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Old April 12th, 2012, 02:58 AM   #3681
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1 Commercial St | Aldgate | 84m | 21 fl | U/C

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Old April 12th, 2012, 04:14 AM   #3682
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1 Commercial St Tower | U/C | The City

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Old April 12th, 2012, 08:48 AM   #3683
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New homes as cool as the Cucumber
Published10 April 2012

Take a cocktail in the Sky Bar and celebrate Paddington Basin’s 600 new homes from the top of London’s latest tower, says David Spittles


High-rise: the 42-storey Cucumber is helping in the regeneration of Paddington

Paddington is competing for a space on the London skyline with the tallest and only tower being allowed in Westminster council’s borough plan. Like the Gherkin and the Shard before it, the Cucumber is the latest skyscraper to have a nickname based on its shape.

One Merchant Square, to give the tower its proper name, is the showpiece of a cluster of four new buildings bringing 599 new homes and corporate offices — the final phase of regeneration at the west London waterfront complex.

The development will create an improved canal-side area, with a sculptural bridge across the water leading to a landscaped garden square, performance space and innovative “water maze”.

It is 12 years since regeneration kicked off at Paddington Basin. What was a closed-off industrial zone is now a convivial “urban quarter” of homes, shops and offices. Some say it lacks the charm and vitality of more established bordering neighbourhoods in Bayswater, Maida Vale and Little Venice.

But this new district has plenty of devotees because it is a well-priced location close to the West End and Hyde Park and with great transport links.

Paddington’s new Crossrail station, opening in 2017, is eagerly awaited despite the already popular Heathrow Express, because the new east-west route will provide quick journeys to Canary Wharf, meaning finance-sector executives will be able to live in west London and enjoy a quick and painless commute to Docklands.

Set amid high-quality public realm space, Merchant Square’s contemporary-design blocks are being built on land previously earmarked for a new medical campus, part of nearby St Mary’s Hospital, which was abandoned after spiralling costs. The tower will incorporate a deluxe hotel on the lower floors and be crowned by a glamorous sky bar, with 360-degree views.


The Cucumber, or One Merchant Square, to give its proper name, will be a striking centrepiece of Paddington Basin

STYLISH APARTMENTS
One of the scheme’s design goals is to reinvent the classic London garden square, with softer architecture and green space. “We don’t want it to look like a part of corporate America,” says Richard Banks, director of developer European Land, with a reference, perhaps, to Canary Wharf.

At the moment, the new eateries and bars at the basin are used mainly by in-the-know residents and office workers. Marks & Spencer, Orange and Visa are among the 40 companies who have relocated there, joining small support businesses who operate from barges moored on the canal.

When complete in four years’ time, more than 30,000 people will live and work there. Buoyed by Crossrail, this new business hub should underpin property values for people buying now.

Apartments are available to buy off-plan ahead of completion in 2014. Lower-rise buildings alongside the tower reach 21 floors and include shared-ownership flats.

Interiors are stylish and thoughtfully designed, with space efficient open-plan layouts (for example, concealed storage areas rather than a conventional entrance hallway) and a high-quality specification that includes oak herringbone flooring, air-conditioning and underfloor heating, heated bathroom walls, dressing areas and winter-garden balconies.

Floor-to-ceiling windows are pre-wired for motorised blinds, while “backbone” cabling includes Lutron lighting, audio-visual and security features.

Prices start at £632,500 for one-bedroom apartments and £965,000 for two-bedroom apartments (999-year leases). Penthouses with huge “sunset” terraces will be released later.

Underground parking spaces cost £50,000 and there will be a 24-hour concierge, gym, cinema screening room and business rooms for hire. Call 020 7993 7393.

Tower apartments have inset balconies, designed to maintain the elegant architectural lines.


Paddington Basin is a new residential area sitting on 80 acres of canal-side land

SHOWPIECE FOOTBRIDGES
The tower lies towards the rear of the site where it borders busy Harrow Road and Westway flyover. Banks says the building will mark the entry point into central London and he is keen to position the entire development as a West End rather than a west London address.

