling by Southwark Council rejecting it, Boris Johnson has taken on the decision for himself, with the suspicion being that he’ll approve it (in the previous four cases in which the Mayor has overruled the local council, it has been to green-light the scheme). A final decision is expected on March 12th. Ken Livingstone is campaigning against it, as is Brian Paddick.

But how did it come to this? After all, isn’t Ken the skyscraper king, and Boris their foe?

Things seemed much simpler back in 2008. On the campaign trail Boris Johnson was broadly opposed to tall buildings in London. One of his first appointments at City Hall was the late Simon Milton, widely regarded as a man disinclined toward skyscrapers. Early on the new mayor decided to widen the city’s viewing corridors, which protect key views of historic London landmarks from certain vantage points; they had been shrunk under Ken Livingstone, who made no secret of his skyscraper love. Early in Boris’ tenure the mood was that London’s early 21st-century clutch of new skyscrapers would be a brief experiment, and that the city’s skyline wouldn’t be unduly ruffled again. The Evening Standard even published a list of 14 projects that Boris was likely to axe.

However, events have not panned out the way the ‘scraper-phobes might have hoped. Many of the buildings on the Standard’s list have indeed been halted, but this is more down to the tough economic headwinds than anything the Mayor has done. One of the more controversial schemes, the ‘penny-whistle’ in Ealing, even received Boris’ stamp of approval, only to be overturned by the government. Some of the more conspicuous new presences on London’s skyline, most notably the Shard and the Heron, were approved before Boris’ term of office and have gone ahead as planned, while others, such as the currently-stalled Pinnacle, the Cheesegrater and the Walkie-Talkie tower, are at various stages of erection after credit crunch-mandated delays. Yet Boris has overruled local councils and approved other skyscrapers, such as the Columbus tower in Canary Wharf, and, as we’ll shortly find out, perhaps at Elephant and Castle too.

These are hardly the actions of a man opposed to tall buildings. Despite early prevaricating Boris has proved largely as enthusiastic toward skyscrapers as his predecessor, a point reinforced in a recent Standard jeremiad by Simon Jenkins, who blasted the “phallic obsession” of both men (as a side note, he’s not the only one to read sexual metaphors in built environment: Alain de Botton opined last year that the Shard was a “giant penis”).

The shape of London’s skyline has been little discussed by either campaign thus far; a reflection, perhaps, that both candidates share a similar, pragmatic view towards the issue. The caricatures offered last time round were untrue: Ken wasn’t about to turn London into a vision of Dubai-on-Thames, and Boris was never going to freeze every tall development and throw money at Quinlan Terry. We’ll see whether the realities of governing a world city that needs to balance the traditional with the modern has cost the Mayor at the ballot box come May.
http://londonist.com/2012/03/boris-k...on-skyline.php
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Old March 28th, 2012, 11:32 PM   #3407
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If the Ministry of Sound is in danger because of it, then do not build it! That club is a global institution and world famous!
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Old March 29th, 2012, 10:53 AM   #3408
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London and New York 'to remain world's top cities'
28 March 2012

London and New York will remain the most important world cities for wealthy individuals over the next decade, research suggests.

However, Beijing and Shanghai are seen by high-net-worth individuals as the most important up-and-coming cities, according to the Wealth Report compiled by Knight Frank and Citi Private Bank.

The research also notes the "relentless shift" in wealth towards Asia Pacific.

It forecast the number of people worth $100m (£63m) would grow by 40% by 2016.

London ranked top in three of the four categories on which the world's cities were judged in the report - quality of life, knowledge and influence, and economic power.

Washington came top in the final category of political power, with London second.

Monaco remains the most expensive residential location, with one square metre worth on average $58,300, followed by Cap Ferrat, London and Hong Kong.

"This year's Wealth Report contains even more evidence that the world's wealthy are weathering the economic slowdown better than the wider population," said its editor Andrew Shirley.

The survey represents the opinions of more than 4,000 individuals worth on average more than $100m.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17544621






Quote:
London, New York Top Cities for Wealthy: Report
Published: Wednesday, 28 Mar 2012



London and New York are still the most important cities for the super-rich despite stiff competition from the emerging economies, a report into attitudes of the wealthy has revealed.

The Wealth Report 2012 produced by Knight Frank and Citi Private Bank, which canvasses high net-worth individuals’ (HNWI) attitudes and pulls together data on wealth in key cities, suggests that the combination of quality of life, knowledge and influence and economic activity are the key factors the ultra-wealthy look for.

London took pole position in almost every category as the city that mattered most, with New York second; the report suggested these positions would remain unchanged for the next decade.

Socio-political stability was also seen as significant to high net-worth individuals, given the turbulence in some parts of the globe, as well as personal safety and security, excellent education – the U.S and the UK are home to the leading universities in the world - and luxury housing.

As instability has been the mainstay in some regions over the last twelve months money has flooded into what are perceived as “safer” assets.

London’s prime property market has always had an international flavor with the ease of the English language encouraging foreign buyers.

“This year’s wealth report contains even more evidence that the world’s wealthy are weathering the economic slowdown better than the wider population and nowhere is this better reflected than in prime property markets,” Andrew Shirley, editor of The Wealth Report said.

A new world order has often been mooted as emerging economies continue to make significant economic and social strides.

Talking to CNBC, David Murrin, chief executive officer at Emergent Asset Management, said last year that the Western world was finished financially with an unchangeable power shift from the West to the East taking place.

This is supported somewhat by the shift in economic wealth being generated outside the traditional Western hotspots and a burgeoning middle class in these countries keen to tap into the material and consumer wealth that come with it.

Luxury brands have boomed as demand was driven up in the last couple of years.

Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong and Shanghai have undergone extensive economic transformations but are still hampered by a notion that freedom, democracy and a fair and transparent judicial system are lacking, according to the report.

All of the above did however manage to knock Paris down to seventh place.

“Wealthy individuals and families, especially those originating from Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia have become extraordinarily global in nature. Many seek the rule of law and stability that make the UK a top investment choice for investment. The global wealthy have confidently focused their interest on London and the wealth preservation it can afford,” said Luigi Pigorini, CEO Citi Private Bank EMEA.
http://www.cnbc.com/id/46876739?__so...S*tag*&par=RSS
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Old March 29th, 2012, 02:53 PM   #3409
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Google Campus opened by Chancellor George Osborne
29 March 2012

The UK will become the "technology centre of Europe", Chancellor George Osborne has vowed.

He was speaking at the opening of Google Campus, a new centre offering desk space and mentoring for technology companies.

Mr Osborne said Campus was part of a wider effort to "create the next generation of British technologies".

Google's Eze Vidra described the opening as a "transformational moment for the UK start-up community".

Campus is situated in the Old Street area of east London, an area dubbed the Silicon Roundabout.

The new building incorporates existing co-working space TechHub, which has now moved out of its original premises.

On the building's sixth floor is SeedCamp, an early stage investment programme which puts cash into about 20 fledgling technology companies a year.

Partnership
Mr Osborne said the work between Google and the government's Tech City initiative was the first of several partnerships required to give the sector sufficient support.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

This is the path we need to take to create new jobs”

George Osborne Chancellor

"This partnership model is absolutely in line with our approach to Tech City," he said.

"The government doesn't believe you can click your fingers and create a technology cluster. Wherever possible, our approach is to go with the grain of what's already happening."

He said since the Tech City initiative was launched in 2010, the number of technology firms in the area had risen from 200 to 700 - although this high number is often disputed by those within the community.

Further plans to bring research and development companies to the area would mean the UK remained at the "very cutting edge of innovation", the chancellor said.

"We want the UK to become the hub for technology in Europe as a whole.

"This is the path we need to take to create new jobs, new growth, and new prosperity in every corner of this country."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-17548128
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Old March 29th, 2012, 03:14 PM   #3410
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The Britain we made

From Bowie’s bolero to a Conran coffee table, the V&A’s new exhibition looks at how design defines our Britishness



Futuristic vision: among the displays is an image of Zaha Hadid’s Olympic Aquatics Centre

28 March 2012

In Olympic and Jubilee year, we can expect a lot more of this kind of thing: a big survey exhibition addressed to the question of Britishness. The Victoria & Albert Museum’s effort is British Design from 1948 to 2012: Innovation in the Modern Age, an ambitious and wide-ranging show of product and interior design, architecture, graphics, advertising, fashion, textiles, ceramics, video games and more, trying to give a picture of the applied arts in all their forms, as they relate to our national identity.

There are the hoary old saws from design history: the Festival of Britain, Swinging London, the Mini and Biba, punk, post-punk and Factory Records (they needn’t have taken this stuff down after the Postmodernism show at the beginning of the year), and now Britain as a producer of international star designers, dominating the world through Paul Smith’s suits, Jonathan Ive’s iPads and Zaha Hadid’s futuristic buildings. This is the UK plc story that the country has been selling for years to anyone who’ll listen.