Yet Paddington is on the periphery of central London; symbolically, on the cusp of the congestion charge zone, though within comfortable walking distance of Marylebone and Marble Arch.

Certainly once-undesirable Paddington has turned the corner in terms of residential status. Bustling Praed Street, the main commercial drag, is improving, while seedy hotels near the train station are disappearing.

Many travellers passing through the station are unaware of the hidden canal basin. But new towpaths and showpiece footbridges across the canal have improved access, though the pedestrian environment is challenging.

Re-sales at the 468-home West End Quay, the rejuvenated basin’s earliest residential element completed in 2004, sell for about £900 per sq ft, lower than much of prime central London, according to estate agent Hamptons International. Apartments cost from about £460,000.



http://www.homesandproperty.co.uk/pr...rnewhomes.html
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Old April 12th, 2012, 03:50 PM   #3684
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Article from INDEX: Design to Improve Life

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IKEA is building a city in London
Do you ever dream of an entire city filled with Swedish
meatballs and do-it-yourself furniture? That dream could soon be a reality.


IKEA, the Swedish furniture company known for its Billy bookcase and eccentric instruction manuels, is entering the world of city planning, building and management, via its real estate division, according to The Daily Globe and Mail. In 2013, IKEA will begin construction on a self-contained neighborhood in the largely neglected area of East London, which will be called Strand East. Plans include 1,200 apartments and houses to accomodate 6,000 residents at a range of income levels, in addition to commercial space.

You won't have to deal with rows and rows of parked cars in the Ikea town either. The underground parking lot will take care of that, according to TIME. Nor would this be the first pre-assembled town in the history of the world. Far from it.

IKEA, which has recently launched a number of projects beyond its home furnishings business, may be looking to take advantage of recent government efforts to solve London's problematic housing situation. Last month, the UK government agreed to simplify urban planning laws in order to encourage sustainable urban planning projects, like IKEA's.

IKEA has launched efforts into more sustainable projects stateside, too. The first IKEA pre-fabricated home debuted last month in Portland, at a cost of just $86,500. Likewise, IKEA recently installed 4,620 solar panels on the roof of its Paramus, New Jersey store, building further on its efforts to promote renewable energy sources.
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Old April 12th, 2012, 04:33 PM   #3685
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It's cool when you think a project is yet to be approved and it's already U/C.

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Old April 12th, 2012, 04:50 PM   #3686
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BAM to construct Burberry’s Westminster offices

BAM has been appointed to rework a historic building for developer Derwent London to provide new headquarters office space in Westminster, SW1 for global luxury brand Burberry.

Burberry signed a pre-let on the entire building in February this year agreeing to pay an annual rent of £5.3m for a 20-year term.

BAM Construct UK is to give the former government offices in Central London at 1 Page Street, a £23m upgrade.

The building was used as Westminster Hospital in the 1960s and more recently as a home for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. BAM will carry out extensive works to create 118,000 sq m of high quality, contemporary office space.

The scheme will include a steel frame extension, removal and disposal of the existing façade and replacing it with modern brick and punched windows. New lifts, external works, and mechanical and electrical services will be provided, as well as raised floors and suspended ceilings.

Construction director Mike Donegan said: "I am extremely pleased that BAM has secured this important contract with Derwent London. The project will require a comprehensive reworking of the existing building, particularly given its historic uses.

"We look forward to creating the fantastic office space that this prime location deserves, and continuing our relationship with Derwent. The London commercial sector is beginning to improve after a difficult few years and BAM is proving that it is well placed to play a big role in its future."

BAM Construct completed a major refurbishment of the iconic Angel Building to provide new office space near King's Cross for Derwent last year and is about to complete a commercial office space scheme in Chiswick, W4 for sister firm BAM Properties.
http://www.freeofficesearch.co.uk/Of...year=April2012
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Old April 12th, 2012, 04:52 PM   #3687
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It's cool when you think a project is yet to be approved and it's already U/C.
that's right and it scares me sometimes when i see these countless amount of projects happening in london.

i mean this city is just so crazy compared to the rest of european cities.

Last edited by SO143; April 12th, 2012 at 05:00 PM.
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Old April 12th, 2012, 04:56 PM   #3688
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Projects built in London are a fracture of the size of those built in NY. NY has a lot more on the boards.
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i think crossrail alone is bigger and costlier than any project happening in nyc.

on top of that plenty of highrises, skyscrapers, stations, residential apartments, stadia and a massive olympic park etc are also u/c in london.

i reckon even toronto is ahead of new york in terms of new construction
You're right SO143. Walpole has a bit of an issue with London, so I'd take his comments with a pinch of salt. London's infrastructure projects in particular are vastly larger than anything in New York. Crossrail, Thameslink, the Tube upgrade (eg the new S Stock on the cut-and-cover lines), London Overground, Heathrow T5, Heathrow East/T2, HS1 and the expanded St Pancras/King's Cross, London Gateway container port, etc, are all far larger than any projects in New York. New York also has no equivalents to the huge new Westfield shopping malls recently built in London, nor any match for London's current/recent stadia projects, such as Wembley, Olympic venues, Arsenal Emirates Stadium, O2 Dome Arena, Wimbledon's new Centre and No. 1 courts, Twickenham expansion, Tottenham's prospective new stadium, etc. We could go and mention major development zones like Wembley City, everything in Stratford, Elephant & Castle, Nine Elms, King's Cross Railway lands, Royal Docks, etc. London's been building more big projects than NYC for years, and it will remain that way for the forseeable future (ie until ~2020).
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Old April 12th, 2012, 05:28 PM   #3689
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^ don't get me wrong, i do admire new york but london is on top of the game and ahead of new york in terms of new construction and development.

Last edited by SO143; April 13th, 2012 at 12:31 AM.
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Old April 12th, 2012, 05:52 PM   #3690
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Dagenham Dock Extension

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IMG_2406 by mwmbwls, on Flickr

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IMG_2403 by mwmbwls, on Flickr

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IMG_2405 by mwmbwls, on Flickr
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Old April 12th, 2012, 06:06 PM   #3691
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Highest tourist volumes since the turn of a century, as Heathrow passes 70 million passengers for the first time:
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/l...r-7636749.html
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Old April 12th, 2012, 06:25 PM   #3692
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^ no doubt heathrow will continue to maintain it's status as the busiest airport in the world (in terms of annual passenger traffic) but i support the new boris island airport which will not only create a lot jobs but boost the economy as well. can you imagine the future of london, it's efficiency and economy when the queen elizabeth park (europe's largest), high speed crossrail (europe's biggest project) and that massive boris island are finished, it is on the right track imo
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Old April 12th, 2012, 06:32 PM   #3693
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London Overground passengers to get free Wi-Fi



Travellers on London Overground will get an hour's free Wi-Fi access each day, after the company that operates the rail network signed a deal with wireless provider The Cloud.

Wi-Fi access will be available at no charge in and around all 56 London Overground-operated stations. The hotspot rollout will begin in the summer, with 12 stations scheduled to be hooked up by the end of this year.

"Access to the internet is no longer limited solely to home or to the workplace, and people's expectation is to be able to work and communicate effectively and seamlessly while they're on the move. So we're delighted to support this initiative which will bring reliable, free Wi-Fi to London Overground's customers," Steve Murphy, managing director of London Overground Rail Operations Ltd (LOROL), said in a statement on Monday.

The stations in line to get Wi-Fi connectivity this year are Willesden Junction, West Hampstead, New Cross Gate, Forest Hill, West Croydon, Norwood Junction, Surrey Quays, Dalston, Wapping, Hackney Central, Kensington Olympia and Shepherd's Bush.