But, to its credit, the V&A has put together an exhibition that is about much more than just that corporate gloss. It’s ambitious and complex in its selections, does not feel promotional (or at least, not totally promotional) and has some genuine surprises. There is a map of Tolkien’s Middle Earth from 1971 in a faux-medieval style, and floral Osborne & Little wallpaper that’s unlikely to appear in Wallpaper* magazine any time soon. These are the anomalies, the strange cousins to the designers’ own narrative of post-war design, that show Britain’s enduringly ambiguous relationship with modernity.

The exhibition’s story is bound by two arbitrary dates: the last London Olympics in 1948 and this year’s Games. After the war, the nation was cheered up first by the Olympics and then the Festival of Britain in 1951, which is where the V&A’s story begins. This watershed for British modernism is illustrated by a range of drawings, objects and graphic posters in the show. The Royal Festival Hall, designed by the London County Council’s architects’ department under Peter Moro and Leslie Martin, was the festival’s permanent legacy but there was much more. The Skylon: a soaring monument to a vague but thrilling technological future. The Dome of Discovery: a structurally radical building that was, at the time, the largest domed structure ever built. London, and Britain, had entered the 20th century.

But the telling quotation about this event is from JM Richards in the Architectural Review, which is included in the exhibition catalogue. He wrote at the time: “Britain has for the first time this summer, instead of a few freakish examples of a modern style, a whole quarter where the 20th century Englishman can wander about in a world of his own making.” The sense of astonishment is palpable. Modernism had been a freakish occurrence until 1951, and was considered freakish in all but a very few places until long after.

The frustration at this state of affairs from would-be moderns is obvious in the exhibition’s catalogue. There are plenty of commentators who think the leaden-footed British public just wasn’t hip enough to cotton on to the new style that was being revealed to them by design visionaries. Terence Conran, for instance, who was a 20-year-old assistant to Eduardo Paolozzi in 1951, writes in the catalogue: “It was amazing to see all these people on the South Bank in their mackintoshes, with their gas mask cases filled with sandwiches. It was the first time they had seen colour and all those exciting architecural shapes ... the Festival demonstrated that there was an alternative to the rather sad repro furniture that was available on the British high street.” I wonder what Terence was wearing at the time.

The sense of the public not knowing what’s good for them is common in the mainstream of modern design in this country. In mainland Europe, modernism was associated with Leftist ideas of the communal and developed alongside welfare state politics that played down the individual. Here, as Conran demonstrates, modernism was mixed in with a patrician attitude to taste that still dominates a certain kind of architecture and design today. The problem with any modern avant-garde is that it always considers itself somewhat apart from the rest of us.

But even its authors seemed not to know precisely what modernism was for. There is one very beautiful drawing in the exhibition, of Ralph Tubbs’s Skylon, that made me laugh out loud. It is a section drawing of the soaring, steel obelisk, boldly titled VERTICAL FEATURE. We have come full circle today with our own ArcelorMittal Orbit tower at the Olympic Park (which is not included in the exhibition), another “vertical feature” searching for a reason to exist.

It is interesting that this exhibition is subtitled with the horrible noun “innovation”, a meaningless piece of marketing speak that betrays modern design’s obsession with novelty. If you must believe that there is a cultural cutting edge somewhere, on this evidence it seems to me that Britain has, in fact, been nowhere near it for most of the 20th century in terms of design and architecture, and arguably still isn’t. Industrial design legend Kenneth Grange (whose Brownie Vecta camera is in the show), writing in the catalogue, sums up the feeling of receiving modern design second hand. “All of a sudden — and mainly from Scandinavia and the US — came modernism. This we had only seen in magazines before. It was a heady extravagance and it came in a rush.”

There are things in this exhibition that make you feel Britons have effected significant change, though. The British-designed video games on show were revolutionary in their field: Elite (1984), Tomb Raider (1996) and Grand Theft Auto (1997). David Bowie’s clothes, Saatchi & Saatchi’s advertising, iD and Face magazines all left permanent, transformational legacies. In architecture and interior and furniture design, though, the material gives you a sense of a country on the edge of modernism, at odds with avant-gardism. We were not totally convinced by this modern design stuff, really, and we were far from the best at it.