Passengers will only have to register once for the service, which will give them 60 free minutes of use each day, according to London Overground.

Earlier in March, Virgin Media signed a similar deal to provide Wi-Fi in London Underground stations. The operator will initially provide its service in 80 Tube stations free of charge, but will likely introduce fees after the Olympics for non-Virgin customers.

London Underground and London Overground are operated by two different entities — Transport for London (TfL) and LOROL respectively — although the services of both are generally delivered under TfL's branding.

TfL confirmed to ZDNet UK that passengers will need separate accounts for The Cloud's Overground network and Virgin's Underground network, and there would be no interplay between the two systems.
http://www.zdnet.co.uk/news/networki...i-fi-40154884/
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Old April 12th, 2012, 06:40 PM   #3694
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Look and learn: intelligent design for education

The £17.5 million new building for Kingston University’s business school is the kind of practical space that offers a striking lesson in intelligent, fit-for-purpose design


11 April 2012

Order, modesty and contextual sensitivity have been out of fashion in architecture for most of the last century. You don’t need to look hard for the evidence. Whether it’s the ghettoes of a post-war modernist estate or the monumental icon-mongering of superstar architects in the City of London, the mainstream of architecture has rejected the idea that a city has an order of its own, and that its task should be to extend and preserve it.

But if a trend goes away for long enough, it can look alluring on its return. Thus it is that Hawkins Brown’s new building for Kingston Business School, at its campus on a wooded hill near Norbiton, might look austere, staid, even unfriendly at first sight but convinces more and more as you spend time around it. It is a four-sided brick building, with relentlessly regular openings for windows. Bronze-coloured metal panels and window bars add a certain material richness to the deep red-brick facades. And inside, a simple, logical plan belies the complexity of the site.

The building, which officially opens on April 23, is a £17.5 million new home for the business school of Kingston University, which offers a range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses across a variety of business disciplines. The admin facilities and lecture theatres are located on the ground and first floor, with classrooms and individual offices for academics on the upper three floors. It is in the heart of the Kingston campus on a hilly site previously occupied by Fifties-style student housing. Hemmed in by buildings and topography, the architects designed a building that can be entered from all four sides, at different levels, making it somehow central to this incoherent campus, and giving a sense of order to the whole — a great achievement that stands as a hopeful example of order, practicality and sobriety.

The architect, Hawkins Brown, is not one of Britain’s internationally known stars, and better known for doing a decent, responsible job in the trenches of London architecture: social housing (including the redevelopment of the Woodberry Down Estate in Hackney), further and higher education (such as Hackney Community College) and the complex and long-running task of bringing Crossrail into Tottenham Court Road station. It has a diverse body of work, not stylistically very coherent, but this building feels like a watershed: a confident performance in an inauspicious location.

Kingston University is in a conservation area, bounded by protected woodland, but the almost complete lack of architectural quality in the existing campus suggests that these conditions have been poorly enforced by the local planning department in the past. Greeting you as you arrive on campus is a hilariously awful set of buildings that look to date from the early Nineties, all beige brick, green windows and staircases so badly proportioned that you have trouble walking down them without tripping over. The college café is an unhygienic-looking Sixties building with the faint smell of bleach in the hallway its most memorable aspect. A single exception to this banal architecture is a glass extension to the library, completed in 2007 and designed by John McAslan (the architect behind the new concourse at King’s Cross railway station) which at least brings some coherence to the space outside.

Hawkins Brown took its cue from that building, framing a street-like space along the south of the campus with its new brick block. It’s strategically savvy but the real test of architecture such as this is how it comes together in the details. When you strip back the pallette of materials, it really matters how one material meets another. An awkwardly cut brick or a clumsy mastic join can defeat the whole strategy, and in the main Hawkins Brown has avoided the potential pitfalls.

The building has a concrete frame but the brick cladding is designed to appear monolithic and substantial, making a permanent, imposing impression. The deep window reveals, which help shade the interior, are lined in brick (including the floor at ground level). Expansion joints are cunningly hidden, and the windows are coloured a classy shade of anodised bronze.