The most contemporary layer of the exhibition’s material makes the case for London being a kind of catch-all design capital that produces great designers, and welcomes talent from across the world to stay here. However, co-opting into “British design” a generation of young, foreign-born designers (the same ones who are always in V&A shows about contemporary design, by the way) who have happened to make London their home doesn’t tell us anything about Britishness. All it tells us is that London is a great place to be a young person on the make. I suspect the work of these people relies very little on the culture of this city, and that they could just as easily imagine themselves in Berlin, New York or Tokyo should circumstances change.

The fact that Jonathan Ive, Apple’s design director, was born in Chingford doesn’t make the iPad British. It is a product of a globalised world, designed to become obsolete very soon, and exploiting global supply chains to amass sums of money bigger than many countries’ GDPs. These designers are as stateless as hedge-fund managers, betraying no regional or national identity or loyalty in their work. If London gets another Olympics in another 60 years, people will probably laugh nostalgically at the idea of a show about a country’s identity in design.
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/arts/a...e-7593903.html
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Old March 29th, 2012, 03:17 PM   #3411
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London 2012: Builders shortlisted for Olympic Park homes
28 March 2012



Three companies have been shortlisted to build 800 homes in the first neighbourhood to be developed at the Olympic Park site in east London.

East Thames and Countryside Properties, Barratt Homes and LeFrak Organisation plus Taylor Wimpey and London & Quadrant have been selected.

Chobham Manor will consist of 800 homes in the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

The Olympic Park Legacy Company (OPLC) plans to select the winning bidder this summer ready for residents in 2014.

Chobham Manor will be the first of five neighbourhoods to be developed on the site after this summer's Games.

.....
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17535119




Quote:
London is top city for investment, KPMG report says

London remains the top city in the world for foreign investment, according to a report that reflects the rise of emerging economies.



The next two cities are Shanghai and Hong Kong, China's financial capitals, consulting firm KPMG and Greater Paris Investment Agency said.

Brazil's Sao Paulo had the biggest leap, to fourth, increasing investment by 160% over the past two years.

Other cities in the Bric group of nations also rose strongly.

Brazil, Russia, India and China are all growing at a blistering pace, while Europe has been in a slump and Europe hard-hit by a sovereign debt crisis.

It comes as Brazil recently became the sixth-biggest economy in the world, overtaking the UK. Its total output is worth $2.5tn (£1.6tn) and its financial capital is Sao Paulo.

This is often seen as part of a symbolic transition of power from industrialised countries to emerging economies.

In 2011, China officially overtook Japan as the world's second-biggest economy.

China and India together now constitute 25% of investments, KMPG said.

And Moscow has received a 60% jump in investment in the past two years, landing itself in eight place.

The five cities at the top - including New York - took 50% of the the total investment to the biggest 22 cities, KPMG said in its latest Global Cities Investment Monitor.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17378663
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Old March 29th, 2012, 03:52 PM   #3412
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Our certain "friends" across the channel would be most displeased by this news ..
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Old March 29th, 2012, 04:51 PM   #3413
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Originally Posted by LondonFox View Post
Our certain "friends" across the channel would be most displeased by this news ..
Aw, leave 'em alone. You're always baiting them.
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Old March 29th, 2012, 05:23 PM   #3414
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LondonFox View Post
Our certain "friends" across the channel would be most displeased by this news ..
lol, You seem to be obsessed by us, as well as by trying to prove something to yourself .... (inferiority complex ? Feel insecure in your own life ? )

Anyway, I'm sorry to disapoint you, but most of the 65 millions of your "friends" across the Channel, myself including, don't care at all about these futile stuff or about what UK/London may do or not do, since most of us are perfectly happy with our own lives in our country and we don't need these silly rankings to feel better.

IMHO, only lower-class & uneducated people with a miserable life, or 10-year old kids, must take all this seriously. I mean, does this kind of rankings change your personal life londonfox for example, do you need this to be happy in you everyday life ?

Oh, and don't get me wrong, I love London and Britain, I lived in London few years ago, I've been numerous times in several parts of the UK and I have many British friends, most of them love France BTW and own a secondary residence over here (I even have one of my cousins who married a Brit., they live in Hampstead and I visit them quite often), but believe it or not, I never had any sort of those "dick contest discussions" (P vs L, F vs UK, London/UK "über alles" etc) with any of them. Maybe because they are well educated, so they don't really care about these stuff and they just enjoy a place for what it is, avoiding silly comparisons, just like I do. ()
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Old March 29th, 2012, 05:23 PM   #3415
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Originally Posted by TheMoses View Post
Aw, leave 'em alone. You're always baiting them.
Its because its fun when they are proved wrong every time

Quote:
Wealthy prefer London when choosing home
Thursday 29th March 2012, 2:22am
TIM WALLACE

LONDON and New York are still the best places for the world’s elite to buy houses, a new study revealed yesterday – but competition is growing rapidly from Beijing and Dubai.

Quality of life, knowledge, influence and economic activity are all key factors for the ultra-wealthy in choosing where to invest, according to the latest wealth report from Knight Frank and City Private Bank.

London came top of the list in almost every area, though Washington DC pipped it at the post to be named top city for political influence.

In terms of economic growth, too, the UK dropped behind – every one of the top 10 cities on that measure is in China. However, despite the rapid growth in China, London is still expected to be top of the list in a decade’s time with New York still in second place, although Hong Kong is expected to have dropped from third in the rankings to sixth as Bejing, Shanghai and Singapore keep advancing.

Similarly Paris is forecast to fall from fourth to seventh over the period.

“Wealthy individuals and families, especially those originating from Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia, have become extraordinarily global in nature,” said Citi’s Luigi Pigorini. “With English a popular second language and a relatively weak pound, the global wealthy have focused their interest on London and the wealth preservation it can afford.”
http://www.cityam.com/latest-news/we...-choosing-home
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Old March 29th, 2012, 05:30 PM   #3416
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Its because its fun when they are proved wrong every time

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Old March 29th, 2012, 05:40 PM   #3417
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Canary Wharf Crossrail hits milestone 5 months early

Work has progressed at the Canary Wharf Crossrail station, with the first platform level being completed five months early.

Once finished, the transport hub will slash the time it takes to travel from London offices here to other business centres in the capital. The journey to Liverpool Street will take around six minutes, while Farringdon will be reached in less than ten minutes.

Employees who need to fly abroad to liaise with clients or other offices could be at Heathrow Airport in approximately 40 minutes. There will be 12 trains an hour at the Canary Wharf Crossrail station during peak hours, with the service scheduled to start in 2018.

By completing the first station platform level ahead of the expected time, the station is ready to accept tunnel boring machines next year. Work first started at the Canary Wharf exchange three years ago at the North Dock, with 375,000 tonnes of concrete poured and around 300,000 tonnes of material excavated.

Commenting on the work, Canary Wharf Contractors' executive director Cliff Bryant said: "We are very proud to have played our part in a project which will benefit London for many generations to come. Credit must be given to our workforce and supply chain, many of them local east Londoners, who have responded to a very challenging brief and delivered it to Crossrail ahead of time and within budget."

When completed, the total Crossrail network will pass through 37 stations from Heathrow and Maidenhead in the west to Abbey Wood and Shenfield in the east.

It will bring an extra 1.5 million individuals within a 45-minute commuting distance of London offices in the major business districts, with an expected 200 million people travelling on the network every year.

The central route includes Bond Street, Paddington, Canary Wharf, Tottenham Court Road, Liverpool Street, Whitechapel and Farringdon. All of these destinations will have a new Crossrail station.
http://www.mellersh.co.uk/News/Canar...801326850.aspx
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Old March 29th, 2012, 05:41 PM   #3418
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Must admit I'm not quite convinced that they're temporary or that the rest of the building isn't more like The Shard.

That render posted while I was writing this shows them well.

There's similar looking fins on the roof terrace

http://www.theplacelondon.com/gallery/visualisations

I'm momentarily reminded of (the very fine IMHO) 30 Cannon Street on the other side of the river, but that may just be me.

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30 Cannon Street by cybertect, on Flickr
i saw this building when i visited london in the summer last year, it looked really interesting and very appealing as well
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Old March 29th, 2012, 06:12 PM   #3419
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Its because its fun when they are proved wrong every time



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I was trying to be nice before. Well I hate to have to tell you this but it makes you look like a bit of a ****. I like living in London and I like my country most of the time. And yes I'd pick London over Paris any day. But so what? I prefer brunets but I'm not a dick to people who prefer blondes. It's ultimately an aesthetic decision for ****'s sake. So what if we do come out better on these rankings and measures? What does it even mean? It's just a way for you to say "we win!". I love this city because it's awesome, I have a great life here and I'm happy. And I'm offended that you would seek to belittle others' enjoyment of their city with your tawdry bleating.
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Old March 29th, 2012, 10:26 PM   #3420
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Assembly of the second crane has been going on the past few days, click for enlargements...





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