It doesn’t cost any more money to do any of this — the architect estimates a similar per square metre cost to the execrable Nineties buildings all around on the campus, and the bricks used are among the cheapest you can find. It just takes a good architect and a trusting client.

Hawkins Brown’s great victory here has been to retain control of the construction. In most university buildings, and public buildings in general, construction is entirely delegated to the builder rather than supervised by the architect, meaning that all too often projects are needlessly dumbed down as money runs out towards the end of a contract. Here, Hawkins Brown project architect Nicola Rutt (an alumnus of Kingston University) was required by the contract to remain part of the team and thus was able to ensure that the austere simplicity of her building sings.

Inside, the internal courtyard orders the whole, with the brick piers of the perimeter collonnade suggesting a cloister or quadrangle that lightly references the best historic architecture for education.

It would be easy to overstate the achievement of a modest building such as this but I raise it to advocate what is important about architecture in a city such as London. This building creates decent spaces around it, has a sense of permanence and dignity, is organised well, performs environmentally and is a steep change in architectural quality for an institution in a part of London not known for brilliant contemporary architecture.

These are major successes. In this building you get the impression of architectural experience being brought to bear on an inauspicious site with limited means, creating a building of character and quality.

It is not just architects who have forgotten the value of order in the city but institutions too. When they build new buildings, universities (outside of Oxford and Cambridge) ask for maximum flexibility, creating buildings that resemble conference centres or offices rather than seats of learning. As institutions become more generic, so does their architecture. Architects would much rather design a place that’s specific to a rich instititution with its own habits, rituals and population, and the results of that kind of brief usually lead to a greater contribution to the character of the city.

Kingston University’s new building looks like it will last, and in an increasingly virtual world, that’s a value architecture provides that is worth having. Could the rest of the mainstream of architecture be persuaded that the order created by buildings is more important than the author’s artistry? We can only hope so. It is self-effacing but highly competent buildings such as this that can rebuild the public’s faith in architects, and give our city institutions of value that will outlast us.
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/arts/a...n-7630998.html
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Old April 12th, 2012, 07:09 PM   #3695
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Quote:
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^ no doubt heathrow will continue to maintain it's status as the busiest airport in the world (in terms of annual passenger traffic) but i support the new boris island airport which will not only create a lot jobs but boost the economy as well. can you imagine the future of london, it's efficiency and economy when the queen elizabeth park (europe's largest), high speed crossrail (europe's biggest project) and that massive boris island are finished, it is on the right track imo
As do I the Thames hub is a really well conceived idea by Foster + Partners and would really ease the strain at Heathrow. Go build
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Old April 12th, 2012, 08:11 PM   #3696
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^ here's one of my favourite projects in london, so excited

New $1bn U.S Embassy In London Approved

KieranTimberlake, a Philadelphia-based architecture firm, won the design competition for the new U.S. embassy in London. The design had to be modern, welcoming, timeless, safe and energy efficient. Needless to say, these lofty design objectives posed significant challenges for four final architectural firms which also included Morphosis Architects, Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, and Richard Meier & Partners. Located at Nine Elms, and near an urban park, the ground breaking for the all-new embassy building is slated for 2013 and should be completed in 2017.













http://london.usembassy.gov/new_embassy.html
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Old April 12th, 2012, 08:20 PM   #3697
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London mayoral elections: how new housing powers could change the campaign
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Old April 12th, 2012, 08:26 PM   #3698
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the new U.S. embassy in London will look great and very impressive
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Old April 12th, 2012, 09:48 PM   #3699
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Amazing embassy design, by the way has anyone made a thread about the cucumber yet?
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Old April 12th, 2012, 11:26 PM   #3700
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as far as i am aware a dedicated thread for the cucumber tower has not been opened yet

Last edited by SO143; April 13th, 2012 at 12:29 AM.
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